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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've got an '07 S4RS, I live in south west Florida & do a lot of night driving. There are more animals on the roads here at night, than any place I've ever been!
Does anyone have any comments, or experience with the brightest replacement bulbs? I know HID would be the brightest, but I'm looking for a cheaper, easier way out!
 

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I've got an '07 S4RS, I live in south west Florida & do a lot of night driving. There are more animals on the roads here at night, than any place I've ever been!
Does anyone have any comments, or experience with the brightest replacement bulbs? I know HID would be the brightest, but I'm looking for a cheaper, easier way out!
I installed a hid bulp on my Monster 1100S. I replaced the low beam h7 and its brighter than the normal hi beam. I bought it from ebay, 35$! Its a slim ballast and 6000K!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Awesome! Thanks Larry, I think I'll spring for the HID's, IF they have a retrofit for my S4RS!
 

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I have been using a Philips X-tremePower bulb... Sure, it's not a HID, but it's cheap, noticeably brighter and just drop's in
 

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I've got an '07 S4RS, I live in south west Florida & do a lot of night driving. There are more animals on the roads here at night, than any place I've ever been!
Does anyone have any comments, or experience with the brightest replacement bulbs? I know HID would be the brightest, but I'm looking for a cheaper, easier way out!
Sorry to drop in, usually in the SS forum, but was looking for Monster rearset options when I spotted this.

Duc poor lighting is usually because of the too small wires used in the loom. I had over 2V drop from the battery to headlight, which means some 30% loss of light and yellow colour/color. I fixed mine by adding a slave relay with a 6mm2 cable from the fuse box to the common of the relay, then 6mm2 from the relay to low and high beam at the headlight. Also ran a 6mm2 black cable from the headlight to the battery negative. These 3 cables were connected to a new H4 connector I bought. The relay, in the normally closed position powers low beam. The relay coil is powered from the H4 connector in the original harness. I.e. neg from the connector goes to one side of the coil and the high beam terminal goes to the other side of the coil. This means when you flick to high beam, the coil is energised and the relay switches the power from low to high beam.

Cost approx AUD$ 20 plus time.
 

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I installed a hid bulp on my Monster 1100S. I replaced the low beam h7 and its brighter than the normal hi beam. I bought it from ebay, 35$! Its a slim ballast and 6000K!
Any pictures of the resulting beam pattern? Did the entire H7 bulb fit behind the shield without modification?
 

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Excellent Info!
Thanks Punch!
You are welcome - it is an obsession of mine due to the crap SS lighting. This site used to have brilliant info but checking just now it seems to have been removed. www.danielsternlighting.com

However, it offers after market relay kits (including motorcycles) that may be worth looking at.

With my heavy duty wiring/relay I am running a white Philips (expensive) bulb 60/55 rating, however due to my wiring I could safely run a 110/90 if I could be bothered to dig out the bulb I have somewhere, but don't feel I need to.

As a point of info, there is no sense or benefit in sticking a higher rated bulb into the stock wiring. All this will do is lose more power in the crap stock wires rather than give credible more light.

The problem is our cables (and many/most other bikes) are small. They run from the battery to main fuse, then through some connectors, then to the fuse box, then up to the front, then over to the switch in the handlebar, then off to the headlight. I.e. so many small cables and relatively long runs, connectors and switches to end up at the headlight. Too much resistance and hence voltage drop so the bulb does not see/receive the voltage it was designed for.

Richard
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes I know, 12V diminishes rapidly over distance, the old DC, Edison vs. AC, Tesla debate, but I've already purchased an HID system, fairly cheaply, that I'm hoping will give me significantly more light, with considerably less drain.
 

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Yes I know, 12V diminishes rapidly over distance, the old DC, Edison vs. AC, Tesla debate, but I've already purchased an HID system, fairly cheaply, that I'm hoping will give me significantly more light, with considerably less drain.
Good old Ohms Law Voltage = current x resistance.

The brilliant thing about HID is that it produces about three times the light output of a conventional bulb. Optics can be an issue though. Conventional bulbs use a filament and manufacturers have tight control over where the filament is. HID (like the arc from a welder) may not sit in the "sweet spot" to provide the correct pattern. This is fine for the rider/driver as the output is brilliant, but oncoming traffic may be dazzled. This is one of the reasons OEM headlights have auto headlamp positioning (dipping) controls and headlamp washers to clean off dirt that may disperse the light in a dangerous manner.

Bottom line - I would still do it and did on a little CBR250RR I own. This sports twin HID - one low and one high. I modded where the arc sits and the shield for low beam to provide astounding (and safe) lighting.
 

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This is also why there are DxS vs DxR bulbs. The DxR bulbs (D1R, D2R, D3R, and D4R) are designed for reflector housings, while the DxS bulbs (D1S, D2S, D3S, and D4S) are designed for projectors.
 

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Slave wiring diag and lumens vs voltage

The attachment shows the wiring for a slave relay and decent cables to get almost full battery voltage to the bulb/bulbs.

It also shows the approximate lumens output vs voltage at the bulb for an H4 bulb. It may not be exactly the same for other bulb types, but serves to demonstrate how much light output is lost due to resistance in small wiring, lots of connectors and switches.

E.g 14 V at the bulb is about 1350 lumens. If you have 2 V loss like I used to have between the battery and the bulb, then the bulb is getting 12 V, so only 800 lumens!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! and a yellow output.

This wiring also means you can use a higher wattage bulb if the headlamp can take the extra heat.

Richard
 

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Headlight wiring upgrade

I have added some more info to hopefully make it easier for people to do this simple rewire to get decent lighting.

