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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
is it because my bike is new and still in the break-in period that the rear brakes don't do much at all? i'm assuming the 600 mile service will fix this. but stomping on the rear hardly slows the bike down.

i know many don't use rear brakes.. and its probably good that it isn't sensitive.. but my SV650s brakes could lock the rear if i wanted to. even keeping the bike from sliding back while at a red light isn't easy with just the rear on the 999.

almost 300 miles.. been braking easy, yet firmly to seat the pads/rotors.. but now i'm hitting them harder to see and almost nothing..
 

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Nope they are very weak, Work okay to hold it in on a hill waiting for a light but that's about it. I don't use the thing anyway except when I need to slow when I'm rolling in a parking lot over sand or gravel.
 

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Back brakes?:confused: jus' Kidding, I don't use'm. I think their just decoration.:p
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
in the tone of Milhouse from the Simpsons...

'then why do they put rear stainless brakelines.. why do they huh?'

seriously.. there's a rotor bigger than most car's front rotor. a nice fat sticky rear tire. i can't accept its normal that the rear gives almost no bite.

after the bike is broken in, i'm throwing my wife on back.. i'll be counting on the rear brakes even more. i hope mine's not right and will be adjusted at the 600. for now, my right foot will be used for triggering the brake lights.
 

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SpiderSense said:
in the tone of Milhouse from the Simpsons...

'then why do they put rear stainless brakelines.. why do they huh?'

seriously.. there's a rotor bigger than most car's front rotor. a nice fat sticky rear tire. i can't accept its normal that the rear gives almost no bite.

after the bike is broken in, i'm throwing my wife on back.. i'll be counting on the rear brakes even more. i hope mine's not right and will be adjusted at the 600. for now, my right foot will be used for triggering the brake lights.
Sorry, you’re wrong on this. The rear brake is where many new riders get themselves in trouble. They either believe that the front brake is dangerous and will through you over the bars or will simply wash out for no reason. It’s not true, as you brake harder the front brake takes up almost all the stopping power as the weight shifts fwd. Learn to use your front brake. On the track only the very best experienced riders can effectively use the rear. With a passenger, DO NOT depend on the rear brake. I see it all the time, a new rider gets himself in trouble, stomps on the rear, locks it up and ends up sliding down the road on his butt, or lets off at the wrong time and high sides himself to the moon. A friend of mine who races a SV650 found out the folly of the rear this past track day. He tried to use the rear to tighten his line in turn one at VIR north. Next thing he knew he was sliding through the dirt. The front brakes are safe and effective, particularly when you add the weight of a passenger. That is why most superbike riders never touch the thing it’s usually more trouble than it’s worth. The only time using the rear is recommended is when you are on slippery pavement, gravel or sand where using the front could cause it to wash out due to the poor traction.
 

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it's all about threat of lawsuits, according to BMW
the new BMW K1200S and my BMW R1200GS have useless rear brakes as well

i use my rear brakes a lot.... a large percentage of racers do and have for years.

the manufacturers don't want to get sued over folks being too aggressive with their rear brakes... so the NEUTER then. which i think is ridiculous

i guarantee that the 999R bikes winning World Superbike races have rear brakes that work a lot better

if i'm going to spend 33K US on a bike.... i should be able to decide if i want my rear brakes to be more effective
 

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B_Cebrian said:
Sorry, you’re wrong on this. The rear brake is where many new riders get themselves in trouble. They either believe that the front brake is dangerous and will through you over the bars or will simply wash out for no reason. It’s not true, as you brake harder the front brake takes up almost all the stopping power as the weight shifts fwd. Learn to use your front brake. On the track only the very best experienced riders can effectively use the rear. With a passenger, DO NOT depend on the rear brake. I see it all the time, a new rider gets himself in trouble, stomps on the rear, locks it up and ends up sliding down the road on his butt, or lets off at the wrong time and high sides himself to the moon. A friend of mine who races a SV650 found out the folly of the rear this past track day. He tried to use the rear to tighten his line in turn one at VIR north. Next thing he knew he was sliding through the dirt. The front brakes are safe and effective, particularly when you add the weight of a passenger. That is why most superbike riders never touch the thing it’s usually more trouble than it’s worth. The only time using the rear is recommended is when you are on slippery pavement, gravel or sand where using the front could cause it to wash out due to the poor traction.
your point is well-taken, but a bit exaggerated
it's all about feeling
if you spend time understanding the physics of riding and the physical characteristics of the way YOUR bike rides, then you should be able to effectively modulate the rear brake to your advantage on the road and track

though i've ridden 150,000 miles over the years (mostly on the road, obviously), i don't consider myself and expert. but i am certain that using my rear brake while riding makes me a better rider and is something with which i am comfortable

i just expect more from a company like Ducati
as i said above..... if i can afford 33K for a bike (the Xerox 999R) then i should be able to decide, ON MY OWN, if i am able to use that rear brake

IMHO
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
i've read the pros and cons of using the rear brake. i like to use it to settle the suspension a bit before cranking on the front. i don't rely on it. even Sportriding Techniques book said to use the rear to test the traction of some streets. and with a passenger, i'm able to crank more on the rear.

well, i didn't intend on a 'use rear or not' thread, i just want to know if my new 999 has a problem (don't say it is me!)
:)
 

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I would venture to say no problem. Rarely do I use the rear brake, probably coming to stop in a parking lot with the handlebars turned, thats about it.
 

