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Discussion Starter #1
I did a search but it seems like everyone on the forum is running PR5. I'm curious about the Power RS and the MTS1200. Any opinions?

I've run Scorpion Trial, Angel GT and PR3, PR4 and PR5. I've never made it through a set of those models without severe cupping that required replacement before the tread wore down. I'm looking at tires with a less aggressive tread pattern to try to avoid this.
 

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The Power RS is a more sporting, track day capable tire than what you’ve been using. A lot of people like them for their intended use but they won’t last very long and I’ve seen many cases of the rear tire developing funny wear patterns in the areas where the different compounds meet. It doesn’t seem to hurt the on track performance but looks funky to me.


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Personally, I'd hazard you're running improper tyre pressures if you're having issues across that many different brands/models.

FWIW, I've got more than 20,000km out of a PR3 rear on my R1 before.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes, let's stay on point here. Just looking for opinions on the RS tires. I've been riding many years and am obsessive about bike maintenance and tire pressures.
 

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I was using PP3 on my '12 MTS since I got rid of the OEM Scorpion and the rear usually lasted about 7-8k kms (the front yielded about double of it) including a couple of track days per rear. Last time I changed the rear my dealer run out of PP3 and offered the new RS instead. I went for it and it did not disappoint. The RS is a bit better than the PP3 on the track (no surprise there). It lasted for just about the same mileage (7k kms). Seeing the thread pattern of the RS I was a bit afraid of its wet performance but it is surprisingly good in the wet.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I put a set on yesterday, spent a few hours and about 100 miles in the mountains today...They are marvelous. Soft and forgiving. Turn-in was smooth and comfortable. They hold lines like a full track tire. I can't speak to longevity but so far so good.
 

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I did a search but it seems like everyone on the forum is running PR5. I'm curious about the Power RS and the MTS1200. Any opinions?

I've run Scorpion Trial, Angel GT and PR3, PR4 and PR5. I've never made it through a set of those models without severe cupping that required replacement before the tread wore down. I'm looking at tires with a less aggressive tread pattern to try to avoid this.
I have used the Power RS on my 13 multi and I have used all the tires you have tried. The RS transforms the bike. The cornering grip is far better than all the other tires I've tried. It makes the multi feel 50 lbs lighter in corners and transitions. Wet grip is much better than I thought it would be but not quite the wet grip of the PR5. Only downside is the rear tire down to wear bars in 3k miles and 1 tank later down to cords. The front tire lasted 8k miles and not quite to wear bars. I am now trying RS front and PR5 rear. The PR5 does not have near the traction of the RS but 3k miles on a rear as much as I loved the handling and grip does not work for touring.
 

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I am now trying RS front and PR5 rear. The PR5 does not have near the traction of the RS but 3k miles on a rear as much as I loved the handling and grip does not work for touring.
I'm putting on a PR5 on the rear of my Multi now, but still have many miles left on the front Scorpion Trail 2. I admit that I haven't been entirely confident in the grip of that front tire even when it was new. I look forward to hearing your thoughts on the grip and confidence for that RS front paired with the PR5 rear. I have assumed that I'd be buying a PR5 front, but maybe the RS is a better option for the more aggressive sport riding that I do.
 

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I'm putting on a PR5 on the rear of my Multi now, but still have many miles left on the front Scorpion Trail 2. I admit that I haven't been entirely confident in the grip of that front tire even when it was new. I look forward to hearing your thoughts on the grip and confidence for that RS front paired with the PR5 rear. I have assumed that I'd be buying a PR5 front, but maybe the RS is a better option for the more aggressive sport riding that I do.
I like my RS front tire a lot. For me there is considerably more grip than the Scorpion Trail (1), Michelin Power 3, Angel GT, and Michelin Road 3+4. I find the front RS to be as durable as the others and I have more confidence in the tire even with 8k miles on it than I had with other tires when they were new. Some of the other tires might be better for rain but the RS does OK in the wet. I would rather have great traction in the dry where I do most of my riding than great traction in the wet and average traction in the dry.
 

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No experience with the PRs - sorry.

However, with your experience with cupping I wonder if there is something else going on? Front, rear alignment maybe? Loose steering head or swingarm bearings?

In 45 years of constant riding I've only experienced cupping as a result of some mechanical or maintenance problem. A couple of years ago I had cupping on the (dealer installed) front tire of my 2010 Multi. When I went to install a new tire I discovered that the axle pinch bolts were just snug and not tight. New tire (with properly torqued pinch bolts) performed as you would expect.

