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Discussion Starter #1
For bolts that cost $9 apiece it seems they're stupidly easy to strip (allen pattern not threads). I use anti-sieze... I torque to spec and no more, and still after a couple of cycles they visibly start to round off and if I don't replace them I end up stripping one. I've replaced my allen keys and sockets (socket for torquing) and still they strip. I even tried looking for a english socket that was maybe a tiny bit tighter in the bolt head... but no luck.

I looked for comparable shoulder bolts... fastenal has bolts same length but not shoulder (threaded the whole way which may or may not be a problem... I'd rather have proper shoulder bolts). Anyone use Ti bolts and how did that work out (and where did you get them)
 

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Have you tried McMaster -Carr?

 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm using oem... which look like stainless or similar (no rust, not that hard). I think traditional hardened steel would be risky because rust in the pinch might cause a lot of problems on removal. Ti seems like a decent option but other than ebay "who know's if they're any good" bolts I'm not finding them - maybe I should look for Pani Ti kits (I imagine the bolts are the same).
 

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Thats a drag - I feel your pain. Not on my Multi, but on one side of my ST2 triple the pinch bolt hex/allen head stripped years ago. After several attempted solutions I ended up literally cutting off the triple clamp and replacing it with a used one from eBay..... Better bolts sounds like a preventative solution.
 

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Maybe give Pro Bolt a try. I've seen several positive reviews. No experience myself though.
 

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Maybe it’s just me, but I only own snap on Allen wrenches. It seems as though cheaper tools do not fit as well.
That's a simple placebo effect. Snap On makes good stuff, I used their tools professionally for decades. They are not however, the end all, be all of tools. I hate their screwdrivers for example.

What I have in my home tool box are Wiha screw drivers and allen wrenches (made in Germany) and a set of allen/torx/spline sockets from a company in the UK. Halfords I think. I got them nearly 30 years ago.

All of them work easily as well or better than any Snap On tools of the same type I used on the job.
 

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I looked for comparable shoulder bolts... fastenal has bolts same length but not shoulder (threaded the whole way which may or may not be a problem... I'd rather have proper shoulder bolts). Anyone use Ti bolts and how did that work out (and where did you get them)
I've used Ti bolts in various applications and they are far more hardened than the OEM stuff. I use quite a lot of stainless too. It can be had in various hardness ratings. Go with a good one and you won't have issues like with the OEM stuff. Also, if you are using anti-seize make sure you are using the correct product for the application.



On most applications, anything harder (more brittle) than a grade 5 bolt (metric 8.8) is not needed. Grade 8 (metric 10.9) would be as high a hardness scale bolt as I'd go. Theory being, the grade 8 will snap where the grade 5 will merely bend.

The only time I've gone with a more hardened bolt was for the flywheel to sprag bolts on my Aprilia. The OEMs were distorted when I inspected them before removal. Removal only confirmed that the threads were damaged.

From the factory, those were metric 8.8. I replaced them with metric 12.9 non cad plated bolts. On any kind of pinch bolt, I'd refrain from using the harder grade bolts. Simply because, the pinch joint will fail well before the bolt will.

It's a whole lot cheaper, and easier to replace a stainless or OEM fastener every few years than it is to replace a fork bottom or a triple clamp.
 

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For fasteners like these (known to strip out easily), I've had really good luck with this stuff:


Mircoparticles of ceramic in an aqueous base that fills the void between your tool and the fastener. Really works! Shop around...you can get a better price than Amazon.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
How often are you pulling the forks?
Have to change tires regularly... depending on what tires I buy 1-3 times a season. Pilot road 4's would last an entire season, Scorpion Trails and Angel GT's would only last 4000 miles or so so 3 times a season.

Also switched to the road 5's ~2 years ago and while they perform a lot better than the 4's... they don't seem to be lasting as long (just mounted my third set).

I think I'm going to go with commodity bolts... these oem parts are nothing special (except the cost). I expect I can find similar performance for under a buck a part and just buy a box of them... throw them out after every use.

Edit - Fastenal M6-30 A4-70 (8.8) Stainless are 55 cents each... so a box of 48 is $26, I can throw them out after each use and still have 5 or 6 years worth... shipped and after tax still less than one set of OEM parts before tax and shipping.
 

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your melted butter bolts reminds me of a hilarious post much about the same subject. Check out TimOz and Kels post about fasteners...

 
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Damn it, can’t edit...TimOz and kgesq posts
 

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Discussion Starter #16
your melted butter bolts reminds me of a hilarious post much about the same subject. Check out TimOz and Kels post about fasteners...

I agree... especially about all the connectors holding various body panels on, why they had to have 2 or 3 different types (some of them are the exact same threads but different diameter head... SLIGHTLY different diameter) I honestly think is just malicious intent on the part of some little Italian Mechanical Engineer. I've swapped them and didn't notice until I took them off later... all that just for the plastic bits... I can't understand.

The 'enduro' skidplate is a particularly heinous fastener monstrosity... I ended up MacGyver'ing most of its fasteners because they didn't loctite them on when they installed the skidplate and the bike hucked them off in the first 3 miles (it's a Ducati... loctite or antisieze on every fastener that comes within 6 feet of the bike).
 

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I don't have any issues getting bodywork off of the Multi, at least the fasteners are all screws/bolts instead of the horrid plastic push-center fasteners that are so popular on some japanese bikes (my R1 was riddled with them)
 

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...and a set of allen/torx/spline sockets from a company in the UK. Halfords I think. I got them nearly 30 years ago.
Halfords was always sketchy mate, so its likely not where you bought them but when you bought them... ;)
 

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Halfords was always sketchy mate, so its likely not where you bought them but when you bought them... ;)
I have idea where they were purchased. I worked at the vehicle maintenance shop on RAF Upper Heyford. Our parts guy picked them up for me at the cost of a case of Michelobe.

I’ve had them since 1993 or so and never had a single issue with them. I’ve used them in my garage ever since and used them professionally as well.

Never had a bit nor a socket fail. Seldom have I ever stripped out a hex, torx or spline fastener. Usually only happens when the fastener is made of cheese, or butter colored to look like alloy.
 

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I've found this to be a problem across multiple Ducatis. The alloy they use on their hex head bolts is very soft. Two things I did that seem to have helped, are switching to only using high quality tools, I've basically standardized on Bondhus, probably not the absolute best you can buy but they've served me well, and I prefer using round head T-handle wrenches where possible because they give me a better feel for the torque I'm applying, and less chance of marring the bolt. The other thing is realizing that hex wrenches are basically a wearing tool, much more than an end wrench or a socket. The things wear out with enough use, so I've learned to pay attention if I feel excess slop in a bolt, it may not be the bolt causing the issue.

If I had to guess, Ducati is using this soft alloy for their bolts to avoid mechanics stripping out the connecting part. Or maybe they're just cheap.

edit

Just to clarify, there are specific bolt types on Ducatis that seem to be bad about stripping the head. The black, external bodywork bolts I've never had trouble with. It's the silvery, aluminum-feeling mechanical part bolts, like those used to clamp the axle into the forks, or attach the gas tank to the frame, that strip if you look at them funny.
 
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