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Discussion Starter #1
Gents,
I'm wondering if removing the front wheel is going to get me into deep doodoo. I know i can avoid some charges at the dealer if I bring in the wheel versus the bike. I just don't want to open up a can of whoopass trying to save $75. I do not have the proscribed torque wrenches that tell you exactly the torque pressure. I do have the workshop manual in pdf for my 2000 ST2. I will also watch as many youtube vids as I can find on removing the front wheels on Ducatis.

The other reason that I'm wanting to avoid riding it over to the dealer is that I have let the tire get down to wire and the dealer is a good 100 away.

Thanks in advance for your thoughts.
Rusty
Corona, CA
 

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Rusty , take the wheel off , get it over to who is putting on new tire , with savings , get yourself a proper torque wrench , prolly time you had one ....
Craig
 

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Hardest part is finding a way to support the front if you don't have stands. Very easy to actually remove the wheel.

Save yourself the pain and just pull the brake pads out of the calipers. Two clips and two pins per side. Couldn't be simpler, and the calipers are much easier to remove. I use a sharpie to mark them on the back side so they go back in the correct spot. Right-inner, right-outer...
 

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Sounds like you need someone close to you to come over with a 3/8" torque wrench, stand and give you a hand the first time. The front wheel and brakes are components you don't want to get wrong.
For 75 dollars you could almost get the tools needed to do the job.
Your only other choice is to trailer your bike or haul it over in a pickup.
Good luck.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

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Hang the front with straps from garage rafter after breaking loose the caliper bolts and axle nut. Try to hook under the top triple tree, 1 strap on both sides of steering yoke.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I will go ahead and purchase a torque wrench and maybe even the stand - although the rafter suspension is genius. Thanks fellas. I'll do all of your suggestions and with a smile born of confidence. The hard way is not asking.
 

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Be sure the rafters can handle the weight! My old garage required temporary vertical supports on either side of the bike up to the rafter.
My new workshop has a reinforced truss/rafter designed just for heavy lifting.
Ride On
Dave
 

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I'm surprised no one has mentioned being careful with that cheesy axle nut.
i suggest springing for one of those trick axle nut sockets and save yourself the headache of a tweaked nut.
 

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Don’t hang your bike by a 2x4 if you have exposed trusses. They are not strong enough.
 

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Another way to get the front end up inexpensively is to get a board wide enough for the centerstand to sit on and long enough to run under the rear tire. Put the bike on the centerstand on top of the board and strap the rear wheel down to the board with a tie down. Front wheel will be high enough off the ground to remove the front wheel.
 

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Do yourself a favour and do the basic maintenance yourself. I got my 900SSie last season and decided to do all the basic maintenance myself like changing oil/filter, brake/clutch fluids, fork oil, belts, new chain/sprockets, spark plugs etc., all the basic stuff before it gets too complicated and involves the engine. The valve clearance check I do not do. That I leave for a dealer.

To do this basic maintenance I have bought two torque wrenches (covering a range from 6-200 Nm), two stands (front/rear) and a variety of grease and loctite, and some tools were my existing toolbox was lacking, primarily sockets in various sizes.

I have the original Ducati workshop manual and a the Haynes manual.

The main benefits from performing these basic tasks yourself is that you know it is done correctly with all due care taken, and all the initial cost on tools, stands etc. is a one off cost.

One of my first DIY tasks was in fact to take off the wheels to get new tires fitted. The pic attached was from this ‘operation’ :)
 

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Here is the method I have used several times without the use of special tools

Loosen the front bolt/nut and remove the mud guard and calipers as previously mentioned. Zip tie the calipers up so they don't hang on the hoses.
Put it on the centre stand with a big bag of sand (or two) on the rear seat/in the top box so the bike sits back on the rear wheel - take the front wheel out.
When re assembling you may have to squeeze the caliper pistons back a bit to get the pads back in.
Care is needed.

All the best.

derky
 

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Before I got stands, I used my kid. Had him sit on the back to lift the front wheel. Once removed I slid the axle back into the forks and let it rest on a jack stand.

Many ways to skin a cat. :wink2:
 
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