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Wrong.

By your definitions, none of the bikes you list are "collectible". Even the racebikes, which cost so much to produce, won't exceed their original value for quite some time. The SP, the R--none will ever outperform a normal investment. The nice part now is that bikes such as these can be ridden and enjoyed and will mostly maintain their value.

Not sure why you would consider the 998R more collectible than the bike of this thread. First, the frame and running gear is from the SPS, not a standard 996. The only difference with the 998R is the bore/stroke (for 3 more rpm, only at high rpm), a ventless CF tail, and slightly lighter wheels. However, there were 40% more manufactured and it will always be second. How does that work for baseball cards?
+1... What he said! ;)

I wish I had been as eloquent in my response.
 

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Wrong.

By your definitions, none of the bikes you list are "collectible". Even the racebikes, which cost so much to produce, won't exceed their original value for quite some time. The SP, the R--none will ever outperform a normal investment. The nice part now is that bikes such as these can be ridden and enjoyed and will mostly maintain their value.

Not sure why you would consider the 998R more collectible than the bike of this thread. First, the frame and running gear is from the SPS, not a standard 996. The only difference with the 998R is the bore/stroke (for 3 more rpm, only at high rpm), a ventless CF tail, and slightly lighter wheels. However, there were 40% more manufactured and it will always be second. How does that work for baseball cards?
I stand by what I posted.916SP(955) US model only,50 produced worldwide.
998R, the last and best of series.Intial cost was higher and there were not 40% more produced then 996R.Only 50 came to US.Check whats worth more and in more demand even today.
Should have said 996S for running gear.
I guess we will have to wait and see what a Ex. Fogarty,Bayliss etc. racebike will be worth in the future. My bet is more than what it cost to buy when it was immediatly done racing.Whether to use or collect. What do you think some of those old racebikes in the Ducati museum are worth?
 

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Just trying to be helpful and because I use to own one. It's officially called a 916 SPa edition...

916 SPa

I also attached the official brochure of the model. It's a cool bike and yes not very many were made 45-50 but it wasn't all that so I sold it to a museum. It wasn't a financial windfall but it sold for more than it originally cost :D
 

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I never handled waiting for Christmas morning very well. I can't believe what it must be like to not fuel it and put some miles on her. I just don't have that personality. Maybe this owner doesn't have the personality that lives to dance with these V-twin, Italian sirens like I do. Shame really.
 

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I stand by what I posted.916SP(955) US model only,50 produced worldwide.
First, you didn't specify the submodel (the 54 '96 SPa's for AMA Superbike homologation) that you are now referring to. There were substantially more non-955cc SP's distributed throughout the world in '95 and '96. I had been looking at the SPa that Ryan bought last winter (mentioned above). He got a great deal on it and then sent it to a museum, which is probably the right place for it. I didn't buy the bike myself because it was too rare and fragile to actually use.

998R, the last and best of series.Intial cost was higher and there were not 40% more produced then 996R.
500 996R. 700 998R. You can go back and forth about which is more desireable, but 700 is 140% of 500.


Should have said 996S for running gear.
Every bike you list is based on another platform. The 998R is based on the same SPS chassis. The SP's are based on their predecessors. As are the 999R, 1098R, 1198SP, etc, etc. Not a single one is all-new.

I guess we will have to wait and see what a Ex. Fogarty,Bayliss etc. racebike will be worth in the future. My bet is more than what it cost to buy when it was immediatly done racing.
It's not a question of what it was worth 1 or 2 years after new, when everything takes its greatest depreciation, although even that wouldn't have out-performed a reasonable investment over the same period. Go find out what it cost Ducati to build a works factory team bike. Even with the current six figure pricetag of a Fogarty championship machine, I guarantee you that is a drop in the bucket compared to what Ducati spent to produce it (and what it would have cost if you could have bought one brand new).
 

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvjpm1mJXlE[/url It's not a question of what it was worth 1 or 2 years after new, when [I]everything[/I] takes its greatest depreciation, although even that wouldn't have out-performed a reasonable investment over the same period. Go find out what it cost Ducati to [I]build[/I] a works factory team bike. Even with the current six figure pricetag of a Fogarty championship machine, I guarantee you that is a drop in the bucket compared to what Ducati spent to produce it (and what it would have cost [I]if[/I] you could have bought one brand new).[/quote] Wow dude, nice spin. Since this thread was about buying something USED/older, that may turn out to be collectable and MAY increase in value I suggested that an older factory Corse bike just might do that. And now you want to insinuate I ment buying a brand new factory racebike(which you can't do) as an investment?:rolleyes:You keep fooling yourself if you ever think a 996R will be more desirable or worth more than a 998R.
 

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I'm saying that even in the rosiest of scenarios, the best timing, and the finest bikes, it is almost impossible for any bike to be considered a good investment.
 
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