Not questioning your maintenance routine, just a thought of some things you might want to double check.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
No experience with the PRs - sorry.

However, with your experience with cupping I wonder if there is something else going on? Front, rear alignment maybe? Loose steering head or swingarm bearings?

Not questioning your maintenance routine, just a thought of some things you might want to double check.
this has been a constant across multiple bikes. If memory serves, PR3s on my triumph explorer were the worst. Replaced by Angel GTs which were/are OK but not great.

Scorpion Trails I just took off the MTS were bad and pretty well cupped. Aside from performance, I chose the Power RS because they don't have any deep treads or water grooves.
 

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I love the power RS!!! I'm not on a multi...monster 821...but the tire does need some watching over in regards to the psi. I ask a lot of it and it delivers but if the pressure is off it goes to $#!+ quick...more so as it wears...I'm just at the wear bars now and I'm 2-4 psi over what I started with ...any less and I'll see it cupping...I might not notice the loss in traction but I'll see the loss in rubber...maybe it's just confidence to push harder as I'm more comfortable with the tire...or maybe the carcass needs more support...either way change is needed...the power RS is a thinking man's tire; to get the most out of it you need to watch the wear and adjust the psi...

when it gets wet...don't get into the second compound...I found no grip on its edge in the rain...been pestering Metzeler when the 60 series m9 will be available for the rainy days...can't wait!
 

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Ito get the most out of it you need to watch the wear and adjust the psi...
This is the #1 advice from every tire tech to any tire buyer no matter the brand or type. Running tires a few PSI lower than recommended ads a bit of cushion but shortens tire life and affects wear.

Burned through my first set of PR5 in 16 months and 6K miles. Had a suspension service done and replaced. Will report back on longevity at some point in the future, but the performance is excellent overall. The high volume tire-only shop I use said they don't like hot weather and hard riding. Can confirm from here in Socal.
 

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This is the #1 advice from every tire tech to any tire buyer no matter the brand or type. Running tires a few PSI lower than recommended ads a bit of cushion but shortens tire life and affects wear.

Burned through my first set of PR5 in 16 months and 6K miles. Had a suspension service done and replaced. Will report back on longevity at some point in the future, but the performance is excellent overall. The high volume tire-only shop I use said they don't like hot weather and hard riding. Can confirm from here in Socal.
For the uninitiated....this is an easy way to see if your pressure is off....if both edges of the tread pattern are rolled over...that's the tire collapsing...needs more psi...if only one is... that's suspension related...if none are and it's a crisp edge your likely a bit to high...this is a general guide...the faster you go the more complex the solution


 

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Discussion Starter #16
I've had the RS on a 2016 MTS for a while now. They are fantastic on all manner of pavement and all manner of riding. I rode in moderate rain a couple times and they are adequate...not great. Definitely more slippery than a PR5 or Angel GT but not terrible. They continue to receive my strong recommendation
 

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fwiw I do a lot of long distance riding and have found that some road surfaces seem to cause more cupping than others. I have no scientific data to prove this but I ran PR4s for years, I’m particular about tire pressure, bike loaded the same, and I’d cup 1 front tire in half the distance of the next. It got so I knew certain sections of highway were harder on my front tire than others. I know it sounds crazy just an observation over a lot of miles.
 

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It is good to pay attention to pressure that helps a ton.
But just to be clear pressures that a certain tire needs can be different to another. say if you run a Michelin model x and switch to a Dunlop model Y they may need different pressures due to construction. Even in a given brand you may find different pressures needed if you are running a different type (sport vs sport touring) and then there are GT (, grand touring, or giant turd?) models in many sport touring lines to handle the extra weight and loading of heavy bikes (what ever weight that is).

Problem is due to legal departments no one will tell you what these new pressures are/should be . If you look at most stickers on bikes or owners manuals for tire pressure you will notice they specify not only the size but make and model. This is due to the difference between tires and should only be considered a starting guideline, not a proper pressure for a different brand or model. Good luck if you call a manufacturer and try and get a recommendation as they will not want to guess what it should be either.

Look at the weight of the bike first and then start at the upper end for durability (less cupping and more weight capacity) but know it will be slower to warm up and get sticky. You also can take it too far and shrink your contact patch causing more targeted wear as it is a more focused wear band. Low pressures do cause the tire to warm up faster and give a larger contact patch but at a cost of added wear and if you go too low you can overload the carcass causing a number of other issues (rim damage, un-even wear).

Any time I install a new tire (brand/model) on my bike I consider the first 500 miles all experiment to find what pressure the new tires want. I do often START with pressures from the bike manufacture.
 
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