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I'm I ready to purchase my first Ducati as my first motorcycle?


I’m almost done with the MSF course and I don’t have a motorcycle yet but I’m planning to get the Ducati 796 ABS and I had to talk with one of the Instructors that I should work my way up the ladder and develop my skills. Most of people that I know that’s been riding motorcycles said the same thing so it got me thinking.

Should I go ahead and start with a 700cc motor or start with a 250cc-500cc motorcycle?
Is there any good 250cc-500cc motorcycle out there? Preferably new models of naked or sport bikes

I’m also just 18 years old so any tips would be greatly appreciated.

P.S. new to forums, sorry if this is not the right section to ask.
 

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My recommendation is you look for a used bike in good condition. Ride it for a year or more & see if the whole motorcycle thing is really what its cut out to be. Then reassess your position & decide if you want a new bike then or maybe your first Ducati.

The Ninja 250 is a great bike to learn on, but a Monster 620 or Suzuki SV650 would be great too, IMHO.

Best of luck...
 

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I took the MSF course and spent a while riding friends bikes to try them out...

I'd like to think I had a natural progression...

First bike was a Suzuki GS500

Second bike is my M750 carby

Third bike is my M900s I.E.

Next up... 848 or SF848... track time :D
 

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I'm not sure how I feel about this, I think it depends on the level of maturity of the rider in question. I started on a Ninja 250 but probably wouldn't have had too b/c I have self restraint. The biggest issue you face as a new rider is how "quickly" the bike can get you in to trouble. All bikes, even a 250 can get you in to trouble if you are not paying attention, i.e. riding very agressivley, braking too late, leaning too far with cold/worn/aged tires, whatever. The question I think comes into play here is that if you get a bigger faster bike to learn on, the main issue is when you do get a little too over agressive (blasting it for a second) the bike will get you in to trouble faster. So how can you avoid that, by simply not doing it, only you know if you can do that or not. This comes up a lot on another forum I frequent b/c of my car, and people act like you should have to have some kind of training process to drive them b/c of the power/speed, but honestly it just requires not putting your foot on the gas, period and it is as safe as anything else (to an extent). I know there is some argument to be made that a smaller bike is lighter which would be easier to handle for a beginner which I do agree with, but besides that I feel like if you are mature enough to wait and build slowly to using the power (which will be VERY hard) then there is an advantage to not having to buy/sell a number of bikes before getting what you want. I guess the only other thing that could be argued IMO is you will probably drop your first bike, maybe several times just b/c there are things that everyone will do by accident, that is how we learn, so that is another check for a crappier first bike, you won't care as much and it will be a lot cheaper to fix probably than a Duc.
 

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No, you are probably not, *IMO*, at 18 years of age, ready for Ducati ownership. Sure, maybe you can buy one, but you are not ready from an experiential point of view, to truly enjoy a Ducati motorcycle for all if has to offer.

Go buy a shit box Japanese bike that you can drop, and beat up on, and learn to ride without fear of damaging your bike and that will not cost you a lot to maintain. That way you can spend the money on gear and tires instead of maintenance, because unless you do most of it yourself, it will cost plenty for an 18 year old. Once you have a few seasons under your belt, then maybe you might be ready for a better bike, but chances are, a 6-700 cc SS bike from one of the big four will capture your attention for all the practical reasons mentioned above, you will join the throng of Ducati haters because they do not offer the same bang for buck as their Asian counterparts, and you will buy into the stories of their horrible reliability, and so your motorcycling career will go on indefinitley, until one day, you'll wake up and want "something more." You won't know exactly what you're longing for, but you'll know you need a change. *Then*, maybe, you will be ready for a Ducati. :)

You're 18...go chase girls. :)

(Keep in mind, I'm 58, raised 4 children to adult hood, and as such, am a master of reverse psychology. ;) Get what you like and enjoy it. :) )
 

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Obviously, nobody can make your decision for you, but here are some things to consider when shopping for your first bike:

item) You are going to drop it. More than once. If you buy a brand new bike and it ends up with a few scuffs and dings within the first 6 months, are you going to want to cry? If so, then start with a used bike.

item) What's your personality type? Are you a risk-taker? A thrill-seeker? Or do you tend to be methodical and cautious? If you lean towards the former more than the latter, then consider starting with a smaller, less torquey bike. It will be less likely to wheelie accidentally and will keep troublesome events from occurring as quickly. Over time, your throttle hand and braking fingers will become more disciplined and you'll be more well-equipped to handle a bigger, more powerful bike.

item) What's your budget? Will you be stretching to afford the bike? If so, remember that you should also be budgeting for gear... at least 500 bucks or so to get started. Also, will you be able to afford the maintenance?

item) What's your driving record? At age 18, insurance is going to be very expensive once you start looking at bikes over 500cc's. Be sure to get some quotes BEFORE you buy a bike!

item) If you buy a smaller used bike in reasonably good condition, and you keep it in reasonably good condition, you'll likely be able to sell it for roughly what you paid for it. There is ALWAYS demand for quality starter bikes!!

item) If you have no riding experience but you passed the MSF course... congratulations! You now have a set of really great tools for riding around in circles at 20 mph! Those tools will serve you well out on the street, but not until you've practiced them so much that they are second nature. Until you can use the controls without thinking about them, then you'll have at least some of your focus distracted away from your riding environment. A large bike that you are worried about dropping will only extend that time.

Certainly many people have bought large displacement bikes as their first ride and survived just fine. Some of them had riding experience, others were highly disciplined people, and most were just plain lucky. Before committing to that particular course of action, you need to be honest with yourself about what kind of person you are, and make a choice from there.
 

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My advice to newbie riders of any age is always the same: Buy a used UJM (Universal Japanese Motorcycle) and ride it for a year or two to gain experience and to better assess which brand and model best suits your riding style and needs.
 

