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Discussion Starter #1
Okay I see a 1982 900cc Mike Hailwood Replica
22,400 miles

Last ridden 1998.
Is it really WORTH $11,500?

 

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Sure it's worth it if the engine is in solid condition. How serious are you ? And have you ridden bikes of this era before ?

Rainman said:
Okay I see a 1982 900cc Mike Hailwood Replica
22,400 miles

Last ridden 1998.
Is it really WORTH $11,500?

 

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It's close to what I let my MHR go for. I'd say it's worth it, if it's decent. One thing to remember is the bottom end is roller bearings on these, vs. the plain bearings on the '85.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well, I am curious at least.

And no, I have never ridden this era a bike.
Would I be happier with say, a 750 Paso?
 

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Hard to say whether you'd like a 750 Paso or an original Mike Hailwood better. Depends on your type of riding, and what you like.
The Paso is 16 inch wheels front and rear, and carburation is hard to get right with the Weber unless you switch to Dellortos or Mikunis.
I think the 907 was a better bike.
The Mike Hailwood is a big, long bike, fairing can scrape cornering, and it doesn't like traffic. Hot and noisy with that full fairing.
I think a 750SS or 900SS is a better bike. Or even my 750 Sport.
Boith are acquired tastes I think.
Happy hunting!
Richard
 

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I generally concur with these comments, Bill. The later plain bearing engine ( which was known as the Mille ) is the ultimate refinement of the bevel...getting teary eyed now....engine. A real modern engine, which alas, was promptly replaced by the Pantah engine, the father of the current Monster and SS engines. ( Bordi said it was 30% more expensive to build and the rest is history. But I like the earlier bikes better. Less refined in the details.

I had a chance to ride an early MHR two weeks ago up in Minnesota and fell in love with the thing. Unlike the others which I have ridden, this one's owner had spent some time with the suspension ( ride height, modern shocks etc.) and I fell in love again. Not nearly the truckish, well, as truckish handling of the other bikes.)

If you really want it you need to spend some time in the saddle with it, and get the very best estimates of what the internals really are. If the seller can't deliver an extensive ride for you, or find a way to assure you that the engine is solid...uh, poor choice of words there...in great condition, then just walk away.

The Paso is a far better handling bike, and lovely to look at, but just no grunt at all. Personally, I would pass. As an aside, I have seen several with 916/996 engines in them, and I was really impressed with this "update". Now the Paso could really walk the talk. But otherwise, they just don't move my soul.

Lastly, I agree with Richard's ranking below. Ultimately it is your money, so take your time. If you like, I will take some photocopies from the Falloon/ Walker literature and fax it to you if you are really interested. Just PM me your fax number.

b.
trid741 said:
Hard to say whether you'd like a 750 Paso or an original Mike Hailwood better. Depends on your type of riding, and what you like.
The Paso is 16 inch wheels front and rear, and carburation is hard to get right with the Weber unless you switch to Dellortos or Mikunis.
I think the 907 was a better bike.
The Mike Hailwood is a big, long bike, fairing can scrape cornering, and it doesn't like traffic. Hot and noisy with that full fairing.
I think a 750SS or 900SS is a better bike. Or even my 750 Sport.
Boith are acquired tastes I think.
Happy hunting!
Richard
 

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Discussion Starter #10
It is very original.
It does run.
The engine seems good, but without a teardown (which I would do), I can't say for sure.

But just when I thought I was good to go, I see a Paso.
I love the looks, but damn, with no grunt, I would be disappointed.

The only other one that really moved me was a Supermono. I mean I have the SSie now, and she is all hopped up, and I have gotten VERY used to the power. In fact, I would like to see a 944 kit in my VERY near future.

Of course, they ALL give me wood. The Hailwood just looks aggressive. The Paso looks like a work of art. The Supermono is an inspiring piece of machine.

Choices, choices, choices.

Why couldn't I have been born rich, instead of good looking!;)

LOL!
 

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Rainman said:
But just when I thought I was good to go, I see a Paso.
I love the looks, but damn, with no grunt, I would be disappointed.
I believe, someone correct me if I'm wrong, that the '92 Paso 907ie is THE Paso to get. It is supposed to have the upgraded 17" wheels and all the other refinements that they made to the model before it was discontinued. Going price on the 907ie is typically $5000-$6000, from what I've seen them go for on eBay.....which is more than a lot of the early ST2 (1998-2000) bikes go for. I've always liked the looks of the Paso and have wanted one for years. I like both the blue and the yellow Paso 750s, especailly when you can find them for $2500-$3500 in decent shape. Ideally, if I ever had the room and money for one, I'd like to have a '92 907ie......or a nice, clean 851 or 888. ;)
 

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Yes, the 907ie has 17 inch wheels and fuel injection, so it's a really good ride.
Also, like you say, these bikes are beautiful, designed by Tamburini of 916/748, MV and Bimota fame.
Only drawbacks I feel are white wheels (always dirty), and a seating/fairing position not too great at high speeds (wind), although they put a little spoiler on the 907's windshield to improve that somewhat.
Rgds
Richard
 

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Desmo_Demon said:
......or a nice, clean 851 or 888. ;)
Now you are talking !

Body by Tibaldi of MV Augusta Corse fame, engine by Bordi. I love mine and if I were forced to sell all bikes, it would be the last to go.
 
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Buy the Hailwood to mount in your living room to enjoy over a glass of wine, for that, it's worth the price tag. Watch Ebay, I've seen a few go in the $8,500 to $9,500 range within the past 3 months with one super one going for $11,000 with every toy known to man kind on it. Buy an SS SP to ride and enjoy, you won't worry about lower ends or scratches. An SL just sold there for $7,300 and it was also quite beautiful and really rare now days. The Hailwood's one of the coolest things around, but, not to be ridden much if at all, just stared at in awe. Ray
 

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Bill, I just bought a very original 86 MHR Mille in Switzerland - should be in Prague by your next visit. Probably going to take it to the GP.
 

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injected said:
Bill, I just bought a very original 86 MHR Mille in Switzerland - should be in Prague by your next visit. Probably going to take it to the GP.
THAT is a nice bike.
 

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bevel450 said:
THAT is a nice bike.
It was an impulse buy. I went for a lunchtime walk during a business trip, past a couple of bike shops, and to my surprise this MHR was sitting in the middle of the Harley dealer's showroom. They let me take it for a test ride (without asking for ID or a license or even knowing my name!) and it seems faultless, except for a battery that won't hold a charge.

We agreed a price straighaway when I got back and now I am wrestling with how to import it into the Czech Republic. Luckily one of the guys I race with here imports used cars for a living and knows the right people!!
 

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injected said:
Bill, I just bought a very original 86 MHR Mille in Switzerland - should be in Prague by your next visit. Probably going to take it to the GP.
Nice! How many miles on her? The Mille was the most durable bevel twin. You will want to install an AGM battery (I used a SVR 20) and have some new battery cables made up for it, the original cables were crap. Doing this will reduce the demand on the starter motor and make it last. I know, it seems counter-intuitive but it's true, increase the current to the starter motor to make it last.
 

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Thanks for the guidance Mike, keep it coming! It has 22,000km or about 13,500 miles on the clock.
 

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After my '76 SS a Hailwood Replica has always benn on my list of "to get one day" bikes. They're getting rarer and rarer though, if you have the opportunity buy it!

And for you guys professing your love of the Paso....eewww...takes all sorts I guess...
 
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