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Discussion Starter #1
I regulary have starting issues, wherby it seems to start when it feels like it!

I have recently had the starter soleniod replaced as that seemed to be an issue and it was good for a few weeks. Then the other night it would not start again so I checked the forum and started by giving the battery a full charge and checked the voltage, which is around 13 volts. It started eventually tonight after a good few atempts, but I wanted to check what others have as a standard full charge. I read here that 14 volts is common on a full charge - is this what I should expect? When running I checked again and it was only reading 13 volts if it makes any difference?

The battery was replaced about a year ago, so before I buy another any advice?

Also if the concensus is a new battery, any advice on the best one to get as I'd rather get one that gives more life!

Thanks

R
 

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Also if the concensus is a new battery, any advice on the best one to get as I'd rather get one that gives more life!
I don't know if you missed the thread, so apologies if you already know:

Lithium ferrophosphate batteries (LiFePO4) last much longer than lead batteries - 1000-2000 full charge cycles compared with ~200 cycles for lead batt's. They are somewhat more expensive per unit, but the unit lasts much longer. In the end, LiFePO4 really costs you only 15-25% of the lead battery price.

In terms of maximum current capacity, you get the same current output with a MUCH lighter battery, too: 800 grams vs. 3+ kilos.

See toobs1234's thread: http://www.ducati.ms/forums/showthread.php?p=482762

You can get by with 4 cells, at around $10 per cell. You can get the cells for less than that if you dig a bit. Ideally you'll want 8 cells and a balancer. I believe $100 is the upper limit here for a REAL nice battery.
 

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I regulary have starting issues, wherby it seems to start when it feels like it!

I have recently had the starter soleniod replaced as that seemed to be an issue and it was good for a few weeks. Then the other night it would not start again so I checked the forum and started by giving the battery a full charge and checked the voltage, which is around 13 volts. It started eventually tonight after a good few atempts, but I wanted to check what others have as a standard full charge. I read here that 14 volts is common on a full charge - is this what I should expect? When running I checked again and it was only reading 13 volts if it makes any difference?

The battery was replaced about a year ago, so before I buy another any advice?

Also if the concensus is a new battery, any advice on the best one to get as I'd rather get one that gives more life!

Thanks

R
Your battery sounds fine, although a load test is the only sure test.

Your battery voltage question sounds a little confused. Your resting battery voltage should only be something over 12 volts, but right after being on a charger it will measure over 13. That is not it's "real" charge, and if you let it rest for 1/2 hour or more, it will settle out to something more like 12.5 or so.

Up in the 14's you're talking about the charging voltage that the bike's system creates to charge your battery back up, but it's not the voltage that the battery itself can provide.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
To be honest I am a bit confused! From what you say the battery is probably good...so still other gremlins!

How do you do a load test?

Thanks

R

Your battery sounds fine, although a load test is the only sure test.

Your battery voltage question sounds a little confused. Your resting battery voltage should only be something over 12 volts, but right after being on a charger it will measure over 13. That is not it's "real" charge, and if you let it rest for 1/2 hour or more, it will settle out to something more like 12.5 or so.

Up in the 14's you're talking about the charging voltage that the bike's system creates to charge your battery back up, but it's not the voltage that the battery itself can provide.
 

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There's an inexpensive device that does it. Basically, your battery runs current through a giant resistor for a measured number of seconds, and you see how much your voltage drops.

Anyplace that sells batteries usually has a load tester. You have to make sure the battery has a full charge on it before you do the test or you can get a false "bad" result.

The reason for load testing is because a weak battery can still show acceptable voltage, but no longer be able to supply the large amperage needed for starting.


If you had the problem before you got this battery, then that's probably not the problem.
 
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