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I'd like to get some pegs like this... Carlin has no issues hanging off the bike. Notice they seem to be adjusted all the way up, which would put my knee higher up on the tank.


I have em' - "Ducati Designs" I think, put em on my Hyper and Multi-
 

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Quoted myself above, just to keep my next post in context...

I've advanced since my last question and wanted to share my revelations!...

I watched the Twist Of The Wrist II DVD twice. The second time through I took some notes on what I felt were things most relevant to me and the problems I experienced.

1) The most major issue that I was having was, something I feel totally stupid about, after many years of riding! I TOTALLY misunderstood what "push left to go left, and push right to go right meant". I always thought that "push" meant to push down on the grip in order to make the bike lean; wrong! I was totally shocked to learn that pushing on the right grip in the horizontal plane, turning the bars to the left, is what makes the bike lean to the right! I wonder how many others misconstrued this. I spoke to 2 of my riding buddies and one of them had the correct understanding and the other did not, so maybe this is a common misunderstanding.

2) The second major issue that I had was being tight on the bars. I know now, that (along with poor throttle control) is what caused the rear wheel to get loose sometimes. I practiced gripping the tank with my legs, and to be light on the bars. That along with proper counter-steering technique solved most of my immediate problems, made the bike more stable, and made me a MUCH more confident rider.

3) I always turned in too early. After watching the video I learned about picking a turn in point, how to drive towards the turn in point, and how to look through the turn to find my apex while not turning yet. This made a huge difference.

4) Finally, while I did understand good throttle control, I could never practice it well due to the above reasons.

Yesterday I rode for 6 hours, practiced all these things, and WOW!!!!!!!!! Holy crap! WOW! I think I improved my riding by about 200%. I can't believe it. My inner thighs are a bit sore, which is a good sign! ;)

Now, I am having an issue with hanging off the bike. On my Multistrada, when I put one cheek off, or even half a cheek off, I don't feel like stable being supported by my outside leg. So, I could use a pointer or two from Keith and maybe some other Multistrada riders on this.
gg48gg,

Oh wow, I can't believe that so much time has passed and this has gone unanswered, very sorry about that for some reason I stopped getting notifications on posts for ducati.ms

As far as hanging off goes, it's often a case of less is more. Less butt off the seat, allows for a stable body position which equals better control and less effort being misdirected into the bars.

Certainly tank grip material, like Stomp, is a huge help in the fight to maintain lower body stability. They are just now coming out with an even more aggressive 'volcano' pattern which you might want to check out.

Rather than trying to focus on how far you are hung off, it's more efficient to focus on how far down and forward you get your torso. At the moment what I see in the photos is a rather more upright position. Don't try to get on the tank but see if you can get half way there.

Thanks for the notes on your wins using the Twist II DVD, I love that.

Keith
 

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The "Lean/Slide" bike I got to ride in L2 absolutely gave me a great base to begin with as far as body positioning goes well before I had a chance to develop bad BP habits. Pretty revolutionary way of addressing multiple issues a rider may have in real time.

Looking forward to L3/4 @ Streets of Willow next month!

-Christian
 

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Keeping turn in point in mind

So, I've scanned the road going to a corner, selected what I think is a good turn in point, and am now looking into the corner. And, at that point, my brain says, "Hey, dummy, you aren't looking where your turn in point is anymore. Meow the [email protected]@ do you know where it is and whether you'll go beyond it and run into the rock wall to your right??" Followed by, "Hey, dummy, stop looking into the turn and find that turn in point, or else turn NOW so you don't hit the rock wall!!"

At which point either I turn too soon, or I look back to find the turn in point, or .... No matter what, it's not smooth.

I've watched and read Twist, understand the turn in points, but my brain keeps acting like a ninny on this.

Any suggestions?

Thanks.

Joe
 

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So, I've scanned the road going to a corner, selected what I think is a good turn in point, and am now looking into the corner. And, at that point, my brain says, "Hey, dummy, you aren't looking where your turn in point is anymore. Meow the [email protected]@ do you know where it is and whether you'll go beyond it and run into the rock wall to your right??" Followed by, "Hey, dummy, stop looking into the turn and find that turn in point, or else turn NOW so you don't hit the rock wall!!"

