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Discussion Starter #1
I’ve owned my Ducati 996 (Year 2000) for a few months now, but today it was 25C ambient temperature and high humidity. The bike temperature reached 100C after about 2.5 miles. After ten minutes of town riding it was reading almost 120C.

After 30 minutes riding time under these conditions it became difficult to find neutral when stopped at traffic lights resulting in me stalling the bike three times when pulling away.

Is this behaviour normal for this bike and do I just need to learn to live with it or is something wrong like a build up of road soil in the radiators?
 

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Are you putting around through city traffic??

If so, you bought the wrong bike. It likes the speed-and air current through the radiator. Make sure your fan is kicking on when it gets that hot... if its not then you need to troubleshoot it and fix it. My bike floats at around 180-210F (80-100C) in usual suburb traffic. But this occurs after I had been riding for a little while more than 2 miles. Once I crack it open on the highway it drops to as low as 140F (60C)

Check your coolant levels and check for radiator obstructions. If your coolant is low, find out why and where its going. If your radiator is full of junk and bent fins, clean it and get the tool to bend them back. Cracked coolant tank?? Just eyeball it.

If none of this seems to help, you may have a greater problem on your hands.

The difficulty in finding neutral could be air pocket expansion due to heat in the clutch line... guys back me up on this.

Good luck and let us know how it goes.
 

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this seems very hot to me.

The only time I would ever see these kinds of numbers on my bikes is idling in the sun in 100+ temperatures. I think there is a problem, I would first check (when cool ) the coolant level and perhaps if it was recently worked on, there may be air in the system. I know my 996 is a bitch to bleed all the air out of it sometimes.

Good Luck,

mark
 

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Discussion Starter #4
The radiator fins are straight, I placed a light behind them and it demonstrated clearly that it is not full of road soil.

The coolant level is fine. Also I could hear the fan working when I stopped the bike after my journey.

I have concluded that the problem must be in the head of this inexperienced Ducati owner. Thanks for your help.

I’m surprised that these bikes are designed and made in Italy a hot Mediterranean country. However their test plan can not be that extensive as cold weather riding can also produce problems for some Ducati’s as they are used outside their test scope.

I am forming the opinion that owning a Ducati is a little like having a relationship with a supper model. The may look drop dead gorges but they are temperamental and highly strong. I’m in a high maintenance expensive love affair. Bella testarossa (Beautiful red head).
 

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Ive had my 999 for 4 years and they really don't like slow traffic!!!!

Ive had 120+ several times when I have been stuck in traffic it soon returns to normal once you get up to speed -unlike your meat and two veg which are well and truly cooked!
 

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These bikes don't like traffic. Split lanes at the stop light and get ahead of the pack if you gotta (that's what I do at least, although it is not legal).

My 748s rarely runs over 100 celsius, and usually hovers around 80 celsius.

My 1098s runs a bit cooler at 70-80 and rarely gets over 90 unless I'm in traffic, in which case it never goes over 100 celsius.

Considering the fact that you're in England and ambient temps aren't scorching I'd say that 120 is very hot, even for traffic. You need to take a good look at your cooling system IMO.



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Don't know why you guys keep sayiing they're not made for traffic. I have no problems. 220 is the hottest I get in 116 heat index florida.
 

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Had the same worry with my 998, runs about 70 to 80c when on the open roads but drop in to traffic in built up area and goes over 100c. I tested the fans and they come in at 104 and 105 degrees dead on according to an article I read. I reckon they just get hot in traffic and provided the fans come in should be no problem.
Still, not a bike for being stuck in traffic, roasted right leg,clutch aches on left hand but all forgiven when you get going again.
 

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100c at speed seems abit much at 25C ambient.

You might try adding somw Water-Wetter. I did that to my SPS and it actually works really well. I also found that the bike copes better with hot temps when running a 20-50W oil instead of the Ducati recommended 10-40W. I use a local brand, but Shell makes a 15-50W advance afaik.

You might also want to build a "manual on" fan switch. There is a write up for that in the Hall of Wisdom.
http://www.ducati.ms/forums/showthread.php?t=9290

//amullo
 

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On my 1998 ST2, the readout (gauge) temp sender and sender for the ECU were both flakey, AND they were sending signals that were about 25 degrees F LOW. This means the engine was getting 25 F hotter than what I though, or the ECU/fan thought.
I replaced them with Bosch units.

One way I was able to verify is due to the fact that my system wasn't pressurizing any longer (this turned out to be some crud on the rad. cap). But, with 0 psi in the system, I was able to hear it boil when I shut if off at 212F.

A meter with thermocouple or a pyrometer of some sort would be nice to use to verify all of this, but I did not have that. I did however, boil water, immerse the 2 "bad" senders, and the resistance readings were not spot-on, as the Bosch units were.
 

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-- you might also try Engine Ice - a different formulation then basic antifreeze - i have noticed that the temps no longer spike up, and overall with a bike to bike (same bikes) comparison, the Engine Ice was "slightly cooler" running

www.engineice.com
 

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I'm not gay, but you're hot! I was getting 105 in the beginning but when I switched to Nemesis it dropped a lot, never seen 100 and I do a LOT of stop and go. But I've gotten new hosers for the rad and will have Speedymoto pump soon. Next, probly, is a manual switch for the fan.

I think these things are OK to run hot (I say that based solely on observation/reading, not any technical knowledge) but it definitely sucks at the rider!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I started out to work this morning (7 am) after only four miles it was reading 120C. I turned around and went home knowing that this can not be right.

I removed the tank then remove the coolant reservoir cap bone dry! I looked all over the engine for signs of fluid leeks but there was none. Then I empted the cooling system being careful to catch all the fluid (leaning the bike over ect). The result was only 1.1 litres of coolant, there should be 3.5 litres. So there is my problem, I have purchased a badly maintained second hand 996.

I will fill it up tomorrow with pure Ethylglycol, I was told that if you do not dilute it with water this stuff does not brake down.

I may be getting a little paranoid now but I thought this morning I was having to put about 5000rpm on before it would pull away. I could be just looking for problem that are not there. However when I have the bike on the road again I will confirm this. If it is not pulling away below 5000 rpm I will take the clutch cover off and have a look. I changed the whole clutch only 600 miles ago, so I hope it has not been damaged by the heat.

Thank you for you advice, it is appreciated.
 
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