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Discussion Starter #1
In a few months I have to perform the 12,000 miles service on my '03 999 while home on leave from the wonderful Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. I will be doing the timing belt change, and valve adjustment. So...a few questions-

1. Valve adjustment-
-Where do I get a complete shim kit (as in a box with every set of shims I could need)?
-A metric feeler gauge is the only "special" tool needed for this job right?

2. Belt replacement-
-I ordered the timing belts (Ducati Omaha says they are the same as for a 998?) and a cam gear locking tool
-I plan on using the tuning fork method utilizing my laptop and a microphone for the tension but where do I get the software
-Are there any other parts needed for this job?

Keep in mind, that I must get this done in a two week time span and need to have all the parts and special tools already on hand.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Never mind about the shim kit, bought one from Desmotimes.
 

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Everything you'll need to service a duc can be found at Desmotimes.
Their Maintenance and Modification guide is a kind of "holly bible" for duc owner.
 

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i found it easier to use standard measurements.plus i have all the calipers and guages already
 

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998Robbie,

First off, I assume your leave is in relation to you being in the Armed Services. If so Thank You for your service!

I just finished my full 6000 service 200 miles ago on my 999S so everything is quite fresh in my mind. I assume you only want to do the essential oil and coolant change, valve check/adjust, and belt change due to time constraints? If so, I would consider these the bare bone tools and parts,

Basic Tools:
Hex wrenches (preferably 6-8" long T handles, mostly use 4mm - 6mm)
Needle nose pliers (for various spring clips and to hold shims)
Metric sockets with extensions
Long P2 Phillips screwdriver (to loosen the airbox clamps and to pry the front end of the airbox up when extracting the front valve cover)
Telescoping magnetic pickup tool (to extract shims and collets)
1" micrometer (measure shims)
Crank turning tool (could also use the rear wheel when in gear instead but I don't like this method)
Cam gear holding tool (for vertical cyl only)
Paint (eg. bottle of touchup paint to mark cam gear locations)
Microphone (I bought an Audio Technica lapel Lavalier mic on Ebay $24)
Laptop with mic input and tuning software (Enable Encore 30-day demo)
Torque Wrench (overcranking on your nuts is painful :D)
26 mm box wrench (to turn the belt eccentrics - more later)
Feeler gauges (The narrow ones from Desmotimes are quite good)
ThreeBond 1194 sealant (for edges of cam caps to prevent oil leaks)
Assembly lube (cam journal bearings and cam surfaces. I use Redline Assembly lube for all my engine work)

I'm sure others will bring up ones that I have missed.

Hints:
1) Don't cheat and think you can get around removing the air runners, crankcase reservoir, and radiator to save time. Just do it!
2) After you remove each part, rethread the bolts into the frame so you don't have to keep track of what bolt goes where and you won't loose any.
3) Consider removing the front wheel. If you've dropped the triples down the front forks like I have, there will be very little room to work on the horiz cyl.
4) Consider ordering the Ducati Closing Rocker Preload Kit 88713.2068. It holds the closing rockers open freeing up both hand. This makes the delicate job of getting those collets back on much easier. It was $80 well spent.



5) If you have to adjust the valves on the vertical cylinder, plug the two aft oil drain holes with bolts after you've removed the exhaust cam. If you drop a collet, this will prevent it from falling into the engine. I used two cap screws which hold the cam belt covers on. That way if I'm short two cap screws when I put the covers back on I'll remember I left them in the head! DOH!
6) If you're pressed for time, use the standard Champion spark plugs. Using the NGK substitutes will require you to modify the outer diameter of your spark plug wrench. Unless you have a lathe it will cost you some time while you grind down the socket. I had a lathe :)
7) The 26mm offset wrench that everyone claims you need to buy to adjust your eccentrics is useless on the vertical cylinder because frame members are in the way. I bought a 15 degree box wrench and modified it to engage the eccentric. The wrench clears the frame when used on the vert cyl. I sacrificed a Craftsman instead of one of my Snap-on wrenches. :D I've seen others grab the eccentric with the jaw ends of a pipe wrench. Talking about using the wrong tool on your beautiful machine!




8) Buy the Fuji nuts from Desmotimes. It's not worth re-using the ones on your bike.
9) Depending on many factors, your bike may idle and run differently after you button things up. Some people just start their bikes and ride them. I hand ground all my shims to the low end of the clearance ranges. I'm not sure if this had any effect but my bike didn't want to idle and run smoothly until I rebalanced the throttle bodies and reset the CO and fuel trim values. This will require more tools. I never thought a twin could idle and run this smoothly until I gave it all "nine yards" of tuning.




10) Don't forget to verify torque on all visible bolts!
11) Check the oil and fuel pressures when you get a chance. Most people don't do this but it is my way of baselining the mechanical performance of the bike.
12) Unbolt the clutch slave and extract the pushrod. Inspect and grease the two o-rings on the rod. I removed the clutch pressure plate and used long pipe cleaners I use to clean the gas tubes on my AR-15's to scrub the push rod passage/channel clean. Use compressed air to blow out grit that may abrade the pushrod seals.


Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yes, fantastic write up, thank you. Very nice 987 in the background btw. :) I once had a 928 and my little brother a 944.
 
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