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Was just wondering...since don't need to worry about clutch lubrication, why pay more for a motorcycle specific oil ? Been using Mobil 1 with great success in both my Viper and Porsche. It's a superior oil.

Your opinions, please.
 

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Was just wondering...since don't need to worry about clutch lubrication, why pay more for a motorcycle specific oil ? Been using Mobil 1 with great success in both my Viper and Porsche. It's a superior oil.
I'm no oil expert but cars don't run engine oil in their trannys like bikes do, so the shear forces are less demanding in cars. Or something like that.

In any case, for how often you change oil in the bike is it really worth fretting over the $20 or whatever the difference is?
 

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+1 On what DesmoDog said.

A bikes gearbox is a pretty nasty place for oil that hasn't been designed to withstand the environment. The gears can chop the chains of molecules fairly quickly, which is why cars have a different oil in their gearbox/transmission. Bikes being so much more compact generally don't have the space for 2 sumps so have to have oil formulated to survive the hostile environment. Car engine oil isn't designed to...

However using a car oil shouldn't present a problem if you change your oil very frequently, but seeing as Mobil 1 isn't a cheap oil by any stretch of the imagination, I can't see any cost advantage, TBH
 

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Don't do it; there's a reason why the motorcycle specific oils cost more and it's not just because of the economy of scale (larger car market). The additives are quite different. Mobil1 makes good motorcycle specific oil also. You would be better off with that. Don't be penny-wise and pound-foolish. Best thing to make your engine/tranny last long - pick a good motorcycle oil and stick with it. Your engine will "set" to the particular brand of additives.
 

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Mobil 1 15W-50 Automobile Oil in a Ducati

I use Mobil 1 15W50 car oil in my 916. (I assume that's what you meant, there's no Mobil 1 5W50 weight oil.)

OK, I realize that the choice of motor oil invites all kinds of heated discussions, but here goes anyway ...

Ever since Mobil 1 synthetic oil was introduced, I've used it in all my vehicles, and changed it at 3,000 mile intervals or less. For awhile now, I've been reading cautionary comments on the web about using automobile-specific Mobil 1 in motorcycles instead of motorcycle-specific motor oils. I can certainly afford the more expensive product but I was skeptical that it really was a better product. So I looked into it a little and this is what I came up with ...


http://www.ducati.ms/forums/showthread.php?p=706489#post706489
 

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i use mobil 15-50 in my 999. I change it every 2500 km's. Cheaper than amsoil here.
 

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Thank you, Shazaam.

IMO, "Motorcycle Specific" Oil is simply a marketer's way of getting more money out of naive consumers.

Modern oils are almost uniformly excellent. "Additive packages" are largely marketing hype. You may disagree, but I've NEVER seen any hard science or statistics to back up claims that Motorcycle Specific oil protects better than car oil, or that car oil isn't effective in a motorcycle.

If it makes you feel better buy it. Nothing wrong with that. Just don't expect to see any benefits except the purely psychological.
 

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Only type of "automotive" oil I would/have used on my Ducs is Diesel synthetic motor oil. What you're after is the detergents that protect the motor oil from quick breakdown. Diesel synthetic motor oil is a very good option for motorcycles, I currently use Rotella syntethic diesel engine motor oil.

+1 on what Rob998 posted regarding shared oil between gearbox and motor. You can damage the gearbox sooner by using non-detergent based motor oil.

Here's a quote I took from George Morrison, a lubricant engineer with 25+ years of experience in the field. RIP George, he made a great contribution to a thread regarding motor oil. Here's the link, be warned the thread is a long one.

