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I recently installed an after market front brake lever that I purchased off Ebay from Desmo-Porsche. $30 vs the OE at the dealer for over $100. Anyway, went in no problem. Felt normal on application of brake with perhaps not quite as much free play before brake engagement. Anyway, two blocks down the street on a ride and the front brake locked up solid. Spit me off and lots of damage.

I know, people will say should have spent the extra to buy the OE, but we all use after market parts to some degree with no issues. And obviously had I known that the lever was not exactly like the OE, I would not have purchased it.

Subsequently read the posts about when installing a new lever, must adjust the position of the push rod that actuates the piston in the master cylinder for proper free play. Have looked all over the master cylinder and can't find any adjustment potential. The clutch lever does have a small set screw in the fitting where the push rod goes into for adjustment. Brake does not.

Can anyone tell me if in fact one can adjust and if so, where is the adjustment screw??

If one does not exist, then would say that the lever I bought has a very slight manufacturing difference from OE which when the mounting bolt is fastened thru the bore, causes the relative position at rest of the lever actuating pin to be slightly closer to the push rod.

Caveat Emptor when installing after market brake levers.
 

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Chilehead
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Sorry to hear about this.

It's not a question of OEM, ALL new levers need to be adjusted correctly, even OEM.

All levers have (or should have) an adjustment screw. The screw is always part of the lever, not the pump.

Tom
 

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If this is the lever you purchased, judging from the description, it is an OEM brake lever and not aftermarket. Brembo is listed at the manufacturer and that is the proper part number. If that is the lever you purchased then something else is probably to blame. Did you replace any other components of your brake system?
 

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Chilehead
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If
this is the lever you purchased, judging from the description, it is an OEM brake lever and not aftermarket. Brembo is listed at the manufacturer and that is the proper part number. If that is the lever you purchased then something else is probably to blame.
Alas, even this lever needs to be adjusted. The adjustment is on the pin linkage.

Tom
 

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Hello Wallycycle

Very sorry to hear of your mishap, and glad you were not injured. Hope your magnificent steed is back on the road soon. (Man, a 998...<wistful sigh..>)

Just wanted to mention that nobody would be more devastated to hear about this than Bobby at Desmo-Porsche.
I don't really think it's fair to have mentioned the name of his company, 'cause he's one of the most upstanding gentlemen I know of to do business with.
The brake lever could have come from any place.

Just my humble $.02 ........
 

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I had a similar problem with a 998 front brake lever I bought from an online store. Brake worked normal at low speed, then with a forceful application, the brake locked and would not release until the lever was completely removed. Luckily this happened as I was testing the brake and coming to a complete stop. I didn't drop the bike.

The lever originally would not fit with out some modification. That little pivoting piece that pushes the pin into the master cylinder would not slide into the holes. I thought I was getting a bargain by ordering the cheapest lever I could find. Not so much.

Sorry to hear about your crash.
 

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As LeMans said, if the pin or rod that fits into the cylinder bore is slightly longer, then the brakes never have a chance to relieve pressure and they heat up and vicious cycle as they say. The way you can tell is when you installed the lever you had to push hard on it to make it align with the mounting hole. Nie Dobrze! The rods are adjustable but know what you are doing beforehand.
 

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When I installed my Pazzo levers, one of the instructions was to measure (and record) the length of the actuation pin on the original lever precisely & then ensure that it was adjusted to the same length when the pin was transplanted to the Pazzo lever, to prevent this exact kind of situation.
 

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Alas, even this lever needs to be adjusted. The adjustment is on the pin linkage.

Tom
Point taken. My curiosity is this though; with the the rotor under constant pressure from the pads I would have expected glazing and loss of braking power before seizure.

Am I way off here?
 

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Wow Dude! Sorry to hear about your crash. I have posted about this very thing--- somewhere I can't remember, for people to be heads up about this.
I hope it and your post will save someone else from this very unhappy event.
 

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Point taken. My curiosity is this though; with the the rotor under constant pressure from the pads I would have expected glazing and loss of braking power before seizure.

Am I way off here?
YES. The constant 'drag' of the pads on the rotor surface created heat in your brakes, this caused expansion in both the rotor and the pad material until threshold heat was reached and the resulting expansion fully applied the brake. There was a similar post a few years ago on the Aprilia Forum where an aftermarket Brembo replacement lever did the same thing to a couple of guys over there. The result was the same and both crashed. FWIW, all aftermarket levers are not created equal and in the Aprilia cases, the lever was found to be faulty.....sean
 

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Dood, I'm sorry to hear about this, but glad you didn't live close to a freeway so you were at speed when it happened (In two blocks I'd be accelerating onto the freeway). And of course glad YOU weren't seriously injured.

Hope you get it squared away easily and affordably, all the way around.
 

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Your .02cents + .02cents more

I think it's good to mention who sold it, so others can keep it in their heads "when they buy" a part like this from an aftermarket seller. Especially one that sells large volumes of "no-name" parts.

And by the way they do not walk on water. I own both Ducati's and a newer Carrera Porsche and after a poor transaction with them, I'll never buy anything from him again.

There's my .02cents




Hello Wallycycle

Very sorry to hear of your mishap, and glad you were not injured. Hope your magnificent steed is back on the road soon. (Man, a 998...<wistful sigh..>)

Just wanted to mention that nobody would be more devastated to hear about this than Bobby at Desmo-Porsche.
I don't really think it's fair to have mentioned the name of his company, 'cause he's one of the most upstanding gentlemen I know of to do business with.
The brake lever could have come from any place.

Just my humble $.02 ........
 

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I just recently installed some Pazzo levers. The instructions didn't mention anything about measuring the old stock setup. But I did do a rough comparison of the old setup to the new one. I also stumbled over the threads about making sure the actuating pin is adjusted correctly. On my test ride, I didn't notice anything out of the ordinary. But I went ahead and took my bike to my dealer to have them check over the adjustment. They went ahead and added a little more free play to the clutch and brake. The nice part was they didn't penny pinch me for taking up a little of their mechanic's time so I didn't get charged for their work plus they took my bike in pretty quickly.
 

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$15,000 bike, $30 lever. Was it worth it? I don't wish to rub it in, but I would have bought the quality stuff, or left it stock. But if it was a bad install, improper adjustment, very expensive lesson.
 

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Chilehead
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The problem isn't the cost of the lever, even the most expensive lever needs to be adjusted when installed.

The problem is that your average joe isn't aware of this need, not realizing that tolerances will change as things warm up, and that what works cold may not work when hot!

Tom
 

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Not exactly on the topic but somehow related and confirming what st2lemans says.

On one of my last track day a guys rear brake caliper litteraly melted. Turned out that he changed all the fluids prior to the track day and overfilled the brake fluid reservoir. Brake got hot, no room for the fluid to expand.

I always stay inbetween the min and max mark on the reservoirs.
 

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This is good information to know. Sorry us new owners get to learn it at your expense wally. To be quite honest I was planning on replacing my discolored OEM levers on my 996 sometime in the near future and, since the Pazzos aren't in the budget, I would have likely bought that same lever from Desmo-Porsche.
 

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I think the message here is to double check any new lever installation and not that the guy bough a bad set of levers from the mentioned vendor resulting in a crash.

SF
 
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