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This may be a welding old wives tale, but I was told not to sand blast prep a part because the imbedded abrasive would "poison the weld". Not sure if he was referring to glass bead, sand, black beauty , or what. This would also relate to using a material dedicated grinding wheel . Who knew ?
 

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Right now, I know 3 others with a 900SS. One is a 1998 FE. The other 2 are the same year as mine, 1993s. Of the 4, including mine, 2 were found to have cracks at the welds on swing arm. Not scientific, I know but that's 50% of people I know personally and of the 1993 models, that's 66%.

Mine was cracked along the weld, where the cast pivot piece is welded into the extruded rectangular tube. It was all but invisible with the old chain lube, and the chain slider in place. The only part that wasn't cracked was the part you could see.

It was cracked across the top, down the inner facing side and across the bottom. Only the bottom was not 100% of the weld distance and it was probably 9/10s of the way across.


Inner facing side and the top.

I had mine welded up and it is now as good as new. I never rode mine on the street before I found the cracks. Just riding it from the trailer to the spot where I started tearing it down I could feel something weird going on....and that was all of a hundred and fifty feet.

That said, another member here had the same thing happen in the same places and he never really knew it was cracked until he visually saw them. I'll let him chime in should he feel like doing so.

When I disassembled mine, I took note of the number of shims present. After reading the factory manual, and how many there were supposed to be, I was left with a question: Did over stacking the shims cause the cracks, or were the extra shims installed because of the feedback the rider felt caused by the cracks?

It isn't like the cracks were easy to find. I washed away all the old chain lube with some mineral spirits and a tooth brush, and never saw them. I removed the chain slider and continued cleaning, still never saw them.

I had a broken off bolt in the pivot pinch point that I needed removed, as well as some damage I needed repaired. My welder asked me to get it clean so it didn't put a bunch of shit into his glass beads. So, I ran it through a steam wash cabinet. I found the cracks when it came out of that. The picture above is right after it came out.

All I know is, from what I experienced in riding the short distance that I did, your description sounds like what I'd describe how it felt......sean
And this is why I want to get my carbon swing arms going...
 

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This may be a welding old wives tale, but I was told not to sand blast prep a part because the imbedded abrasive would "poison the weld". Not sure if he was referring to glass bead, sand, black beauty , or what. This would also relate to using a material dedicated grinding wheel . Who knew ?
Yeah, I dunno. I'm not a professional welder. I can stick two pieces of metal together but that's about as far as it goes for me. I've worked with plenty of professionals though and not heard that "poisoning the weld" bit before. The grinding wheel thing, that I learned as an apprentice.

When I had my swing arm welded, I spoke at length with my welder about what to do, and prep and all that. He bead blasted the entire thing before he started. It is not bare aluminum, despite what some think. It's painted with an aluminum colored paint. So, before welding it (TIG) he stripped off all the paint, and then ground out the cracks in a "V" before welding.

It came out as one would expect it to from a professional welder:
 

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Call me crazy --But I am not spending $250.00 for one damn bolt---It's just a freeking bolt--I'm not saying they are not high quality--But I can find many ways as well to spend my money that will make more of a difference
I believe they have been bought out by another company hence the price hike. That been said I have been led to believe that there will be an alternative product on the market early next year that will be equal if not better than the Nichols engine bolts but with a more realistic price. They are currently been trialled and they also have the light weight flywheels been built at the moment though I have been informed that it is only the injected ones that are been done to begin with.
 

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Discussion Starter #65
It's their website that is screwed up on the price, that is per pair. And there does seem to be some confusion between the manufacturing operation and the people who run sales, but they seem to be the same (multi named) company they always were.
 

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It's their website that is screwed up on the price, that is per pair. And there does seem to be some confusion between the manufacturing operation and the people who run sales, but they seem to be the same (multi named) company they always were.
Yes, they're a Bay Area company. They dabble in motorcycles but they are a fairly significant supplier to the aviation industry. There's Nichols Manufacturing and Nichols Sportsbikes but they're the same place. IE, they have the same address. I don't know if they are separate entities with regard to corporate law though.....sean
 
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