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My bike is exactly 3 years old with no hint of battery problems. I had trouble starting it this morning (engine cranking but no start) until it finally turned over. After a short ride, I had the same problem starting up again.

I put the bike on a Genius battery tender and after just 20 minutes, it showed a full charge. While still hooked to the tender, I tried starting and had the same problem. When I looked at the charge indicator on the tender, it was already down to 75%.

I'm not sure whether this is a battery issue or something else. But three years on a battery is longer than I've ever gotten before on my other bikes, so I wondering whether it's time to change it. I'm about to leave on a 2000 mi. ride. (I guess that answers my question.)

All input will be appreciated.:confused:
 

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In my experience there is a huge range in life of motorcycle batteries, but 3 years seems a bit short.
I had my Diavel OEM battery in for 7 years before it started to degrade as you describe.
I just changed my '13 MTS OEM battery a few weeks ago (so 6 years) - same symptoms again.

I suspect that there are a lot of factors contributing to battery life - as there are with chain life.

You have indeed answered your own question though - change it!

The question is will you go Lithium or not?

I went Lithium and am happy with the lower cranking time and increased charge retention time.
 

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3 years isn't too bad. I've gotten 4 and 5 years before. Here in the mid atlantic, the winter off season sees the bike on tender for several months, bike is in an unheated garage. 2 seasons ago I put a lithium battery in my Multi so I'm real curious to see how long it will last. It for sure cranks the motor quicker (I should say turns it at a faster rpm).
So yeah, after 3 years and some issues, put a new battery in there and see if it fires quicker. No shop would look into a start issue without making sure the battery is fresh first.
 

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Beating on Batteries

As the other respondents have stated, there are several factors that influence the total life of a motorcycle battery. Here in Wisconsin, we subject batteries to some of the harshest extremes both in use and in storage. While I have been diligent in my pursuit to prolong the life of a consumable such as a battery, the cold, hard truth here is, 3 years is a good deal.
However, there is one problem I have found on several bikes including Ducati. Intermittent or bad (poorly attached) ground to battery. This can often be found by inspecting the ground cable where it attaches to the battery for any pitting or bluing of the connector. Pitting is caused from arcing and bluing is often caused as a result of that arcing causing heat damage to the metal.
Making sure those connections are not only tight, but with proper locking hardware insure a good connection. A small dab of dielectric grease never hurt any battery connection.
Checking to make sure the charger dongle has good connection is also important. many "Smart" chargers will default to a "fully Charged " mode after only a few minutes if there is a poor (or intermittent) ground.
At the end of the day, based on the generally inherent "cost of ownership" associated with these bikes, I'd say a fresh, good quality battery is just a routine maintenance item.
Batteries are like fish......good fish ain't cheap, and cheap fish ain't good.
Hope this helps
 

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Between all of my bikes that had the original factory battery when I got it, they lasted pretty long...over 10 years on average. I kept a tender on each. The aftermarket replacement batteries I've purchased only lasted about half that. I'll see about the Ducati factory battery in my Multi. At least it is a Yuasa, which has served me well in my other rides.
 

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@Sq51lacfd
Here in Ontario, I've had similar lifespan out of the OEM Yusua. 3 years and the Panigale's battery was dead. My Monster's is also on it's last leg. Our Sea-Doo Yuasa's have fared a bit longer at 4 years on average. All are on tender during the winter. For this current Multistrada, I upgraded to an Anti-Gravity Lithium prior to taking delivery of the bike. We'll see how that goes in the years to come.
 

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Have had my Monster for almost 2 years, is a 2014 and I think has the original battery.
Changing it sounds like a real pita. Take off the seat, it's not there.
It is down low, and has to be removed from below, or something. :rolleyes:
 

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My ‘12 stock battery lasted five years.

Should have replaced it the day I bought the bike.

My EarthX makes the bike start easier/struggle less.


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My ‘12 stock battery lasted five years.
Should have replaced it the day I bought the bike.
My EarthX makes the bike start easier/struggle less.
The cranking amps on the Lithium is much greater than the OEM Lead Acid.
Quite a bit of weight saving also, especially being at the top of the bike.
 

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The cranking amps on the Lithium is much greater than the OEM Lead Acid.
Quite a bit of weight saving also, especially being at the top of the bike.
Only issue with Li is they don't like cold... if you're in the south or only ride when it's warm they're a no-brainer imo, but if you like to ride when it's cold you may be better off with old school.
 

