Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a buddy with a 1968 350 Scrambler who's interested in upgrading his front drum brake. He wants to stay period correct, so no discs. I was thinking something along the lines of a twin leading shoe race hub.

Does anyone have any specific recommendations?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,247 Posts
A pretty one that works fairly well would be from British bikes of the same period with twin leading shoes and air scoops.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,211 Posts
That I don't know, but the ones on sale on eBay look very good, although without examining them close up there is no way of knowing how good the quality is. Hitchcock's (RE specialists) are selling them as an upgrade and say that the 2LS was introduced as an improvement by RE.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,247 Posts
When I mentioned British bike brakes I was mainly thinking of the twin leading shoe brakes with air scoops fitted to Triumph and BSA 650’s in the 1960’s. The forks were fairly narrow so they would fit in the available space on a lot of old bikes. They should be pretty easy to come by, relatively speaking. You just need to hook up with the British forums.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,211 Posts
Actually, thinking about it, having seen dozens of racing Ducati Singles, I don't recall any being fitted with anything other than a Japanese TLS front brake, which could be down to weight, width or appearance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
381 Posts
Note from Phil Hitchcock (Road and Race, if you don't know ...), from many moons back:

"You can adapt a Honda CB250/350 or a Yamaha DS7 brake plate into the Ducati hub."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,247 Posts
The air cooled Brit units are much better looking, the Japanese units are probably lighter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,247 Posts
The ‘71 conical hub TLS has a bigger scoop and the hub is lighter, also probably harder to find.
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
459 Posts
The Norton TLS from a Commando is just about the best looking of them all.

Should not be that hard to chase one down.

I worked with Michael at Vintage Brake.

I shipped my wheels to him and he went through them. He found some bad alignments and rectified them. He installed some Ferodo shoes.

I had asked him how much better they would be as I had done all of the upgrades to my 1975 850 MKIII which had discs front and rear.

He said my 71 750 Fastback would stop better than my 850. I was skeptical.

And he was right, the brakes were fantastic.

I recommend trying to work with him before following any other path.

HTH.
 

·
Bon Vivant
Joined
·
10,575 Posts
The Norton TLS from a Commando is just about the best looking of them all.

Should not be that hard to chase one down.

I worked with Michael at Vintage Brake.

I shipped my wheels to him and he went through them. He found some bad alignments and rectified them. He installed some Ferodo shoes.

I had asked him how much better they would be as I had done all of the upgrades to my 1975 850 MKIII which had discs front and rear.

He said my 71 750 Fastback would stop better than my 850. I was skeptical.

And he was right, the brakes were fantastic.

I recommend trying to work with him before following any other path.

HTH.
I think this is the right path. Having your brake "blue printed" willl achieve astonishing results. All drum brakes have a lot more potential, often these brakes from the factory only mate with 20 or 25% contact, when the surfaces are mated so that 85 -100% contact is possible they work amazingly well. I had this done on a BSA with a tiny single shoe brake and it went from seriously scary to confidence inspiring.

I will say that when I was building a duc race bike most of the ducati single racers used a Honda backing plate on the stock Ducati Drum that was machined for full contact.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top