http://www.ducatimonster.org/forums/tech/122020-motor-oil-4.html

Excellent question..... Re: "how long can we now go with these super base stocks and additive packages?" As our discussion has evolved, we have shear resistant base stocks, high performance additive packages, oxidative resistant lubricants but the oils are still subject to contamination from the power cycle and gear box wear. You have heard for years about doubling, tripling ODI's with synthetic oils vs. a mineral based engine oil in autos. The most significant need for changing oils IS contamination. Synthetic lubricants have the capabilities to last *much* longer than a mineral based oil but are still subject to the same contamination issues that confront mineral based oils. However, one of the prime sources of contamination is blow-by. Even in a very new, tight engine we will get some level of blow-by occuring; exhaust by-product gasses are going to get into the engine oil. Exhaust gasses will bring all manner of contaminates ranging from acids, soot, water, and even raw gasoline. With a full Group IV or V synthetic base stock, we do have significantly lower levels of combustion by-product contamination. Piston rings require an oil film for their sealing action. At & near top dead center the cylinder walls are at constant elevated temperatures. Mineral based oils continually burn off, leaving the top 1/4 to 1/2 inch of cylinder wall essentially dry, with no oil film. If you have ever overhauled a gasoline engine with many miles on it you can many times actually see this area of high wear. Correspondingly, with no oil film, blow-by occurs until the rings encounter the oil film on their trip down the cylinder wall. With the oil film, sealing then occurs. Synthetic base stocks will live at higher temps and provide an oil film nearly to TDC, thus providing an oil film for the rings to seal. Thus when ignition occurs, the rings have an oil film, seal, and very little blow-by occurs. Additionally, this is where the measurable power increase at the rear wheel occurs with synthetic engine oils. One can actually *feel* the difference in performance with the right hand! We are now deriving all of the power from combustion. And our engine oil is staying much cleaner as blow-by is greatly reduced, easily enabling doubling, and even longer ODI's on automotive/truck applications.
That said, unfortunately we have a gearbox to contend with and some Ducati have wet clutches. Both of these components add a large amount contaminants to our oil, which will create wear. Especially the gearbox as the steel wear metals will be a super abrasive for any yellow metal in our engines.. Sooo, bottom line. Yes, we could theoretically significantly extend our ODI's with the oil's capaibilities but are very much limited with the high level of contaminants the oil gets from the gearbox and clutch (if wet). So regular ODI's are in order. Hey, it's only 3 or 4 quarts.. :)

A method to *know* what is taking place in an engine is to run an engine oil analysis to determine contaminant levels. Oil analysis is the method we use for cars, trucks and off highway equipment to determine optimum ODI intervals. In some cases we have over the road trucks going 100,000 miles between changes (filter at 50,000), with oil analysis being the driver. Then one *knows* exactly what is going on in the engine. Oil analysis kits are relatively inexpensive ($15 or so) and invaluable in determining engine status. Like taking a walk inside your engine.

George Morrison, STLE CLS
 

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It’s not really true that cars don’t run regular engine oil in the transmissions (in fact now use Automatic Trans Fluid in manual trans in some cases) - being a separate unit from the engine. In the 80’s Honda used something like 30W engine oil in their trans. Given all the “Shear” properties of the gears and why 90W Gear Oil was always used how did they get away with this? Don‘t know!!…. One reason it was used is to help ease shifting efforts, not having to overcome the thicker fluid -- especially when cold -- 90W doesn’t pour well. Also there would be less friction which would increase mileage figures. I never investigated their reasons other then the obvious logical ones (to me anyway), but don’t see how they got away with it given the reasons for other heavier fluids of the past supposedly needed to combat shear - but motorcycles have been doing it for years…. I think the shear is lower with Straight cut (loud) gears used in motorcycles as compared to Helical cut gears used in cars that are stronger and quieter. I’m sure someone will step in and correct me…:D

One thing to consider is the acids left from combustion wasn’t a concern - less break down of additives, gear specific or not. .. So with a motorcycles sharing the gearbox, the oil is doing double duty -- so one would logically think it would break down faster. Do the additives used in motorcycle specific work or just hype? I don’t know -- but logic says it does -- why would manufactures go to such efforts to come up with it in the first place - just to get in your pocket? I suppose it could be the ONLY reason .. But I doubt it. The increased wear by NOT using it as compared to less wear WHEN using it would be hard for any of us “Users” to determine and then becomes a guessing game unless you do all the years of testing in a VERY controlled environment - not just “I used synthetic and my engine blew up -- that never happened when I just used regular straight weight car oil”. Hardly any real evidence but I think most of us go with that type of “Real World” (ours) testing. It could be many things that caused the problem. During service is where MOST dirt is introduced into the engine -- so depending on how careful you are during regular service intervals can make a big difference.

