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Discussion Starter #1
Searched around for related topics and found nothing for the MTS.

Although I like the relatively soft set up on the '15 MTS, there's room for improvement. Question is, how to get there? New spring thrown on the existing Sachs/Ohlins? Rebuild the unit itself with new bushings and oil?

One aspect of bike ownership that escapes most riders (including me), is the frequency of shock/fork services. Same applies to cars but different discussion. After many years of dealing with used and near-new bikes, it's obvious this is one of the most overlooked safety concerns, right behind brakes (and the required flushes!). Wilbers says send it back every two years for a freshenup.

Since Ducati throws fairly high-spec kit on the MTS and other expensive models, it's fair to say it's not so much an issue compared to a "parts bin" Jap bike like the inadequately suspended FZ7 and the like. That being said...

Take a look at the Wilbers for Ducati, and weigh in if you or anyone else has used it. One of these shocks transformed my FZ1. Around $550 US, it was the best money spent for those of us that actually commute hard daily. Here's the model they list. It's twice the price, but I imagine a Ducati service gets up halfway there.

https://www.wilbers-shop.de/en/Motorcycle/Ducati/Multistrada-1200-AA/shock-absorber-type-642-Competition.html?cur=3&year=2015

The remote preload adjustment for the MTS is fine and dandy if you need a wide range of adjustment. Most of us dwell in that one space, with the same loads, daily driving.

My bike is approaching 18K miles quickly and I have the fuel issues sorted. The handling has held firm, but will degrade over the next 18K and I want it better, not a gradual degradation. Looking to head that off. Anyone go past OEM/Ohlins to another manufacturer?

Thanks
 

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Have you considered having the OEM units redone by a suspension pro ? Probably no more expensive than replacements but you’ll end up with upgraded units that are taylored to your weight and riding style.
 

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Besides being soft is there anything else you don't like about the oem suspenders? I'm 220lbs without gear and on oem suspension on my 16 I'm easily within good sag numbers (added preload front and rear). I found the front would dive too much but after adding preload to get proper sag I find at speed the fork dives just enough to set the front end trail braking and never find the rear squishy or out of sorts. Bike turns in, holds a line, and exits cleanly with excellent road feedback and I find the ride excellent.
Unless you don't like the valving I'd just swap in springs that suit you when refreshing the suspension.

If I was going to do a lot of trackdays I'd consider different suspension but speaking as someone who has lots of track experience and built track bikes with high-spec suspension I honestly feel the oem skyhook works excellent on the road no matter the riders capabilities (when set up correctly of course).
 

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I can pretty much guarantee those shocks will be a problem mounted on the S (where the ecu expects a semi-active rear)... codes and misery trying to figure out how to stop them.

If you're 100% sportmode and never ride any other way (touring) then the Sach's is likely not adding much (and the non-s version of the bike is hopefully the one you bought). If you like riding hard but also need to tour then IMO semi-active is well worth it (I'd never want to switch to a fixed setup personally).

IMO what the DVT multi's really need are more progressive spring options... we can get fixed rate aftermarket springs but then you're sacrificing touring chops on the altar of performance (assuming that 95% of riders don't go through a manual adjustment every time their riding circumstances change) - I would like maybe 15-20% higher rates but maintaining the same progressive ratio. Nobody out there doing that the last time I checked (last year).
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I can pretty much guarantee those shocks will be a problem mounted on the S (where the ecu expects a semi-active rear)... codes and misery trying to figure out how to stop them.

If you're 100% sportmode and never ride any other way (touring) then the Sach's is likely not adding much (and the non-s version of the bike is hopefully the one you bought). If you like riding hard but also need to tour then IMO semi-active is well worth it (I'd never want to switch to a fixed setup personally).

IMO what the DVT multi's really need are more progressive spring options... we can get fixed rate aftermarket springs but then you're sacrificing touring chops on the altar of performance (assuming that 95% of riders don't go through a manual adjustment every time their riding circumstances change) - I would like maybe 15-20% higher rates but maintaining the same progressive ratio. Nobody out there doing that the last time I checked (last year).
These are all good points but coming up on a year and haven't taken it out of touring mode. I guess I need to evaluate again after the full service. Fork oil/seals will be changed and the local dealer does full shock service. The owner said 30-40K is more typical for rear refresh. Buuut, Wilbers uses the same high-spec innards and suggests a freshen up after two years of use. Something about a trade-off between smooth operation and longevity.

Maybe a better question is how many here have had their shock serviced and at what mileage? Cost? The MTS has been around a few years with that same shock I imagine. I also imagine that all the low mile machines on CL aren't anywhere near needing it, but members here are getting way down the road.
 

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Ohlins Recommended TTX Shock Service Intervals
Racing: Every 10 hours of operation. Maximum 20 hours of operation without service and oil change.
Regular street use: Every 30 000 km
https://www.ohlins.com/app/uploads/world/2017/11/OM_07242-07.pdf

Ohlins Recommended Fork inspection Intervals
Normal use: Once a year or every 5000 km
Race track: Every ten hours

Ohlins Recommended Fork service Intervals
Once every 2nd year (or 20 000 km), general: Change front fork oil
https://www.ohlins.eu/download/db/Ohlins_DTC_owners-manual-universal-upside-down--00001573.pdf


Rule of thumb: Suspension should be serviced every 2 years or 24,000 kms.
Most stock suspensions needs a first service after 10k to 15k kms. Stock oil (except Ohlins) is low quality and breaks down quickly.
 

