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I need to replace my battery but can’t remove the dern plastic strap that holds it in place. The head of the bolt is fine but the threading underneath is just spinning in place. I can’t figure out how to access it. I read one or two other instances of this happening on other Ducatis but no clear resolution. Any ideas? FML....
 

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Happened to me on my ENDURO, simple fix cut the plastic strap with whatever you have dremel, hacksaw, air cutoff.

It's not really needed once the seat is put back on IMHO

Ducati replaced my whole seat pan 6 months later under warranty.
 

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I had this happen on my 2011, the brass thread insert is spinning in the plastic. My solution was to drill out the bolt and then do the same with the brass thread insert. Then install a rivnut and install the strap with another bolt same as the original.
 

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Damnit. Mine just went spinning too (2017). Poor way to start off step one of a 40 step project! Ugh.
I'm guessing post dealer-install charging pigtail since I've not been into this yet myself. I put significant leverage under the strap while turning and the captured nut below still turns with the bolt.
Any other solutions before I take a drill to this bolt??

1005417
 

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The bolt is now out. First tried a trick I read elsewhere in this forum relative to the nuts captured in the tank for the forward fairing sections. It involves spinning the nut to generate heat and prying out of the melting plastic. FWIW, it does generate significant heat but does not pop the nut in this location. In as little as 10 seconds of spinning there was enough heat to burn a finger (after, not during!), but the nut stayed put. I used significant prying pressure (a LOT) at the same time while spinning the bolt, and besides the finger it only began melting the plastic on the top of the plastic strap. The nut must have a lip around the edge.
Since the bolt was spinning with the drill as well, I was able to hold the edge of the it with a multi-tool (by this I mean a screwdriver) and drilled it out without much further drama. Will have to toss the strap or drill out and replace the nut later.

1005467
1005468
 

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Good you are getting practice at it as this will be the future for most modern Ducati's. I see bikes that are 5 years old and older at my shop mostly and you can see the generation where Ducati started using captured nuts in plastic as the beginning of this. It may be the plastic is the thing that changed as old airbox's from the 90's and older do not suffer from this but starting early 2000's seized bolts and spinning nuts in plastic became common.

It is worst when it is the fuel tank where it happens and often it is found at the first fuel filter change, often well out of warranty. I do think they may have improved it on the newer bikes as I think Ducati finally may have moved the fuel pump flange to the top of the tank like BMW did years ago. A battery strap is a pain but I am sure you can come up with a solution that will be acceptable.

Just a bit of advice based on what I see. With age the plastic will lose its hold on the insert this is just normal for the plastic as it changes shape and durability(rigidity) with age, just a fact of life for these bikes. Knowing that help yourself by NOT over tightening fasteners, if it is a body panel or something like a battery strap maybe some very low strength loctite (purple). If it is a non-critical fastener I would rather replace a single missing screw than ruin a panel or fuel tank. Obviously you need to use common sense as to which ones are critical and if you are not sure ask someone who knows.

If you do not work on the bike yourself request this be done and consider the cost savings of not paying a shop a ton of time removing stuck fasteners. They may not want to go too low and I fully respect that but you are just looking for that mix of anti corrosion (loctite helps with this) as well as tight enough to do the job and no more.
 
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