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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone own one of the anodized Alu rear wheel sockets? What is your experience with the Alu version?

I need to get a socket and while steel is obviously better for the purpose IMO, I'd like to carry it with me and for that, the Aluminum would be nice. I searched and couldn't find much on it except one user who buggered up an Alu one with an impact wrench. I'll be doing it by hand and could insist a shop on the road do the same.

Knurled Steel one that looks decent a little less in cost, so no big deal there

Steel link $33 delivered

Alu Link ~$45 delivered
 

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I have both- at one point there was no Duc shop nearby, but there was a good independent place that did tires well. I bought a steel hub socket which by agreement stayed at the shop for me and other Duc owners. When the shop closed I got it back and used it the same way with another local shop until they got their own. I bought an AL one which stays with the bike for trips and so far (knock wood) is pristine. It's for a tire replacement on the road just in case- most any shop can change a tire, but few have the socket. If its gets buggered but gets me home, I'll be OK with that. The difference in weight is a pound or so at most- if you can only swing one, get the steel and use it for both functions.

Dave
 
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Discussion Starter #3
I have both- at one point there was no Duc shop nearby, but there was a good independent place that did tires well. I bought a steel hub socket which by agreement stayed at the shop for me and other Duc owners. When the shop closed I got it back and used it the same way with another local shop until they got their own. I bought an AL one which stays with the bike for trips and so far (knock wood) is pristine. It's for a tire replacement on the road just in case- most any shop can change a tire, but few have the socket. If its gets buggered but gets me home, I'll be OK with that. The difference in weight is a pound or so at most- if you can only swing one, get the steel and use it for both functions.

Dave
Thanks Dave. On a facebook group the overwhelming recommendation I got was use the steel one. Several reported issues with the Alu, so steel it is.

Meanwhile, noticed your sig. Not to hijack my own thread, is there a thread on your lowering? With a 30" inseam the bikes height is about the only thing I don't like about it.
 

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Aluminum won't hold up to the stupid high torque spec on that nut... might be nice for one to keep on the bike for emergencies.
 

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I wouldn’t use anything that isn’t case hardened steel. Nothing but SpeedyMoto for me.
 

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I broke my Kobalt 1/2" 200 ft/lbs torque wrench and a Craftsman 1/2x2" extension trying to take that nut off. The only way I have been able to remove that nut is with an impact wrench.

BTW: I wrap my steel socket up and carry it under the passenger seat no problem. Like you, I'm worried that I'm on a trip, cut the tire on something in some small town that does not have a Duc dealer.
 

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Steel one for me. It lives under the passenger seat, not in the tool chest, so it's never accidentally left behind.
 

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I broke my Kobalt 1/2" 200 ft/lbs torque wrench and a Craftsman 1/2x2" extension trying to take that nut off. The only way I have been able to remove that nut is with an impact wrench.
This is why you never use a torque wrench to take things off. They aren't designed for that. And most don't correctly measure torque counterclockwise either.
 

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Mine doesn't have the extra socket for the front wheel axle, but it' steel and weight 13 1/4oz, less than a bottle of Pepsi.

.


 
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I have both an Al and a steel one. The Aluminum was getting beat up by the rattle gun and I only used it twice. No issue's w/ the steel one.
 

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This is why you never use a torque wrench to take things off. They aren't designed for that. And most don't correctly measure torque counterclockwise either.
Wasn't using it to measure torque, just needed enough leverage. The torque wrench is 25" long and I don't have a breaker bar or cheater bar for that matter. But yes, lesson learned. Going to find 2' of black pipe to use as cheater bar on my 1/2 ratchet or invest in a big breaker bar. In fact thinking of investing in a torque multiplier from Northertools just to remove the $%&# rear nut. But would need a 3/4" female to 1/2" mail adapter.

https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200623947_200623947

BTW: walked into Lowes with the broken torque wrench and they replaced it
 

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I destroyed an aluminum one with an impact. On my Monster, if I torque it on correctly I can not get it off without an impact. I got a big ass American steel socket.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

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BTW I touque it on as specified and use hi pressure moly grease as the service manual states. Wonder if there is a particular brand or spec for the moly grease. I might try the Honda Moly paste used on the rear wheel splines on many bikes.
 

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BTW I touque it on as specified and use hi pressure moly grease as the service manual states. Wonder if there is a particular brand or spec for the moly grease. I might try the Honda Moly paste used on the rear wheel splines on many bikes.
I think any moly paste will work. Or antiseize paste.
 

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In my case, I've tried copper based anti-seize, Honda moly stuff, and regular old grease. No difference. 175 neutons going on and 400 to get off. I think it's just they way a super fine thread at that torque works. Forget on the road wheel removals. Unless you carry a battery powered impact. :)
 

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Stopped in at Austin Ducati yesterday (happens to be next door to Northerntools where I was buying a 30" 1/2" driver breaker bar) to see the new V4 Penigali. While there I asked one of the techs what they use to get the rear nut off a Multi. They use an impact wrench.
 

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I'm another proponent of the steel ones. I spun an aluminum one on the breaker bar lug.

I know Ducati says to grease the threads, but I found not greasing them was the way to go. The hub gets hot and cooks the grease. Keeping the threads clean meant similar torque to remove as to install.
 
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SpeedyMoto Steel Rear Socket

Received a new steel SpeedyMoto this morning.

Great advice on carrying it under the seat!

Not sure I'll ever use it personally, but if I get caught on the road, someone might find it handy to repair the rear tire.

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #20
HDESA brand steel arrived today. Nice low profile, front and rear, knurled, well made. Was a little less expensive ($33 on eBay). Feels heavier than it is I guess. ~1.5lbs.
 

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