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Discussion Starter #1
Where can I go to get an aftermarket intake kit to compliment the 50mm Termi pipes I am about to install?

Tried to search, but the verification failed every attempt... :/
 

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Moto, has everything!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Moto, has everything!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Yeah but do they have the carbon to covert a 998 atrix to the style of the 998R, except using the 998 Matrix, wonder what that would cost. I am talking to some carbon guys out of Italy on costs. Moto can you do that as well, carbon fairings painted following the 998R scheme with the Matrix Green paint?
 

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You need to find a good painter to do that, get the carbon fairings then have them painted to match the matrix green/paint scheme exactly.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
You need to find a good painter to do that, get the carbon fairings then have them painted to match the matrix green/paint scheme exactly.
yeah motos cf is way expensive, local shop will paint it for me. Just need to find the right price on fairings..
 

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I've been using for years the filters that bolt inside the airbox at the flange where the intake runners bolt to. You do have to drill 4 holes to mount both of them. I've used them on a stock 996 airbox and a Ducati performance Carbon airbox. That with a new rubber seal around the area where the tank comes in contact with the airbox turns the entire area into a large open box, of course with filtration at each intake runner. Never found any dirt inside the box, they must seal well, yet other systems look better for sealing.
 

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The filter webpage says:

"give a noticeable increase in performance"

Can anyone confirm this compared to the stock filters? I have a 50mm system but still OEM filters. Would it make sense to upgrade? cheers
Thats a load of crap if i ever saw one.
Noticable? You might gain 1 or MAYBE 2 hp at the very top, but only if you have your fueling adjusted to fit.

What DOES change is the sound of the engine (most times) and your ears will play tricks on your "seat of the pants" dyno. The Stock filters on the old superbikes (748-998) are actually very good, they have a big surface area and also reduce backpulses through the airintakes. They dont interfere with the flow around the velocitystacks. The big drawback is that if the tank is ripped of during a crasch, your going to get gravel into the airbox. Oh, And they are a pain in the ass to replace.

Just look at the what the most popular upgrades actually acheives..
This is a 999, so the same engine butt with another style of exhaust and intake.
http://www.bikeboy.org/999perftermi.html
The green is a STOCK 999
The red is the same bike, but fitted with Open Muffler, Replacement header pipe for horizontal cylinder, DP ECU, Open DP Air filters.


But what do i know.. Pipercross might have found the holy grail.. A low budget massive increase in power by just replacing one small part of the intake system. But I´m abit sceptical. :)

I´m not saying a pipercross filter is a bad investment, I´m just saying that if you expect a gain in power, your probably going to be disappointed.

Just for kicks.. You wanna see what actually DOES work?
This is tuning WITHOUT buying any parts whatsoever on a 998S.
http://www.hypertrick.net/reports/998S_camtiming.asp



//amullo
 

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??????????????????
 

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I was talking to a local tuner here. He said he run the 999r with out ANY air filter and also removed the small filters in the injectors. (I'm not sure what he meant here...)

The might be a bit extreme too.

Most of the race bikes here are fitted with a tether kill switch attached to your wrist. The bikes are required to have one of those when you do the street races. That will kill the engine if you come off and stop it from sucking gravel too I guess.

cheers
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yeah I would expect intake to maybe net you 1hp at most. Best thing you could dois just make the bike lighter. I am working to convert my 998 Matrix to as clse to a 998R as possible. Maybe in theend I will buy the light rims. But performance wise its fine as is. I just want my bike sounding and looking pretty. :)
 

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If the stock in tube filters can satisfy an engine of 150hp then an aftermarket filter is not going to give any gain on a bike with 120hp. Some aftermarket filters are better at keeping crud from the motor but i would stick with the stock set up or at least if you do want to waste some money -make sure you use the after market filters that stick in the tubes. The airtubes and filters are the least restrictive part of your ducatis induction system The biggest restriction is the turn just below the valve seat or port floor radius
 

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Old Wizard
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Pipercross Superbike Air Filters

I agree with CJS.

I recommend that you continue using your stock superbike filters mainly because they have fewer drawbacks than the aftermarket filters, and because they offer a performance advantage.

However, they do have significant drawbacks themselves. They use a single density foam that has a uniform pore size and they are run dry (i.e. without applying a dirt retention oil.) So, they flow air well, but they're not a very efficient filter and a lot of smaller dirt particles get through to the engine. This accounts for some of the dirt coating the inside of your air box, the rest might come from a leaky air box seal. The stock system is actually a two stage filter if you consider the debris filtering effect of the air duct inlet screens. So, the stock filters stop any dirt particle bigger than the foam cell size but will pass all smaller particles unless they are run with a filter oil.

As a type, foam air filters are a reasonable balance between good airflow, dust holding capacity, and filtration efficiency for small particles. The way that better foam air filters work is simple. Open cell polyurethane foam is wetted with a specially developed sticky oil. The sticky oil is suspended in the path of the dirty air on the strands of the web-like cell structure of the foam. This makes it difficult for small dirt particles to pass through the depth of the filter without sticking to the strands. Larger particles are trapped if they are bigger than the distance between the cell strands themselves.

