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I went up to the dragon this weekend and my mileage shot up dramatically. I normally am getting mid to low 40's with city/highway riding on my commute. I had to do a lot of interstate to get to the dragon but on my first fill up I got 57!! Is that even possible? Checked it again at my next fill up and it was 53. Does riding at altitude effect this?
 

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I went up to the dragon this weekend and my mileage shot up dramatically. I normally am getting mid to low 40's with city/highway riding on my commute. I had to do a lot of interstate to get to the dragon but on my first fill up I got 57!! Is that even possible? Checked it again at my next fill up and it was 53. Does riding at altitude effect this?

Altitude lowers mpg due to less air.
 

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it really depends.
57 miles. how many gallons of gas did you put in?
53 miles. how many gallons of gas did you put in?
were you riding harder?
were you going uphill a lot?
if you are cruising at a steady pace, your gas mileage will not suffer as much due to less aerodynamic drag.
If you are riding hard, you can expect gas mileage to drop precipituously. Due to less atmospheric air pressure, your motor gets less power per same gas volume at sea level; in turn, if you want to ride hard at a similar pace while at sea level, you'll need to give more gas.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
it really depends.
57 miles. how many gallons of gas did you put in?
53 miles. how many gallons of gas did you put in?
were you riding harder?
were you going uphill a lot?
if you are cruising at a steady pace, your gas mileage will not suffer as much due to less aerodynamic drag.
If you are riding hard, you can expect gas mileage to drop precipituously. Due to less atmospheric air pressure, your motor gets less power per same gas volume at sea level; in turn, if you want to ride hard at a similar pace while at sea level, you'll need to give more gas.
I don't remember how many gallons I put in but I just took the miles traveled and divided it by the gallons....

I was riding relatively hard but nothing crazy...about what I do on my normal commute
 

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I live at 6,000 feet and usually get about 37-42mpg with an empty bike. Bags attached, but empty. On a recent trip to the coast with my bike loaded with about 50 pounds of gear I never dipped below 40mpg even with stints of 100mph plus....

57mpg on a motorcycle? Doesn't sound like any fun to me if you know what I mean..
 

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Not to continue another mileage thread, but I regularly get 47 - 52 mpg no matter how I'm riding. ~700' above sea level (according to the good 'ol GPS).
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I live at 6,000 feet and usually get about 37-42mpg with an empty bike. Bags attached, but empty. On a recent trip to the coast with my bike loaded with about 50 pounds of gear I never dipped below 40mpg even with stints of 100mph plus....

57mpg on a motorcycle? Doesn't sound like any fun to me if you know what I mean..
I know! That was why I was shocked and had to check it a couple of different times....I am not a conservative rider.
 

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Volleyking: What bike? ST2,3,4,4S ?
A buddy bought a used ST4S about 2 years ago, and he is AMAZED at the mileage the thing gets...close to 60mpg on trips--even with a happy wrist! I've seen mine into the mid 50's. Better than my ST2.

BTW, you should make a signature block for yourself, and list you present bike, so we don't have to ask. I list my current, and past rides...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Volleyking: What bike? ST2,3,4,4S ?
A buddy bought a used ST4S about 2 years ago, and he is AMAZED at the mileage the thing gets...close to 60mpg on trips--even with a happy wrist! I've seen mine into the mid 50's. Better than my ST2.

BTW, you should make a signature block for yourself, and list you present bike, so we don't have to ask. I list my current, and past rides...
There done....I think....I'll check this post to see if I did it correctly. But I'm on a 2002 ST4S. I was so taken by how high it was I checked my math several times. That is amazing.....
 

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You can be sure that on those roads that you were driving slower than you normally would. As far as the mileage, it is possible as I used to get mpg like that without trying to hard. I have since added a power commander and had a dyno map done and though the bike runs very well the gas mileage is just not the same.

Jerry
04 ST4s
 

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Higher air temperatures will also give you better mpg, all else being equal.
 

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its true

i live and ride at 8000 ft and i have noticed much better mileage up here in the clouds.the ecu will lean out your mixture at altitude. there may be other factors involved but i have experianced this on all my bikes.i also notice the lowlanders never believe me.:D
 

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Altitude lowers mpg due to less air.
Actually, the effects of altitude on MPG will vary depending upon the tune of the specific bike but, in general, altitude increases MPG, especially at higher speeds, due to less aerodynamic drag caused by the thinner altitude. Also, the engine partially compensates for the thinner air by injecting less fuel and this can also help increase MPG.

For a given riding style, I notice the best milage at higher altitudes.

If your engine is tuned too rich at sea level you may notice a decrease in MPG at altitude, particularly if it's colder in the mountains. As Bill correctly pointed out, hot temps increase MPG.
 

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You can be sure that on those roads that you were driving slower than you normally would. As far as the mileage, it is possible as I used to get mpg like that without trying to hard. I have since added a power commander and had a dyno map done and though the bike runs very well the gas mileage is just not the same.

Jerry
04 ST4s
Thats interesting because mine improved markedly after the PC3 was mapped on a dyno - What numbers did you get ?
 

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Actually, the effects of altitude on MPG will vary depending upon the tune of the specific bike but, in general, altitude increases MPG, especially at higher speeds, due to less aerodynamic drag caused by the thinner altitude. Also, the engine partially compensates for the thinner air by injecting less fuel and this can also help increase MPG.

For a given riding style, I notice the best milage at higher altitudes.

If your engine is tuned too rich at sea level you may notice a decrease in MPG at altitude, particularly if it's colder in the mountains. As Bill correctly pointed out, hot temps increase MPG.

I thought engines make less power at altitude re less oxygen, and less fuel on bikes with self correcting efi. We know carbed bikes will foul their plugs due to richness and get shit for mileage due to low power. I thought less fuel/air/power = less mpg but I do agree that less drag may explain higher MPG at higher speeds all other factors being equal. If a efi bike leans out in high altitude, wouldn't it fatten up with a dense air charge? More air and more fuel + more power and higher MPG, (unless the ratio gets too rich)?

If higher temps create more power, why are there intercoolers on turbo equiped high performance cars? I've always enjoyed riding in cooler temps because the bike always seem to run much better with denser, cooler air: feels like there's more power, but I guess I'm not really going faster though due to increase in drag. :)

I really don't pay much attention to my MPG unless there's a huge change, and I can't say I noticed any huge increases when I was lucky enough to get to some high altitude twisties, in fact, it may have dropped due to the fun I'd have been having with the loud handle. :)
 

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I thought less fuel/air/power = less mpg but I do agree that less drag may explain higher MPG at higher speeds all other factors being equal. If a efi bike leans out in high altitude, wouldn't it fatten up with a dense air charge? More air and more fuel + more power and higher MPG, (unless the ratio gets too rich)?
Less fuel=more mpg, less hp.

If higher temps create more power, why are there intercoolers on turbo equiped high performance cars? I've always enjoyed riding in cooler temps because the bike always seem to run much better with denser, cooler air: feels like there's more power, but I guess I'm not really going faster though due to increase in drag. :)
You are confusing power with efficiency. Cool air means dense air and our ECU's will inject more fuel to keep the mixture stoichiometric. That produces more power but lowers MPG.
 
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