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Hello all!

I am seriously considering a move from the 2018 Africa Twin to the 1260 Enduro. I did the 3 day school for the Enduro and I am not worried at all about it's off road capabilities. It's pretty much twice the money, so I'm just... being careful, I guess.
Who all has this bike?

Here are the links to the videos I did about the experience.
Part #1:
Part #2:

Thanks for any input.
 

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I did the DRE in Italy a couple of years ago and again in Utah this year. Pics!

Since you've done it you can see that with the right skill and confidence level the increased size and weight will not be a huge hindrance. Based on this and the fact that for long distances the MTS is less strain to ride, then I think the answer is clear.

In my mind the MTS 1260 is equivalent to the GS and big KTM. Whereas the Africa Twin is a step lower and equivalent to the MTS950, GS850, KTM990, etc. So you're really comparing apples and oranges.
 

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it really depends on your riding style, how much of it will actually be rural adventure riding. you want something reliable the you are out in the middle of nowhere, and the Honda is reliable.
 

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45K happy and reliable km with the Enduro here. If you like off road, think twice. For everything else, the Enduro is a comfortable rocket compared to the Honda.

Vsss


Enviado desde mi iPhone utilizando Tapatalk
 

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My fully honest opinion:

I love my Ducati... and I was duly impressed with the enduro when I rode it. I does many things well and if you're a big guy may be a 'perfect choice' bike. It's "THAT GOOD".

But I'd personally not have it for hard ADV (stuff beyond seasonal/fire roads)... I rode the original Tenere (the XT500) for years offroad and it's 350'ish pounds wet was a huge disadvantage compared to my buddies on dirt bikes. (but it did do it, just like these bikes 'can do it'). For that extra weight I got a big jump in on-road stability and comfort (if you can call it that... it was still basically a big dirt bike), but had to fight in difficult terrain when they breezed through it. Jumping to 550-600lbs though... that's a HUGE increase and the XT would be a featherweight in that company. A sufficiently skilled rider can haul a big bike through rough terrain... but it isn't fun (in fact it takes a lot of the fun right out of the endeavor).

So these bikes will be expensive and difficult to do any serious ADV with... but if you're talking about easy ADV (dirt roads, powerlines, seasonal, etc...) and are shorter than 6'2" or so... then I'd opt for the 1250GS or 1260S over the 'ADV' versions of the bikes. I've likely done 10,000 miles of easy offroad with my Multi and it's actually been... 'good' overall (not great... little front wheel is a big problem when the road gets squishy). The R1250GS would be 'even better' for light offroad but is still too heavy for hard adv (for anyone who's not a serious masochist). That's also making the assumption you've the money to fix them when you break them... because offroad you WILL break them... and are OK with waiting for parts when you inevitably break them... because you WILL wait for parts (I had a bolt chase me halfway around the US... arriving in dealers 2 days after I left the area and needing to be forwarded).

For hard ADV IMO even the Africa Twin is too heavy... but the big 'super adv' bikes are WAYYY too heavy. And if you're not going to do hard offroad... why get the super heavyweight adv bikes?

IMO - they're halo bikes... meant to appeal to Adv fans in the way spinal tap turned the dial to 11... because it's better. The GSA, the Enduro, and the Super Adventure are bikes for folks who like the IDEA of adventure and have plenty of disposable income... but are not going to be too far from a dealer at any point in time... and are probably not going to get into any sort of serious $#1+. Unless (that is) they happen to be Ewan McGregor and have the ability to drag a couple chase trucks along with you (and if you're that person... you suck and I hate you... just like you Ewan McGregor... no it's not jealousy... it's not.. .sniff... jerk)

If you're tall though... they might be the perfect blend of comfort and performance you're looking for. I bet the Enduro for a dude 6'3" is similar to the 1200 for my 5'10"... crazy capable, comfortable, and fun even if you're not dodging trees in the woods.
 

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I have moved from a AT to a 1260 Enduro. Prior to the AT I had a 1200s DVT.

I honestly think the enduro is better value for money, as well as a much better bike to ride.

This was not my first honda, but will be my last. The quality of finish and components used is woeful. I use my bikes in all weathers, and the honda just didn't stand up to that. corrosion in lots of places (all over the engined, frame, under the petrol tank, wheels etc). The Honda i had 2 years previous (nc700) didn't suffer from any of this and was used in the same conditions. This is supposed to be an adventure bike (go anywhere) and I felt like i had to keep it away from moisture of any kind.
The forks were ok in the beginning and then stiction slowly increased overtime until they were very harsh. brakes were poor and the electronics(e.g. traction control) were poorly implemented.

I honestly don't think Honda are what they once were, not in this cost bracket anyway.

One more thing... there is no 'weight difference'. the Enduro isn't heavier. the weight sits a little lower in the AT, but better and lighter components in the Enduro, keep the weight down.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you all for your responses!!!

You are saying what I experienced when riding the Enduro over the three days. We did a two day experience, but I went in a day early. Over the time I spent on the bike, we did pretty intense stuff and the only time I dropped the bike was in the parking before we left doing as tight of circles as I could! I have had a Tiger 800, KTM 990, GS 1200 and GS 800 and now the Honda. I really like the Honda, the way it looks, etc. However, it does not have the tires or wheels for that matter. I like tubeless for off road. So, right there I will be minimum 2k more into the Honda than what I paid. No luggage. It sits higher and the seat isn't wonderful, (so, new seat). At the end of the day, the Ducati is much better outfitted. (I know I am answering my own question.)

I also ride with many of the coaches from Rawhyde. They all ride GS 1200's and use clutches. This bike fits in more with their style for when I do ride with them.

I also do my YouTube channel, often right off my bike where I travel to search out Urban Legends and mysteries. I have used my Indian Loadmaster at times, but when the going gets tough.... I'm out of luck.

Look, I don't plan on doing hard enduro or single track on the bike. (One of these days I'll get the KTM Six Days for that!)

Thanks again for all of your responses.

Rikki




I have moved from a AT to a 1260 Enduro. Prior to the AT I had a 1200s DVT.

I honestly think the enduro is better value for money, as well as a much better bike to ride.

This was not my first honda, but will be my last. The quality of finish and components used is woeful. I use my bikes in all weathers, and the honda just didn't stand up to that. corrosion in lots of places (all over the engined, frame, under the petrol tank, wheels etc). The Honda i had 2 years previous (nc700) didn't suffer from any of this and was used in the same conditions. This is supposed to be an adventure bike (go anywhere) and I felt like i had to keep it away from moisture of any kind.
The forks were ok in the beginning and then stiction slowly increased overtime until they were very harsh. brakes were poor and the electronics(e.g. traction control) were poorly implemented.

I honestly don't think Honda are what they once were, not in this cost bracket anyway.

One more thing... there is no 'weight difference'. the Enduro isn't heavier. the weight sits a little lower in the AT, but better and lighter components in the Enduro, keep the weight down.
 
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