As the outer wetted strands become loaded with dirt particles and no longer sticky, the wetted strands downstream continue trapping dirt, until the entire foam thickness is utilized. Also, as dirt particles build up on the strands the space between strands decreases, further increasing the filter efficiency by trapping the smaller dirt particles that initially could pass between the strands in a clean filter. This approach prevents the surface loading and air restriction that single-stage paper filter elements experience and consequently extends the service life of the air filter element. Finally, when the filter is sufficiently dirty to stop trapping small particles and clogging reduces airflow, it can conveniently be washed, re-oiled, and re-used. When oiling a foam air filter, use as little as possible, but do get adequate coverage.

Some manufacturers use foam as part of a multi-stage filter design. Stage 1 might be a screen or a coarse foam layer that stops larger debris from clogging up the stage 2 filter layer. Stage 2 would be a medium or fine pore foam to collect smaller particle that the stage 1 layer missed. Stage 3 could be a finer foam or cotton gauze layer that catches particles down to micron sizes. One or more of the stages can be oiled to increase filter efficiency, and the whole thing, if made sturdy enough, can be cleaned, re-oiled and reused.

There are a number of manufacturers that sell foam over-the-bellmouth filters, but there's the drawback of modifying the air box design.

One reason for using an air box and intake runners is to direct cool air to the engine. This design also results in an small pressurization of intake air that increases with speed. It also reduces the volume of the intake flow noise.

But there's also a performance benefit because the air box is a Helmholtz resonator. That is, a resonance effect occurs when you connect a suitable enclosed volume to an engine’s intake stacks causing the air inside to resonate at a frequency that results in pressure peaks coincident with the cylinders’ intake strokes. This can increase power by 10–15% within a particular rev range. Air boxes need to be well sealed and stiff in construction to maintain these resonance characteristics.

However, when you fill up a large portion of the air box volume with an aftermarket foam filter you change the resonance characteristics of the air box.

Further, if you use the auto industry's standard calculation of air required for "nil" vacuum restriction within the air filter system, you should have at least 130% of engine capacity in available air volume between the butterflies and the air filter element. Over-the-bellmouth filters don't meet that 1,300 cc volume need, so throttle response will be degraded. This is because when you crack the throttle open, it'll run rich until the air upstream of the filter gets moving. The stock system has several times that amount of air downstream of the filter in the air box ready to enter the velocity stacks unimpeded.

The only other (than stock) filter that doesn't reduce air box volume is made by Sportsbike (Australia). It mounts at the air tube entrance to the air box. It uses two pre-oiled, clean and reuse, single density foam filters. It's main drawback is that has a smaller cross-sectional area (about 7 sq. in. vs. stock 32 sq. in.) and dirt holding capacity than any other design (except for the tiny MadDuc "things" that mount on the velocity stacks.)

I think that it's important to be skeptical of the marketing hype by aftermarket filter manufacturers and their failure to provide ANY comparative dyno results that demonstrate that their product provides some performance advantage, or at least no loss in performance.

That said, after seeing the dyno chart on the Pipercross web site for the MPX038 superbike filter and the web information about the filter's construction, I installed a pair in place of the stock filters. I believe that Pipercross's multi-stage foam filter is currently the BEST FILTER AVAILABLE FOR DUCATI SUPERBIKES when used with a dirt retention oil spray and cleaned regularly. $27

They can be used to replace the stock filter elements in the stock air intake ducts. If you have the larger aftermarket carbon fiber air ducts, they won't fit (unless they are the Ducati Performance carbon fiber ducts that use the stock filters). The filtering advantage they have over the stock filter elements is that they use multiple layers of foam having different pore sizes, and they are designed to be oiled, cleaned and reused.

Also, to their credit they publish a dyno run comparison with the stock filters (below.) A 1.5hp improvement. Try finding dyno data from any other manufacturer.

Available here:

http://www.motowheels.com/italian/myproducts.cfm?parentcategoryid=1051%7C748%2D998%20Engine&productID=7061&showDetail=1&categoryID=1058|748%2D998%20Engine%20Fuel%20%26%20Air&vendoridtodisplay=0&filterFor=&collection=168%7CEuropean%20Motorcycle%20Parts

And here:

Hyperbike Centers (East)
6907 Baltimore National Pike 13-14
Frederick Maryland 21702
Tel.: 301-473-9191
www.hyperbikecenters.com

Cal-Sportbike (West)
589 Hart Lane
Sagle, Idaho 83860
Tel.: 877-234-5150
www.calsportbike.com
 

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Its a little off topic but for bang for buck as i would say combine your intube aftermarket filter with st4 intake trumpets wich are a direct fitment to any 748/916/996 . They are slightly shorter giving a stronger upper mid and top end when combined with custom mapping.

For the 998 bursi make some shorter/wider intake trumpets too . I have no back to back data on a stock bike but im sure they helped the last 998-1038cc big bore reach over 165hp
 

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Old Wizard
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I depends on what trade-offs you want to make.

Changing the induction air flow characteristics by changing the velocity stack (intake trumpet) length and inlet shape is a well established technique. The aftermarket velocity stacks are primarily intended for use on a race bike setup - they have a different length and profile than the OEM streetbike stacks.

Altering the length/shape of the inlet track will alter the shape of the power curve. The revised shape is usually designed to give max power higher up the RPM range at the cost of losing some lower down grunt (where you do most of your street riding), so they’re not ideal for a road bike. The flow changes (usually) means you have to adjust the fuel map after fitting them.
 
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