At which point either I turn too soon, or I look back to find the turn in point, or .... No matter what, it's not smooth.

I've watched and read Twist, understand the turn in points, but my brain keeps acting like a ninny on this.

Any suggestions?

Thanks.

Joe
Yes.

Sounds suspiciously like you are looking in too early. But the first question is: when you look in, what are you looking for? OR, Where are you looking? Same question phrased two ways.

Keith
 

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Yes.

Sounds suspiciously like you are looking in too early. But the first question is: when you look in, what are you looking for? OR, Where are you looking? Same question phrased two ways.

Keith
I look for a spot on the road -- typically towards the outside of the lane -- where I plan to do my press on the inside grip. Once I spot that, I then look in, but have that nagging "will my wheels go past it and I'll run into the wall or off the cliff or do something dumb that will . . . ".
 

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I look for a spot on the road -- typically towards the outside of the lane -- where I plan to do my press on the inside grip. Once I spot that, I then look in, but have that nagging "will my wheels go past it and I'll run into the wall or off the cliff or do something dumb that will . . . ".
Maybe I wasn't clear. AFTER you spot your turn in point, where are you looking when you look into the turn?

Keith
 

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Maybe I wasn't clear. AFTER you spot your turn in point, where are you looking when you look into the turn?

Keith
Sorry

I suspect I'm sort of looking vaguely into where I want to go, although sometimes I am looking at a point where I can't actually see where I want to go -- exit point or wherever -- because my vision is blocked. I suspect I"m not terribly focussed at that point.
 

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Sorry

I suspect I'm sort of looking vaguely into where I want to go, although sometimes I am looking at a point where I can't actually see where I want to go -- exit point or wherever -- because my vision is blocked. I suspect I"m not terribly focussed at that point.
Do you have your Twist, Vol 2 book handy? If yes, reread the Two Step section, Chapter 23 and look at the diagram on page 100 at the top of the page. Then, tell me where you should be looking. It's sounds rather vague as you describe it above and it shouldn't be vague at all.

Keith
 

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Do you have your Twist, Vol 2 book handy? If yes, reread the Two Step section, Chapter 23 and look at the diagram on page 100 at the top of the page. Then, tell me where you should be looking. It's sounds rather vague as you describe it above and it shouldn't be vague at all.

Keith
It's that last paragraph on page 99 that is getting me.
 

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It's that last paragraph on page 99 that is getting me.
One thing at a time please. Where are you supposed to be looking according to the illustration on page 100? Answer that.

And one other question: What is your que to begin your look into the turn? What would happen if you begin looking in too early? That's two more questions.

On your question about the last paragraph on page 99, read the thrid paragraph on page 100 and see if that helps.

Keith
 

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One thing at a time please. Where are you supposed to be looking according to the illustration on page 100? Answer that.

And one other question: What is your que to begin your look into the turn? What would happen if you begin looking in too early? That's two more questions.

On your question about the last paragraph on page 99, read the thrid paragraph on page 100 and see if that helps.

Keith
Looking at mid-turn target. But only as I get real near the turn-in point, right?

That's the cue? Just before hitting the turn in point?

And, as the bike follows where you look, if you look too soon, you turn in too soon? Ahhhhhh.

But, the last sentence of the second para. on page 100 -- talks about "looking-in early paves the way for getting back on the throttle sooner . . . " Which would lead me (who thinks if a little of something is good, a lot of it is better) to think I should look in real early. But I shouldn't, right?

Joe
 

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Looking at mid-turn target. But only as I get real near the turn-in point, right?

That's the cue? Just before hitting the turn in point?

And, as the bike follows where you look, if you look too soon, you turn in too soon? Ahhhhhh.

But, the last sentence of the second para. on page 100 -- talks about "looking-in early paves the way for getting back on the throttle sooner . . . " Which would lead me (who thinks if a little of something is good, a lot of it is better) to think I should look in real early. But I shouldn't, right?

Joe
Yes, you got it on when to look in and what to look for. Perfect.

It says "paves the way" it doesn't say to get back on the gas when you look in. When you know where you are going it generally gives more confidence to get back to the gas earlier but only after the bike is at its final lean.

The reference for that is on page page 25. The paragraph heading is "HOW?"