I always used Castrol 20W-50 car oil in my Honda 750F - (there was no such thing as synthetic oil - especially motorcycle specific oil back then - or I couldn’t afford it) NEVER going over 1200 miles between changes and usually much sooner - religiously…. . It developed an oil leak I could no longer ignore.. Once opened up it revealed the Cam and Rockers were junk @ 33,000 miles.. Was this due to using Non-Specific motorcycle oil or because I didn’t use what the book called for - 10W-40 ( finding out later less friction with 10W-40 also running cooler - from a study/test I read) thinking I screwed up -- I have no idea (actually many ideas but….) -- could just be low grade materials from the 70’s… although flaking rockers and other problems seen could be manufacturing problems between processes of many many years and batches of materials….!!

I now use Amsoil 20W-50 motorcycle specific oil -- Waste of money?? Maybe - Maybe not!! Didn’t help prevent flaking rockers ..and I doubt any oil would have….!!
 

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I hate to agree with the fact that Mobile 1 (racing) is one of the best oils, but it really is. http://www.amsoil.com/lit/G-2156.pdf

I use the Motul 300V 10W40 and have been in all of my bikes. The Motul offers a great deal of additives designed to help keep it stuck to the metal when the motor isn't on (http://www.motul.co.jp/eg/fact_sheets/estel_oil.html) and that helps with rocker life during initial startup. I'm pretty sure most super high-end oils use the same additives, they just don't market it as aggressively as Motul does.

I think going anything over 10W40 (IE:15W50 or 20W50) just adds too many additives that you don't really need. You'd be shocked at how the viscosity of 20W50 oil changes over the temperature range.



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Correct me if I am wrong here, but isn't there a lot of performance car engines with gear driven components, cams ect??? If so then what is the difference in using a high performance car oil like Mobil in your bike?
 

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Motorcycle Oil like Mobil 1 V-TWIN 20-50 is like less than $8/Qt. I got a 6Pack for $50
Haven't done crazy research on oil but for now I'd put 'motorcycle' oil in my motorcyle.
I don't even put car oil in my GSX-R. Goodluck though and let us know how it goes. I'm sure it'll be ok, but goodluck.
 

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I've never had an oil related failure on any bike I've ever owned, and there has been a bunch. I've tried the motorcycle specific oils in my bikes, and have now settled on Mobil or Castrol full synthetic car oil in both of my current bikes. The YZ only holds 1 quart so it gets changed more often, but if you change the oil regularly, the price difference can be significant. Especially every month or month and a half.
 

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i use mobil 15-50 in my 999. I change it every 2500 km's. Cheaper than amsoil here.
I have been using it too......a Mobil rep. that was a member at a golf course where I ran the outside services said that "motorcycle specific" oil is BS......and there is no problem using Mobil 15/50 automotive oil in a motorcycle. At the time I owned a Honda CBR1100XX and he a BMW1200. So we got along and the topic came up. Now, since I'veowned my 999 I have used Agip, Golden Spectro and now Mobil 1 15/50. Never has my gearbox shifted so buttery smooth as w/ the Mobil 1. Also I've noticed that the oil stays that "golden" or "honey" color much longer than w' Spectro or Agip. I also hear that ELF is a tremendous oil and very slippery-good for the gearbox.
 

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Yup!

Hello
I work in the refining industry (not Mobil/Exxon) and the Chem Engineers i have talked to about it at work (who are well versed in the petro blending business) say that there is no comparison to the product offered by Mobil 1 with their "Gold Cap" line.
They don't have a lot of background about the motorbike gearbox issue, however, many vehicle manufacturers are installing synthetic engine-weight oil in their differentials these days.
I've used "Gold Cap 15-50" for years in my duc's, and Mobil 1 for decades in my vehicles.
 

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I have a dirty mouth and i would like it washed out with soap.
 

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The newest Mobile 1 car oils are API SM. If you are using API SM oil (of any brand) in your motorcycle, you WILL have wear related damage, irrespective of frequency of oil change. The air-cooled Porsche gurus have spend countless hours dissecting the changes in oil formulation due to stringent emission requirements - bottom line is that SM oils have insufficient anti-wear additives (zinc and phosphorus - ZDDP) for our application. This is the main reason that almost every cycle oil is API SG, as this older spec has higher ZDDP.

Not intending to debate anyone or point fingers, but there is real logic to the API SG vs API SM formulations. If you like metal flaking due to insufficient anti-wear additives, feel free to use SM oils in your Ducati.
 

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All oil breaks down and gets mixed with products of combustion. If your oil is staying clear for a long time, then all that shit is staying in your engine. I use Agip 4T 20 w 50.
 
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