Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #1

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,050 Posts
All you really need aside from the basics (allen keys, allen sockets, metric sockets, wrenches) is:

Crankshaft turning tool
Cylinder head nut tool (to properly torque the nuts on the head studs)
Cam holding plate (for vertical cylinder belt change)
A good set of feeler gages for valve adjustments
A rocker pin puller (can easily be made with a socket and a nut/bolt)
Alternator cover puller (can be made with a piece of steel drilled with two holes that line up with the inspection cover bolts)
An exhaust spring puller
Small torx head for the windscreen/fairing bolts
3/8 inch and 1/2 in torque wrenches

And of course - a good quality voltmeter :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
367 Posts
I'd add to the list:
- large sockets to remove the front and rear wheels (three sizes)
- offset wrench for adjusting the timing belt tensioners (22mm iirc)
- guitar tuning software for a smart phone that displays frequency to set the timing belt tension (or other similar software and mic setup)
- differential manometer for tuning the TB air bleeds - just a loop of clear plastic tubing with some water in it and fittings to connect to the TB blanking screws

I really like using a front wheel stand as well. I've got a Baxley sport bike wheel chock which is great. It prevents me from dropping the bike while putting it on the rear stand. I also find it makes it more convenient when refilling the oil since it keeps the bike upright. I stick a block of wood under the rear wheel to level it front to back. I've been thinking about getting a front stand that will lift from the triple clamp to help with working on the forks, but in the past I've just lifted the frame using a wooden stand I made and some tie down straps. Worked fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the advice, I'll start putting that all together! I think the first project I'll be tackling is replacing the clutch components, basket, friction plates, etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
can you advise me on the best torque wrench to purchase for work on the bike. or at least a good brand with several, reasonably priced models? I've had a lot of trouble finding newton meter torque wrenches online so far. if you could point me to some sites or products that have worked for you, i'd appreciate it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,050 Posts
Oh boy that's a whole can o worms right there, along with "what tires should I use" and "what oil is best". Personally I stick to the cheap torsion type bars for most work (they run 20-30$ for a good one). For some reason all my local shops only stock micrometer wrenches graduated in inch-pounds (up to a max of like 15-20 lb/ft, which is useless for my work).

If I have to do internal stuff (inside the motor I mean) I borrow a decent wrench. The best I've used is Snap On but they are, ahem, pricey.

I've bought cheap (50$) torque wrenches in the past and they usually break or get out of whack in a hurry. I've stuck with the torsion bar wrenches since then. They are crude but they work and they are durable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Torsion bar as in the wrenches with the needle gauge on them instead of a mircrometer twist grip?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
240 Posts
WOW! I haven't been on here in 6months, i logged on for this very same reason, and bam! there it was right in my face exactly what I was looking for.

I just picked up a 996S, a great stable mate so far my 749S and 1098S. So far one of each! You have to love these things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
can you advise me on the best torque wrench to purchase for work on the bike. or at least a good brand with several, reasonably priced models? I've had a lot of trouble finding newton meter torque wrenches online so far. if you could point me to some sites or products that have worked for you, i'd appreciate it!
You're going to need two or three different torque wrenches due to the wide range of torque values. For 50+ lbs, I use a Precision Instrument C3FR250F split beam because of the very positive click feedback. Good value, too. I've tried Craftsman, Husky, even the Snap-On digital and prefer this when working on the car or motorcycle. For the lower torques, the Crafstman seem to be good enough. But as JEC stated, it's all personal preference so see if you can try some that your friends may have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
I have Matco torque wrenches- 1/4", 3/8" & 1/2". I have been abusing these poor things daily for 10 years and the continue to work well. Annually, I send them into Team Torque to have them recalibrated, but other than that there is no maintenance and are warrantied for life if something should ever happen.

The only caveat is they are a little pricey. However, once I buy something I don't want to buy it again because it broke or wore out. Had my fair share of that.

Also, skip the digital torque wrenches- they blow. The batteries die and the vibration/ beeping to let you know you've achieved the proper torque leaves room for error. Also, avoid the dial torque wrenches- again, room for error. I buy the twist-handle torque wrenches that have a spring in the head that clicks when you hit the correct value.

Just some thoughts.

---Matt---
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,050 Posts
Torsion bar as in the wrenches with the needle gauge on them instead of a mircrometer twist grip?
Yep. They are fine for "rough" values or heavy torque (100-200lb/ft on wheels and clutch assemblies for example). But for delicate stuff (under 20-25 lb/ft) or parts that are torque critical (head studs) they are not precise enough.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top