Keith
 

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Thanks for your previous reply Keith, about hanging off and "less is sometimes more." I will give that a shot. I feel pretty confident about my counter steering, turn in points, and throttle control.

I'm a bit confused, though, about your responses to FiveG. Why not look into the turn while still driving towards your turn-in point? Why is looking (without unnecessarily turning) a bad thing?
 

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Thanks for your previous reply Keith, about hanging off and "less is sometimes more." I will give that a shot. I feel pretty confident about my counter steering, turn in points, and throttle control.

I'm a bit confused, though, about your responses to FiveG. Why not look into the turn while still driving towards your turn-in point? Why is looking (without unnecessarily turning) a bad thing?
gg48gg,

That's exactly what he is doing and what I said was correct. Line up your turn-in point and when you know you are going to hit it, look in to locate your apex, just what 5G said. Read Chapter 23, "The Two Step" in Twist II and you'll see that's what the Two-Step technique is all about.

Keith
 

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Hard to beleive!!

gg48gg,

That's exactly what he is doing and what I said was correct. Line up your turn-in point and when you know you are going to hit it, look in to locate your apex, just what 5G said. Read Chapter 23, "The Two Step" in Twist II and you'll see that's what the Two-Step technique is all about.

Keith

Blows me away!!! Keith Code's first reply to this Forum Thread was Dec. 17, 2006!!! As of today, Mar. 19, 2014, there have been almost 90,000 views, and 555 replies!!! Got to be a Forum "Record"!!! More impressive is the fact that I first read ("studied") "A Twist od the Wrist" sometime around 1980 (when it was first published), maybe early 80s!!! I have passed that original book done to my sons who have all been on race tracks, on Ducatis. Hard to believe it has been that long, and sooo many motorcycle racing miles!! Thanks Keith Code, it has been a real pleasure..... as well as a gr8 education!!

Bob Ramsbottom
 

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Blows me away!!! Keith Code's first reply to this Forum Thread was Dec. 17, 2006!!! As of today, Mar. 19, 2014, there have been almost 90,000 views, and 555 replies!!! Got to be a Forum "Record"!!! More impressive is the fact that I first read ("studied") "A Twist od the Wrist" sometime around 1980 (when it was first published), maybe early 80s!!! I have passed that original book done to my sons who have all been on race tracks, on Ducatis. Hard to believe it has been that long, and sooo many motorcycle racing miles!! Thanks Keith Code, it has been a real pleasure..... as well as a gr8 education!!

Bob Ramsbottom
Stories like that make it all worthwhile. Thanks Bob.

Keith
 

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Stories like that make it all worthwhile. Thanks Bob.

Keith
You are quite welcome. I should have added, that the lesson to be learned is one (in my opinion) of safety. The more you learn about the mechanics of racing a purpose built motorcycle, the ultimate goal is not about quicker lap times, (although that is fun), it is about racing a motorcycle on a great track, and understanding how to do it safely, for you, and your fellow racers. I have crashed, (over the last 3.5 decades), more times than I can remember. During this time I have grown very appreciative of how to race safely. At sixty-seven years of age this concept has allowed me to continue the sport I truly love. And it is truly an honor to thank the folks, like you Keith Code, who have educated us, those of us who share this love of road racing motorcycles, to still be heading to the next race,... and looking forward to it as a child waking up on Christmas morning. See you at the next race!!

Bob Ramsbottom
AHRMA BOT F1/F2 # R77 Ducati 1098R.... (this year an 848,...... uh,.... a bit safer!!!)
 

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And this knowledge makes one a much safer street rider as well.

Understanding a bike's capabilities and limits allows one to ride with a much greater reserve at all times. Taking a corner at 45 MPH at 4/10s of one's ability, rather than 8/10s, is a wonderful luxury and makes everyone on the road safer.

I, too, bought my copy of the original Twist of the Wrist in the early 1980's. :)
 

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gg48gg,

That's exactly what he is doing and what I said was correct. Line up your turn-in point and when you know you are going to hit it, look in to locate your apex, just what 5G said. Read Chapter 23, "The Two Step" in Twist II and you'll see that's what the Two-Step technique is all about.

Keith
Thanks for clarifying for me Keith. Your contributions here in this forum and to motorcycle education in general are greatly appreciated.
 
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