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spalding12 said:
if i'm going to spend 33K US on a bike.... i should be able to decide if i want my rear brakes to be more effective
You can decide. Go buy better rear brakes. Doesn't mean Ducati has to include the best rear brakes out there for your 33K though. If they want to neuter the brakes they can if they want. Just like car makers neuter the top speed of cars.

On the street is there need to have an all powerful rear brake? Not sure there is. The front brakes gives you plenty of stopping power for the street.
 

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grendels_arm said:
You can decide. Go buy better rear brakes. Doesn't mean Ducati has to include the best rear brakes out there for your 33K though. If they want to neuter the brakes they can if they want. Just like car makers neuter the top speed of cars.

On the street is there need to have an all powerful rear brake? Not sure there is. The front brakes gives you plenty of stopping power for the street.
rear brakes have NOTHING to do with stopping a bike... they have to do with adjusting your line in a curve or turn
using the rear brake allows you to tighten your line in a turn
no racer uses the rear brake for stopping, essentially

it's just another option
and as for buying better brakes....
there isn't anything wrong with the brakes in the 999... they just don't activate enough because of the way they have been calibrated at the factory

and.....
i shouldn't expect the BEST REAR BRAKES FOR 33k?
what does THAT mean..... you get the best front brakes and rear brakes cost a fraction of that because of their relative size

for 33K..... you freakin' better expect the best
 

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First of all I'm not exaggerating. Over the last 25 years of riding I've had to pick up more kids from panic rear brake lock ups than just about any other cause. We had one die when he locked up and slid under a truck just last month. Using the rear to adjust the line is an advanced skill that is really not needed at street speeds. Can some people use it? Sure, you seem to be one that can use the rear to improve your line. Most average riders get very little benefit from its use with a large increase in risk. The 999 rear brake is weak; you can lock it up if you press hard enough on it. If you are using your rear to settle the suspension on the street I suspect you’re riding too hard and fast in that environment and/or your suspension needs more sorting out. On the track, go for it.

For your original question Spider, it’s not you, I think your bike is normal. Have the dealer check it out at the 600 just to be safe.
 

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B_Cebrian said:
First of all I'm not exaggerating. Over the last 25 years of riding I've had to pick up more kids from panic rear brake lock ups than just about any other cause. We had one die when he locked up and slid under a truck just last month. Using the rear to adjust the line is an advanced skill that is really not needed at street speeds. Can some people use it? Sure, you seem to be one that can use the rear to improve your line. Most average riders get very little benefit from its use with a large increase in risk. The 999 rear brake is weak; you can lock it up if you press hard enough on it. If you are using your rear to settle the suspension on the street I suspect you’re riding too hard and fast in that environment and/or your suspension needs more sorting out. On the track, go for it.

For your original question Spider, it’s not you, I think your bike is normal. Have the dealer check it out at the 600 just to be safe.
well,
i'm sorry about you having to pick up all those folks.
i am a pediatrician, by the way... i've seen my share of such tragedies as well (though, not in the field, like you... of course.... and my hat is off to you for all you do, by the way.... THANKS VERY MUCH)

i'm not sure why i learned to use the rear brake even at sane speeds off the track... maybe that was wrong.... but i might be too old (at 43) to re-learn now :)

i appreciate your comments and thanks for sharing the experience of that poor soul under the truck.... my prayers go out to him and his family

have a nice night
 

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Of the 5 Ducati's I've owned all had weak rear brakes, but at least usable. I wasn't much of rear braker because braking hard most of the weight is transferred to the front rendering the rear useless. With my Multi though I find myself using the rear more to settle the bike before turning, maybe it's a function of the upright position and longer travel suspension.

Try having the dealer bleed the rear and if that doesn't work replace the pad with some EBC HH or the likes.
 

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For a long time before I started riding sportbikes, I used to use the rear brake all the time in tandem with the front... I learned what was enough pressure to lock it and enough pressure to just to 'settle' it...and I felt perfectly comfortable using both sides together. I believed that it was better stopping power and indeed prevented much of the weight from shifting to the front - the "settling" effect.

But that was for bikes that carried far greater weight than these sportbikes we ride, and far "inferior" front brake stopping power. When I got into sportbikes I learned from the much lighter weights of these kinds of bike and stopping power of the front brakes that it would be downright dangerous if I continued to use the rear in tandem with the fronts, because of how easily the weight shifts. It took a little while to get used to... and nowadays I rarely ever use the rears, only when my hands are free from the handlebars and I'm stopped at an angle....so.... spalding12, it's not that difficult to get using the rear brakes off your system, as you properly should, especially on these sportbikes.

Hope that helps.
 
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