Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Is there a tricky way to go about doing this? I need to replace my bent ones from my spill but I'd rather not have to invest in a front stand at this juncture, for this one job...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,177 Posts
no reason to use a front stand at all.
just remove the upper triple and then the clip ons.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
245 Posts
Is there a tricky way to go about doing this? I need to replace my bent ones from my spill but I'd rather not have to invest in a front stand at this juncture, for this one job...
Good luck with the clip ons - hope they work out for you!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Papa's idea also works from an A-frame ladder if you don't have open beams available.
Another brilliant suggestion, since I actually DON'T have any open beams and had resorted to thinking about maybe using a tree branch... :D
 

·
Senior Italophile
Joined
·
867 Posts
no reason to use a front stand at all.
just remove the upper triple and then the clip ons.
+1 why do you need a front stand? you should be able to just pull off the top clamp and slip them off that way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
+1 why do you need a front stand? you should be able to just pull off the top clamp and slip them off that way.
Welllll...I don't have a rear-stand at the moment either and I was thinking it might screw up the alignment of the forks if I pull of the top clamp while the bike's on the side stand? Plus my other main concern was having to deal with some sort of headset adjustment if I pull the top clamp off...is that a legitimate concern?

I was thinking if I could get the front up, then I could just slide the forks down a few inches, pull off the bars, pop the new ones on, and slide back up...but definitely please let me know if there's a better way.
 

·
Senior Italophile
Joined
·
867 Posts
There is more than one way to skin a cat.
You will do much less to the bike if you can get the top clamp off. if you do not unbolt the lower triple and leave the axle attached then you should not have to do much to the alignment. as long as you dont bounce around on the bike at should be fine.
Park the bike against a wall and tie it down from both sides so that it will not rock back and forth. just like tieing it down in the back of a truck then you can work on it all you want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,822 Posts
You do not want to do either Papa's or my idea without a rear stand, or at least an awful lot of careful supporting. Largerthan's tie-down idea can work too. If you just lift the front as we suggested, without something holding the rear, the back of the bike will want to flop over.

There are various ways you could block the rear, but you will need to do something.

And, yes: after pulling the top triple, you don't want to try to bolt up the front end with the bike sitting on the side stand, but you can do it with a friend sitting on the bike and holding it up straight. But, personally, I wouldn't want to pull and replace the top triple without something taking pressure off the front end while the top triple was off. That could simply be a jack under the front of the engine, but then you still need to keep the bike from falling over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,960 Posts
here's a thought

If you dont have a rear stand you may think about using a rod through the hollow rear axle and a couple jack stands to hold the bike level--then you can raise the front by suspending it. A ladder would work. I have used the overhead beam in the garage technique many times on the Paul Smart and on a monster before that. Remember, the bike is only 400lbs so it really isn't a lot of weight to support when you think of it.

Welllll...I don't have a rear-stand at the moment either and I was thinking it might screw up the alignment of the forks if I pull of the top clamp while the bike's on the side stand? Plus my other main concern was having to deal with some sort of headset adjustment if I pull the top clamp off...is that a legitimate concern?

I was thinking if I could get the front up, then I could just slide the forks down a few inches, pull off the bars, pop the new ones on, and slide back up...but definitely please let me know if there's a better way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
I have changed my clip ons 4 times. I've tried using different heights of clip ons, and never once have I used a rear or front stand. Loosen the 3 bolts holding the top triple clamp on, remove the 2 bolts holding the triple clamp to the gauges and the triple clap will come off with some help from a mallet. You won't have to worry about the forks not being aligned because the lower triple clamp will keep them where they should be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I have changed my clip ons 4 times. I've tried using different heights of clip ons, and never once have I used a rear or front stand. Loosen the 3 bolts holding the top triple clamp on, remove the 2 bolts holding the triple clamp to the gauges and the triple clap will come off with some help from a mallet. You won't have to worry about the forks not being aligned because the lower triple clamp will keep them where they should be.
Cool, I might just use this method in combination with spyvito's idea of the jack stands (which I DO have) and rod...

Lots of good ideas guys, thanks a lot!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,822 Posts
Loosen the 3 bolts holding the top triple clamp on, remove the 2 bolts holding the triple clamp to the gauges and the triple clap will come off with some help from a mallet. You won't have to worry about the forks not being aligned because the lower triple clamp will keep them where they should be.
"Fork Alignment" is really "Triple Clamp Alignment" - that is, the alignment of the top triple clamp with the bottom triple clamp. How does the lower clamp hold the alignment all by itself if the alignment we are speaking of is the alignment of the upper clamp with the lower clamp? This is especially difficult to understand while twisting force is being applied to the fork by the weight of the bike while it is resting on the sidestand.

I do not doubt your story: that you have done as you describe and your bike still functioned. That, however, does not answer my question.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,059 Posts
"Fork Alignment" is really "Triple Clamp Alignment" - that is, the alignment of the top triple clamp with the bottom triple clamp. How does the lower clamp hold the alignment all by itself if the alignment we are speaking of is the alignment of the upper clamp with the lower clamp? This is especially difficult to understand while twisting force is being applied to the fork by the weight of the bike while it is resting on the sidestand.

I do not doubt your story: that you have done as you describe and your bike still functioned. That, however, does not answer my question.
While you are right, the geometry is really only stressed to the point of needing the triangulation of the upper clamp while under way. Take a look at he lower clamp and see if you think that, at rest, anything will be stressed enough to actually move. It won't.

By the way, the re-assembly of the triples and forks after steering head bearing service does not include any upper/lower clamp alignment procedure. It's just a step-wise re-assembly.

Execution of the process with the proper upright support it likely a good idea.........
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,625 Posts
you can also reduce the twisting stress on the forks by putting a small block of wood under the side stand so that the bike is closer to level. don't make it dead level or it can tip over, but you can get it pretty close and do the job with a minimum of drama.

i've done it several times myself on three separate bikes (a gt and two s1k's) and never had a problem with alignment or tip-overs.
 

·
Senior Italophile
Joined
·
867 Posts
you can also reduce the twisting stress on the forks by putting a small block of wood under the side stand so that the bike is closer to level. don't make it dead level or it can tip over, but you can get it pretty close and do the job with a minimum of drama.

i've done it several times myself on three separate bikes (a gt and two s1k's) and never had a problem with alignment or tip-overs.
I have also used the block of wood and 1 tiedown this method works great too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
985 Posts
Didn't think I "needed" stands but had no choice but to buy a set from Pit Bull when I replaced the GT's wheels since none could be borrowed locally. Now, I find them useful for all kinds of little jobs. You don't have to think of it as buying a set of stands for just the one job.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top