Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner
  • Hey Everyone! Enter your bike HERE to be a part of this months Bike of the Month Challenge!

1 - 20 of 37 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Want to replace battery on SFS. I tried searching for the right thread but only related one was quite old.

First question, where is the battery located and how to access it?

Second question, which battery is recommended is the best option?

Battery is too weak and I don't want to thrash the stater.

TY and Happy New Year!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
349 Posts
Want to replace battery on SFS. I tried searching for the right thread but only related one was quite old.

First question, where is the battery located and how to access it?

Second question, which battery is recommended is the best option?

Battery is too weak and I don't want to thrash the stater.

TY and Happy New Year!
I think they're under the seat on your bike... where that big bulge is you can see under the tail section. Owner's manual should show pics and instructions on how to get there, if you have one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I never got the owner's manuals with the bike (which is another question - does anyone have any or are there pdf file that I can download?)

I removed the seat and took the rear section apart. Found what I believe is a battery, some sort of power source for sure, see pics. Electric tape on battery leads ?? :surprise: Now the battery is so weak it will barely turn over. I don't want to fry the stator, was hoping something I can do in my garage...

Will disconnecting the battery require and resets to the bike's electronic system and does it affect the ECU? What is the best battery to install?
 

Attachments

·
Bon Vivant
Joined
·
11,450 Posts
That is not the factory battery - it looks like it might be a lithium pack. I know a lot of guys here use modern lithium batteries in their bikes but there is a reason you still dont see them supplied by the majority of manufacturers. Some are dangerous and can combust under certain conditions, some dont charge fully with a stator system and a regulator fault resulting in over-voltage could cause an explosion. Its very important for lithium systems to be balanced and that requires a special charger and special connections that isolate, monitor and regulate the charging of each cell. Lithium batteries will fail if they are allowed to drop voltage below a certain threshold or when they are over-charged, so it is very important to continually check them and keep them charged within those parameters. I dont know which lithium systems have built-in monitoring or charging circuits so for me it's too much hassle and possible danger to risk, I'm sure that at some point, these systems will become standard, but until they do and until all of the kinks are worked out I stay with OEM replacement AGM or Gel cell batteries.

If I were you I'd replace it with the OEM battery - Yuasa 12B-BS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
495 Posts
If I were you I'd replace it with the OEM battery - Yuasa 12B-BS
I agree that whatever it is you have should be replaced. But I would make sure that the new battery is an AGM (absorbed glass mat) battery and not a standard lead acid battery, the latter of which is virtually a thing of the past. The AGM's don't leak, hold a charge longer and maintain voltage level longer. The newer "sensing" chargers - of which there are many and reasonably cheap - are perfect for keeping these things up and can be left hooked to the battery. While you're at it, install an external charge lead, zip tied to the frame away from moving parts so you can keep the bike charged w/o having to take it all apart.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I was in a bit of a shock (pun intended) when I saw battery terminals connections secured with electric tape, like WTF :confused:

I am definitely going with a suggestion to go stock. I bought batteries, mainly Optima, from Battery Mart. It doesn't look like they carry Yuasa, but this substitute:https://www.batterymart.com/p-YT12B-BS-AGM-Maintenance-Free-Battery.html

Anyone has recommendation for a recommended vendor?
 

·
Excel Addict
2001 900SSie
Joined
·
5,345 Posts
I was in a bit of a shock (pun intended) when I saw battery terminals connections secured with electric tape, like WTF :confused:

I am definitely going with a suggestion to go stock. I bought batteries, mainly Optima, from Battery Mart. It doesn't look like they carry Yuasa, but this substitute:https://www.batterymart.com/p-YT12B-BS-AGM-Maintenance-Free-Battery.html

Anyone has recommendation for a recommended vendor?
When looking at alternatives, I suggest you also look at the CCA = cranking Amps.
I am about to buy a new battery and even with the same code, there can be significant differences.

As has been written in other threads, a "good" lithium battery has its own internal Battery Management System (BMS)
The danger or otherwise of a Li Ion battery depends on the technology inside.
They do not like cold or hot temperatures for charge and discharge.
Some below 10 deg Celsius seriously limit the charge rate.

Others have reported, not me as I do not have Lithium in my bike, that they turn the key on and wait with the headlight on, so the battery warms a bit before attempting to crank/start.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for pointing that out Richard. It completely escaped my attention. The Yuasa clone has 20 CCA less than genuine Yuasa. I believe that you get what you pay for...
 

·
Bon Vivant
Joined
·
11,450 Posts
You might also try a Shorai or similar.
I doin't know what that is, and would recycle it.

Shorai is a lithium pack and requires a special cell balancing charger to keep it in peak operating condition, the cells will not balance on the bike. A lot of people use them and swear by them. I honestly don't know if any lithium battery, even with a built-in management system, is capable of balancing the cells while using the on-board regulator charging system.


