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This is a matter of luck... mine are pretty accurate, so it gives me a good guide. But I still check it.
 

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1. You can't count on them being accurate. This isn't important once you recognize what direction they're off, as you can just adjust to whatever their error is. So, do it the hard way, and then look at where that registers on the marks.

BUT

2. They just aren't fine enough anyway. Personally, I adjust for sprocket alignment, and the difference between perfect and a fair ways off just isn't really visible on those markers.
 

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I've got a question on Alignment concerning the front wheel. First off, The bike has fallen over couple of times due to that dang kick stand doesn't allow bike to lean over far enough in my opinion. Then I fell over on the bike at slow speed having to avoid a pedestrian at a right hand corner broke the right mirror. Anyway the steering seems a bit off to me hard to explain. So i'm checking out the bike at home after the fall over. looking for any signs of forks moving in the triple clamps. I'm measuring vertical in the clamps seems right on so forks haven't slipped in the triples. So now I take a good look at my front wheel and notice uneven wear on the tire (putting a center line on the tire, the wear is more on the left side) see photo. I'm thinking maybe the times the bike has fallen over it's knocked it cockeyed. How can I make sure it's A Ok?
 

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I doubt that a low-speed tipover will tweak your frame and mis-align your steering stem. The forks could be a bit out of alignment, here's a discussion on how to correctly align forks: http://www.ducati.ms/forums/80-hall-wisdom/30605-wheel-removal-installation.html

As far as the wear on your tire, with the rounded profile of a motorcycle tire, you'd need to be significantly leaned over to get to the wear area you're showing us. Could be you are more comfortable turning left (Most of us are...) and you ride harder/faster that way, maybe leading to uneven wear?
 

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I wouldn't worry about the front tyre wear, but I would check the wheel alignment with a length of string.
 

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I modify the stop point on the stand so the stand goes past the point where it is perfectly upright. This helps keep the bike from getting knocked off the stand and makes it lean a bit more. Then I modify the foot so it contacts the ground completely. This adds a bit more of angle the bike leans and makes it more stable. Of course if you have the self folding stand and can buy the bolt to eliminate this feature, by all means, do it.
 

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As far as the rear alignment marks, I use them , then I check chain alignment. If chain alignment is good, I go for a ride. I’ve found if I gas it hard on a dirt road and it goes straight I’m in alignment. If the rear end walks one way or the other, the bike is rear steering and out of alignment..
 

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I modify the stop point on the stand so the stand goes past the point where it is perfectly upright. This helps keep the bike from getting knocked off the stand and makes it lean a bit more. Then I modify the foot so it contacts the ground completely. This adds a bit more of angle the bike leans and makes it more stable. Of course if you have the self folding stand and can buy the bolt to eliminate this feature, by all means, do it.
???
All bikes should never rest upright, they always lean at an angle on the side stand, forming a tripod, keeping the bike stable.
I don't understand what you're talking about "...if you have the self folding stand and can buy the bolt to eliminate this feature, by all means, do it."? Actually, since this has nothing to do with wheel alignment and isn't an issue with the Sport Classic...why :confused:
 

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... I’ve found if I gas it hard on a dirt road and it goes straight I’m in alignment. If the rear end walks one way or the other, the bike is rear steering and out of alignment..
LOL, that's funny, you almost had me :laugh:
 

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I've got the cheap Motion Pro tool that bolts onto your chain. It points a rod down the length of the chain towards your front sprocket so you can check alignment. You can try without the tool and correct gross misalignments. Never had any luck with strings and don't recommend that at all. Too many things can go wrong. Here's the procedure:

1. Use a paddock stand if available to lift the rear.
2. Remove the rear bolt of the chain guide and lift up so you can sight down to the front sprocket
3. Mount the Motion Pro tool on chain at top of rear sprocket. I use a much longer rod than originally supplied.
4. Get a flashlight if necessary and start rotating the wheel and sighting down the rod. Take your time and figure out if
you are in good alignment or canting left or right.
5. Adjust chain slack / alignment and make note of how far off the marks are for future adjustments.
 

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I have been riding since the late 1960's so I have adjusted a couple of chains in my life, but I have never been completely confident about the accuracy of the chain alignment on any of my bikes until I bought a ProfiCAT laser tool. It's small, quick and easy to use and very accurate. No guess work or eyeballing the alignment like with the MotionPro tool or struggling with a string or wondering if the swing arm marks are accurate... which they never are. Hold the tool against the rear sprocket and play the laser dot down the chain. If the laser dot hits the same spot on the chain (top center of the outer plate on my S1K chain) at the front and rear sprockets then it's aligned. Done deal. When I bought it I thought it was a bit pricey, but it's a wonderful tool and if mine ever breaks I will buy another immediately.

Profi Laser CAT chain/belt alignment tool
 
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I have been riding since the late 1960's so I have adjusted a couple of chains in my life, but I have never been completely confident about the accuracy of the chain alignment on any of my bikes until I bought a ProfiCAT laser tool. It's small, quick and easy to use and very accurate. No guess work or eyeballing the alignment like with the MotionPro tool or struggling with a string or wondering if the swing arm marks are accurate... which they never are. Hold the tool against the rear sprocket and play the laser dot down the chain. If the laser dot hits the same spot on the chain (top center of the outer plate on my S1K chain) at the front and rear sprockets then it's aligned. Done deal. When I bought it I thought it was a bit pricey, but it's a wonderful tool and if mine ever breaks I will buy another immediately.

Profi Laser CAT chain/belt alignment tool
Agreed. Takes the guess work out of aligning a chain completely. I've personally found that with this tool the swingarm notches are nearly 1/2 a notch off.
 

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Thank You Adidas for the video a lot of great information. Now a question on torques for
Fork Pinch bolts=
Axle Pinch bolts=
Brake Calipers=
Axle Nut=

If anyone can kindly share info, I'd gladly pay tomorrow for a Hamburger today.
 

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If anyone can kindly share info, I'd gladly pay tomorrow for a Hamburger today.
Taken from the Ducati Sport Classic Sport 1000s 2007-2009 Workshop Service Manual

Fork Pinch bolts= Bottom yoke bolt (4) is 20nm
Axle Pinch bolts=Fork bottom end pinch bolt (4) is 20nm
Brake Calipers= Front brake caliper screw is 43nm
Axle Nut= Front wheel nut is 63nm
 

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Ok I've done the Fork re-align like the video but now there is a swishing sound from the front brakes that wasn't there before. So here is another question. Where on the bike can I place a level while upright to make sure bike is perfect vertical, so I can check for vertical level of the front wheel? I have a stand for parking the bike that holds the bike upright while parked in the garage. I may have to do the re-align again, Video makes it look easy but I have carpet in my garage and placed a piece of sheet aluminum under the front tire to help it move but not sure if it was slippery enough to allow movement if any. But Thank You guys for your help.
 
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