Richard
 

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Any pictures of the resulting beam pattern? Did the entire H7 bulb fit behind the shield without modification?
I can post pictures this weekend when I visit the garage. The HID bulp was abit more "longer" than the original one. Just fitted couple thin steel pieces under the hid bulp..The biggest job was to find a place for the ballast. I fitted it behind the oil cooler(more on top of it, hard to explain). Im not just sure if I want to leave the hid bulp because it's really bright! :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I just received my DDM, HID headlight bulb kit, and even though I'm a fairly good mechanic (For 40 years!), the sheer number and size of the parts is daunting! Instructions look like they were printed in China too! Hope I can find places to hide all this crap!
 

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Heavy duty wiring for single bulb headlights/headlamps

Dropping in again, as I posted more info on the H4 (twin filament) solution in the SS section, so i thought I would do up the single bulb option for you guys.

The attachment shows simple rewiring for a single bulb.

You can do it for just one bulb or repeat the whole thing for the other.

I had HID for a short while but the scattered light was too bright for oncoming traffic. Also illegal to fit HID in vehicles not originally fitted with them in Australia and probably most other countries.

This design gives you better and legal lighting using the stock bulb. You can even fit a higher wattage bulb, as the wires will cope, but the headlamp shell etc. may not!

Rather than try to find the correct connector for the bulb, you may be able to find larger conventional female spade connectors that fit the bulb terminals. Make sure they are insulated. It does not matter which way round you connect to the bulb as nothing else is connected to the relay. Same with the connections from the relay coil (85 and 86) to the stock bulb connector.



Have fun, see and be seen!

Richard
 

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I can post pictures this weekend when I visit the garage. The HID bulp was abit more "longer" than the original one. Just fitted couple thin steel pieces under the hid bulp..The biggest job was to find a place for the ballast. I fitted it behind the oil cooler(more on top of it, hard to explain). Im not just sure if I want to leave the hid bulp because it's really bright! :D

Well, I just did mine yesterday. I wound up sticking the igniter to the left side of the air box, between the frame tubes, and I placed the ballast inside the shroud which used to hold the charcoal canister. I had to zip-tie the ballast because the double-sided tape wasn't strong enough. And my bulb fit behind the shield just fine, so I didn't need any spacers.

Not the cleanest job, but I drilled a hole in the top of the shroud for the igniter-to-ballast wire, and then used a saw to cut a line from that hole to the edge between the clutch "cable's" holders, since the hold wasn't big enough for either the ballast or igniter, to get the cable to run through the hole.

Disconnecting the headlamp assembly was straightforward, but I screwed up and drilled my first hole for the rubber grommet in the top of the access plate. It wasn't until I mounted the assembly again that I found that this causes the cables to rub, which is bad when you're dealing with 24,000+ volts. I drilled a new hole in the left side of the headlight assembly itself and this worked great.

The main problem is that the wires are way too damn short, so finding a place to mount the hardware was very limited.

The results? Well, the light flickered badly for about 3 minutes on the first go, which caused the ballast to get very hot, but every start since has been fine and the ballast is only warm to the touch.

The beam pattern is expectedly splotchy but, despite the bulb being a D4S instead of the proper D4R, the cut-off is still there so no oncoming traffic is blinded. If anything, the cut-off is now lower than it was. But I'll adjust that with the screws. Even in the "dark" areas of the slotchiness, the light is still brighter than it was with the stock bulb, so I'm happy with the result overall. It's not perfect, but it's an improvement.

Bonus: It's easier for other drivers to spot that I'm a bike amongst the sea of other lights in their mirrors at night due to the 6000K color temperature.

I just received my DDM, HID headlight bulb kit, and even though I'm a fairly good mechanic (For 40 years!), the sheer number and size of the parts is daunting! Instructions look like they were printed in China too! Hope I can find places to hide all this crap!
Here's what I learned:
The two "naked" tips on the wires which feed through the grommet (along with the other two wires which run to the bulb) are to be connected to the connector which previously was attached to the stock bulb. Make sure that the black wire connects to the other black wire. I wasted 25 minutes because I connected them backwards.

Drill the hole (about 3/4" to 1" in diameter) for the grommet on the left side of the back of the assembly, not on the removable backplate.

The two individual connectors (one male, one female) obviously connect to the similar two wires from the igniter. The longer, combined cable connects to the ballast. Good luck finding mounting points with those short wires.

Make sure that you mount the igniter with the handlebars turned to the least advantageous position. That is to say, make sure that you'll have full range of movement in the handlebars once the bulb-to-igniter wires are connected and the igniter is mounted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The main problem is that the wires are way too damn short, so finding a place to mount the hardware was very limited.
Yes! I finally got the job done, hid the ballast & starter behind the triple trees, in the frame, in front of the airbox with wire ties.
When I first used it, I was having problems with it only working intermittently? Sometimes I’d have to start the bike & shut it down three times, to get the light to come on. They have good Tech people at DDM, but they couldn't quite figure it out either. In time, it seemed to "burn in", and works fine now. A bigger job than I anticipated, but well worth it! On my '07 S4RS, the beam & cut off are perfect, I'm seeing things at night I never saw before, no oncoming drivers have had to flash me yet and I'm glad I did it.
 

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Well, that was quick. POS HID failed in less than 48 hours. I guess I shouldn't have expected better for $18 plus shipping.

It's not even worth the postage it would cost to send it back for replacement.

Looks like I'll be searching for a better-quality kit from another vendor...
 
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