By the way I fly huge extremely sophisticated model aircraft and the servos and radio systems all use lithium batteries so I'm very familiar with their use and their different chemistries and requirements. I spend a lot of time cycling and caring for the lithium systems in these planes and understand the dangers and failure points. I've been working with these battery systems for over 20 years. This is why I dont use them in my motorcycles.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,124 Posts
It looks to me like some dodgy bastard has stuffed foam around and badly cabled and sub standard battery just to get it over the line and flog it.
I'd get a decent one on before you torch the bike and possibly your house-self (delete as appropriate)

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
It looks to me like some dodgy bastard has stuffed foam around and badly cabled and sub standard battery just to get it over the line and flog it.
I'd get a decent one on before you torch the bike and possibly your house-self (delete as appropriate)

Sent from my SM-G965F using Tapatalk
Help is on the way, thanks for all good recommendations. The Mickey Mouse wiring did piss me off, considering that the bike came from a pretty nice collection.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,357 Posts
I'd cut the previous owner a little slack. Rather than hack up the stock battery cables to fit his non-OEM lithium battery, he probably bolted on a short set of "adaptor" cables with the proper terminals for the lithium battery, taped the bejesus out of the connections and went for a ride. That way if you want to use a stock battery you don't have to replace any cables. The foam around the lithium battery serves two purposes: first it fills up the empty space due to the battery being significantly smaller than stock and secondly it provides some insulation - lithium batteries do not like cold and their amp output drops precipitously with temperature.

As far as lead acid batteries being a thing of the past, I would politely disagree. They are still the cheapest way to store the most power, which is why they ship as stock equipment in virtually every car, truck, and motorbike sold. Sealed lead-acide batteries (SLA's) are comparable in shock-resistance and durability to AGM's. Unlike fighter planes, for which AGM battery technology was developed, your motorbike will never (hopefully) need to fly upside down or on its' side so liquid electrolyte batteries are a viable option. I'd hazard to say that most people on this type of forum who switch to an alternative battery type, be it AGM or lithium or dilithium crystals, do so for weight savings. As others have noted, lithium batteries do not have the capability to load-balance charging across cells; the required chargers are manufacturer-specific or battery-specific and cost a few hundred bucks. I don't know whether or not a different regulator is required on the bike as the OEM charging system is not designed for individually charging cells in a lithium stack.

Unless you are trying to shave off a few grams, I'd suggest that perhaps an OEM LA/SLA battery will work just fine. And it will save you a significant amount of money.
 

·
Retired Pipe Polisher C2H6O+
Joined
·
19,081 Posts
A few grams? Seriously? How about 7 pounds?

Enough with the technical theory. I have Shorai in all 5 of my bikes. A couple for around 5 years or so with zero issues.

For the most part these batteries never need a charger. The exception being on bikes that have a parasitic loss due to security systems and such. My 999 which is rarely ever ridden is such a case. For this bike I keep a standard Battery Tender on it and once a month I turn it on until the charger shows a full charge then turn it off. This is the oldest Shorai I have and still spins the starter noticeably faster than any lead-acid battery.

The only negative I’ve come across with these batteries is they don’t like cold weather.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,357 Posts
A few grams? Seriously? How about 7 pounds?
I rest my case. As I guessed, weight loss was the driving factor. It's not a bad thing, it's just not something that everyone wants to spend money on. Lithium batteries cost a lot more to do the same thing as lead acid.

No intent to offend, everyone needs to make their own call on the lighter and more expensive vs. heavier and cheaper. YMMV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
That's an old Speedcell lithium battery.

Alternatively, if you have an Interstate Battery center nearby, their powersports batteries are made by Yuasa. Let them prep and charge it for you, that's half the battle in terms of longevity. The other half is on you, invest in a smart charger.

For the average street rider, AGM is more than enough but lithium serves a purpose too.
 

·
Retired Pipe Polisher C2H6O+
Joined
·
19,081 Posts
I rest my case. As I guessed, weight loss was the driving factor. It's not a bad thing, it's just not something that everyone wants to spend money on. Lithium batteries cost a lot more to do the same thing as lead acid.



No intent to offend, everyone needs to make their own call on the lighter and more expensive vs. heavier and cheaper. YMMV.


Let’s just try not to grossly exaggerate to make a point. 7 lbs is not just a few grams.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
I'd cut the previous owner a little slack. Rather than hack up the stock battery cables to fit his non-OEM lithium battery, he probably bolted on a short set of "adaptor" cables with the proper terminals for the lithium battery, taped the bejesus out of the connections and went for a ride. That way if you want to use a stock battery you don't have to replace any cables. The foam around the lithium battery serves two purposes: first it fills up the empty space due to the battery being significantly smaller than stock and secondly it provides some insulation - lithium batteries do not like cold and their amp output drops precipitously with temperature.

As far as lead acid batteries being a thing of the past, I would politely disagree. They are still the cheapest way to store the most power, which is why they ship as stock equipment in virtually every car, truck, and motorbike sold. Sealed lead-acide batteries (SLA's) are comparable in shock-resistance and durability to AGM's. Unlike fighter planes, for which AGM battery technology was developed, your motorbike will never (hopefully) need to fly upside down or on its' side so liquid electrolyte batteries are a viable option. I'd hazard to say that most people on this type of forum who switch to an alternative battery type, be it AGM or lithium or dilithium crystals, do so for weight savings. As others have noted, lithium batteries do not have the capability to load-balance charging across cells; the required chargers are manufacturer-specific or battery-specific and cost a few hundred bucks. I don't know whether or not a different regulator is required on the bike as the OEM charging system is not designed for individually charging cells in a lithium stack.

Unless you are trying to shave off a few grams, I'd suggest that perhaps an OEM LA/SLA battery will work just fine. And it will save you a significant amount of money.
Lets face it, manufacturers usually just stick the cheapest battery they can in because it is the easiest spot to save some bucks.
 
1 - 20 of 37 Posts
Top