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My recommendation is you look for a used bike in good condition. Ride it for a year or more & see if the whole motorcycle thing is really what its cut out to be. Then reassess your position & decide if you want a new bike then or maybe your first Ducati.

The Ninja 250 is a great bike to learn on, but a Monster 620 or Suzuki SV650 would be great too, IMHO.

Best of luck...
+1 on this advice from RickTv60. Buy a good used bike that you are not overly concerned about dropping so that you can concentrate on your riding style and skills development. Once you get some experience under your belt you will be better able to select the bike that really fits what you are looking for in a bike, one that speaks to your soul. Good luck and stay safe.
 

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At 18, you're only been on the road two years and don't have much experience driving let alone riding. Even if you had experience, 18 is bit young for a Ducati. Maintenance is pricey and God forbid you go down, its pricey as hell. Even then, think what insurance will cost you. I think your best bet woud be a used 250. Ride the hell out that for a couple years and save up your cash......you are not a jedi yet
 

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I'm I ready to purchase my first Ducati as my first motorcycle?


I’m almost done with the MSF course and I don’t have a motorcycle yet but I’m planning to get the Ducati 796 ABS and I had to talk with one of the Instructors that I should work my way up the ladder and develop my skills. Most of people that I know that’s been riding motorcycles said the same thing so it got me thinking.

Should I go ahead and start with a 700cc motor or start with a 250cc-500cc motorcycle?
Is there any good 250cc-500cc motorcycle out there? Preferably new models of naked or sport bikes

I’m also just 18 years old so any tips would be greatly appreciated.

P.S. new to forums, sorry if this is not the right section to ask.
I agree with everyone else on the less expensive beginner bike, but that being said I think your choice of the Monster 796 abs is a great one. It is easy to handle, comfortable, looks badass and has good power but is a bit more controllable than what most 18 year old riders want.

Good luck in your decision. And thank you for coming in here with some sensible ideas and not wanting to get a Panigale for your first bike. :)
 

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Good luck in your decision. And thank you for coming in here with some sensible ideas and not wanting to get a Panigale for your first bike. :)
+1! Many times over!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
To all that replied!

WOW! My mind is set I shall get a cheap Japanese bike (maybe the Ninja 300) and ride the hell out of it (with self restraint and responsibility of course) for more than 1-2 years and learn the basic maintenance technique on a motorcycle and master it... and maybe by then I deserve to say that I'm ready for a Ducati!


Thanks for all the feedback and tips! I shall return here with my first Ducati bike, the 2014 or 2015 Ducati Monster 796 ABS that I bought from ProItalia with Termi exhaust and mods :D

I'll still be looking around here even though I'll have a Japanese bike! Learning more about the Ducatis and looking at your sweet bikes!
 

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Even the smallest Ducati is a real handful.
I think some off road riding on an enduro is the way to learn.
Consider a scooter too.
Even if you end up with a Ducati, you still will need the scooter for some in town errands.
 

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Even the smallest Ducati is a real handful.
I think some off road riding on an enduro is the way to learn.
Consider a scooter too.
Even if you end up with a Ducati, you still will need the scooter for some in town errands.
I can't think of any reason one would need a scooter. Well, except maybe for racing in the scooter class. Or for when you trailer your superbike all the way to the Dragon but forget our keys. :D

Get the most bike you can afford and live your dream.
 

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I can't think of any reason one would need a scooter. Well, except maybe for racing in the scooter class. Or for when you trailer your superbike all the way to the Dragon but forget our keys. :D

Get the most bike you can afford and live your dream.

Elitist bike snob! :)

Scooters are a heck of a lot of fun and can be ideal choices depending on circumstances.
 

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GREAT advice from everyone...glad you are deciding to chose to get used to riding first with a more affordable moto and honing some skills before moving on to something better :)

You'll appreciate the Ducati much better when you finally get one. I do and no regrets here. :)

Best of Luck to you!
 

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WOW! My mind is set I shall get a cheap Japanese bike (maybe the Ninja 300) and ride the hell out of it (with self restraint and responsibility of course) for more than 1-2 years and learn the basic maintenance technique on a motorcycle and master it... and maybe by then I deserve to say that I'm ready for a Ducati!
My first bike was a brand new Ducati 907ie back in 1991. Everyone told me the same things they're telling you. And I agree with the vast majority of what they are saying. But in the end no one can answer that question for you. You have to decide what it is you really want and accept the baggage that goes with the decision. FWIW I dropped the 907 within 24 hours of buying it. Of course it bummed me out but that was the risk I took so suck it up and fix it. If dropping it would break your heart (or your bank) then it's not the bike for you (first bike or not).

I'm not saying you SHOULD buy the Monster. In fact I'd say you probably shouldn't. But it's not a foregone conclusion it will end in tears like some people say. I still own that 907 by the way, plus a few other bikes. Along with some heartache it also played a role in some pretty cool times in my life. Then again, I was in my 20s and had just gotten my first "real job" when I bought it.

IMHO the big issue people have when buying a Ducati (and not just as a first bike) is unrealistic expectations. The fantasy doesn't match the reality.

If you are going to buy a Ducati, especially as your first bike, you need to go into it with your eyes wide open and be honest with yourself about what it is you want and/or are expecting it to be. While there are people who buy bikes that they don't intend to ride much, most of those low mile, couple year old bikes that are for sale each summer were bought by guys who didn't realize what it was they were actually buying...

But I digress. It sounds like you made the right choice for you. FWIW I think the WeeBR and little Ninjas are pretty dang cool. If I wasn't such a Ducati snob I'd probably be seriously looking at one. (Instead I'm trying to build a Ducati single that can run with them. :p )
 
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