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Maybe a better question is how many here have had their shock serviced and at what mileage? Cost? The MTS has been around a few years with that same shock I imagine. I also imagine that all the low mile machines on CL aren't anywhere near needing it, but members here are getting way down the road.
I had fork service done along with both Desmo services (at 30 and 60 kkm)... I'm embarrassed to say I never asked if they serviced the shock along with the forks.
 

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The first thing I did, when I bought my MTS, was respring her. I had it done at the 600 mile service....that was in Sept '12. I also have the suspension serviced every time I do a major service, including fork seal change. Why? Its been my experience that seals last about 25,000 miles and I don't want 'em 'popping' when I'm 2000 miles away from home in BFE.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Rule of thumb: Suspension should be serviced every 2 years or 24,000 kms.
Most stock suspensions needs a first service after 10k to 15k kms. Stock oil (except Ohlins) is low quality and breaks down quickly.
Right, just as Wilbers states in their manual. How many people actually do that? I'll admit I didn't think about it until I crashed my bandit because the rear shock failed and I bottomed out mid turn at 60mph.

I should have known though. My mom sold her old camry to me because it was "worn out." Slapped KYB struts all around and new tires. Picked her and dad up and she was amazed. "It rides like new!"

SO that settles that. I'll be forking over $2K+ for the first service. Desmo/forks/shock. Ouch! But that brings my cost to $14K for a 2015 S so not crying too much. About 1/3 my extra income for tutoring this school year.
 

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These are all good points but coming up on a year and haven't taken it out of touring mode.
Touring mode is a bit different... if you actually tour than the semi-active suspension makes it super easy to adjust for varying load: Weekend ride... rider mode. Weekend trip, rider with luggage... long tour, 2 riders with luggage. IMO the S is worth it for folks who tour. Now if you just leave it in touring mode because you like the softer suspension and throttle response but never do anything but commute or ride alone on the weekend then you're sort of in the same bin as sport only riders. But if your load is frequently varying then the semi-active suspension is really nice.

I switch between touring and sport all the time even when commuting - rough road... touring, section of twisties... sport, rain... touring, high speed blast on smooth highway (within posted speed limits... of course)... sport, stop and go in town... touring. I would like to try the Ohlins semi-active at some point - but I don't see ever having a fixed suspension for a daily rider after living with the S (which may not be Ohlins quality but is very good).
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I hope you're tutoring at California Superbike School.
California Urban High School

Come to think of it I use sport as a default stiff setting for grocery runs. If 22lbs is the recommend limit for that box I'm being bad. Costco run with combined messenger bag packed and box loaded is easily 60lbs, but the trip home is less than 2 miles. The front feels very light.

Need to remind myself to have dealer do engine first and give it a clean bill of health before tearing into the suspension. How about fork oil weights? When I rebuilt the FZ I used a table with actual working viscosity at temp, which varies wildly depending on brand.

A few posters here have derided the OEM fork oil as less than. Is that because it came out ugly, or as a comparison to a more correct weight for the application? Are to OEM springs commonly replaced for 220# riders?
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
softer suspension and throttle response but never do anything but commute or ride alone on the weekend then you're sort of in the same bin as sport only riders. But if your load is frequently varying then the semi-active suspension is really nice.
Throttle response on high here. Makes sense what you are saying. Going to give the service of OEM parts a try. Question: does the touring mode enable linked braking? I've stomped on the rear brake and had pretty good results. Reading the manual it seems a 2015 MS has linked brakes.

The MTS has exceeded all expectations in regards to handling. Ducati should be commended for that piece...
 

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Throttle response on high here. Makes sense what you are saying. Going to give the service of OEM parts a try. Question: does the touring mode enable linked braking? I've stomped on the rear brake and had pretty good results. Reading the manual it seems a 2015 MS has linked brakes.

The MTS has exceeded all expectations in regards to handling. Ducati should be commended for that piece...
Brakes are linked... but if you engage the rear brake first it decouples them IIRC.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
FInally got down to business on the suspension. Dealer #1 said in person (owner), "we do the shock here." Wow, cool, like in-house? "Yes"

Dealer number two with no wait and with which I already have a relationship: "We just send them to Race Tech, can you take it off yourself?" Hmmm. Call service dealer #1, hey you guys do in-house shock freshen up? "No, we send out to Race Tech."

So there we are, shock is coming off to go to RT and just waiting for estimate on turn around time/cost. Kind of a PITA to get that thing out of the MTS though. Good posts here describing the procedure.

My only hitch is no center stand. I saw some owners had a stand lifting off the frame holes down low and towards the back. Any suggestions on how to lift the bike without a center stand while leaving the swingarm free to move appreciated...
 

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There are some expensive lift stands out there that can center lift the Multi... or you could just buy the center stand (that might be the cheapest way to safely go)... there are usually some used one's on ebay.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
There are some expensive lift stands out there that can center lift the Multi... or you could just buy the center stand (that might be the cheapest way to safely go)... there are usually some used one's on ebay.
For $150-200. WTF? I would happily pay a hundred bucks to a member here, plus shipping costs. But that's a tube steel painted black part, not titanium...JFC

I hang my bikes from the rafters with eye bolts and ratchet straps.
I lost my garage space. If I had it again this whole discussion would be moot. Made a WTB post in classifieds. Crossed fingers.

On to the spring. Race Tech sent an estimate for the rebuild, a quite reasonable $400. Sweet. However, they have matched my description of riding needs with a 114NM spring. Too hard. That much I know. 105 would be better based on a few hours of perusing posts here and elsewhere. I'm #220 in gear and 90% solo.

What I didn't request was a front spring match. Not that the front is deficient, only to keep the very comfortable boing boing and 50/50 distribution. Many an awesome suspension has been wrecked by mismatching components. What do you all think? Is there an ultimate suspension thread for MTS? That would be nice.
 
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