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Only issue with Li is they don't like cold... if you're in the south or only ride when it's warm they're a no-brainer imo, but if you like to ride when it's cold you may be better off with old school.
I do not believe this at all, both from personal experience and from a scientific perspective.

All batteries will perform poorly in cold weather, regardless of whether they are lithium or lead-acid. In fact, a lithium battery will still outperform a comparably-sized lead-acid when the temperature drops. Cold temperature increase the internal resistance and lowers the capacity. A battery that provides 100 percent capacity at 27°C (80°F) will typically deliver only 50 percent at –18°C (0°F). ... All batteries achieve optimum service life if used at 20°C (68°F) or slightly below

https://www.lithiumpros.com/blog/how-does-cold-weather-affect-lithium-batteries/
 

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Still using my stock battery.. 2010 MTS1200s. But I do put it on a tender when Im not running the bike for 3-4 Days. Easy peasy once you have a quickconnect installed.
 

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Only issue with Li is they don't like cold... if you're in the south or only ride when it's warm they're a no-brainer imo, but if you like to ride when it's cold you may be better off with old school.
I've read that about LIon as well in addition to them needing a 30~60s charge to wake up.
Notwithstanding, all this is somewhat or totally offset by the doubling of the cranking amps.
480ca vs 210ca.
It's currently 1°C right now here in Ottawa. The Multi started immediately and this without waking-up the battery.
I'll be testing this periodically as it gets colder.
 

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These Ducatis are tough to crank. It's not holding a full charge so you're starting to see degradation in battery life. Change it now rather than wait until it fails hard while you're away from home. Just not worth the risk.
BTW mine is 3 years and still fine but I keep it on a Battery Tender. I think my next battery will be a lithium. Much lighter and better cranking power. My Yamaha battery is probably about 6 years old and still going. But it's not as hard on the battery as my Multi.
 

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I do not believe this at all, both from personal experience and from a scientific perspective.

All batteries will perform poorly in cold weather, regardless of whether they are lithium or lead-acid. In fact, a lithium battery will still outperform a comparably-sized lead-acid when the temperature drops. Cold temperature increase the internal resistance and lowers the capacity. A battery that provides 100 percent capacity at 27°C (80°F) will typically deliver only 50 percent at –18°C (0°F). ... All batteries achieve optimum service life if used at 20°C (68°F) or slightly below

https://www.lithiumpros.com/blog/how-does-cold-weather-affect-lithium-batteries/
Li batteries DO have poor cold weather performance. Just check the Tesla forums and read about loss of range in cold weather.

Now that doesn't mean they won't work... but it is something to be aware of if you live in the North. Cold will reduce capacity as well as affecting charging and peak charge (and an increased potential for damage under high load for multi-cell Li-ion batteries). Lead acid batteries are also affected by the cold but as long as they have charge they don't have the same risk of damage.
 

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Li batteries DO have poor cold weather performance. Just check the Tesla forums and read about loss of range in cold weather.

Now that doesn't mean they won't work... but it is something to be aware of if you live in the North. Cold will reduce capacity as well as affecting charging and peak charge (and an increased potential for damage under high load for multi-cell Li-ion batteries). Lead acid batteries are also affected by the cold but as long as they have charge they don't have the same risk of damage.
Absolutely Li batteries suffer when it’s cold. I have them in 4 of my six bikes and it’s very noticeable when the temp drops into the 40’s. Especially the Monster and the 999. But living in Texas it’s not much of a problem. The trick is to put a load on the battery by turning the key on and let it sit for a while with the headlight on. After that it will start. Barely. :)


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Ask all the Lead Acid battery EV car drivers about their cold weather performance...............oh wait!
 

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Let's make a distinction between "Starting and Turning-Over" where this later is the operative word. I also have a Monster with a lead-acid Yuasa and although it "Turns-Over", it's a cold-blooded beast to start.

As mentioned yesterday, the temperature here was near freezing at 1°C and the Multistrada with a Lithium Battery "Turned-Over" quickly and fired up immediately. That temperature experiment relieved all of my apprehensions about Lithium Batteries for a motorcycle.
Notwithstanding, I personally would not put the current technology of Lithium batteries in a car where it needs to "Turn-Over" at -20°C. However, this is a motorcycle forum and I doubt any of us ride at these extreme low freezing temperatures.
 

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I think that's a great rationale response there.
The point is that the assumption that there is some kind imaginary Mason-Dixie type line across the US where south of which Lithium is OK and north of which you should use Lead Acid, misses the holistic picture of their use in motorcycles.
 
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