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Thanks for the advice! What is the best method to verify the relief of back pressure?
The clutch lever should have some free play before you feel resistance at the lever. This allows fluid to expand and return to the reservoir.

The standard test for detecting worn-out clutch plate friction material is to check for slippage when accelerating WOT in top gear. Some people are just harder on clutches than others, so service mileage will vary over a wide range.

You can often stop slippage by maintaining the force pushing the plates together. The idea here is to maintain the 38 mm new stack height as the friction material wears off and reduces the thickness of each plate. The higher the stack height, the more the springs are shortened/compressed, and the greater the force pushing the plates together. The clutch slips when there's not enough force supplied by the springs or the friction material is worn completely off.

The service limit on 3 mm friction plates is 2.8 mm. For 2.5 mm plates the service limit is 2.3 mm.

The plain metal plates come in stock 2.5 mm or 3 mm thicknesses. When the overall plate stack height wears 0.5 mm, replace one 2.5 mm flat plate with a 3 mm one. At 1 mm stack height wear, repeat for a second flat plate. At 1.4 mm - 1.6 mm wear, replace all the friction plates. Allowable friction plate wear is 0.2 mm (each).

Ducati considers both the plates and clutch basket to be wear items. By the time you need to replace the worn-out clutch plates the basket has been notched from the impact loads of the plates. Ducati specifies the allowable gap between the plates and basket as a quite small 0.6 mm, effectively saying to replace the basket and plates together.

Also check the pressure plate throwout bearing and pushrod for smooth rotation.
 

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I think I will look at adjusting the actuation point on the lever. It is possible that as things heated up they have even less play.
If the master cylinder and levers are stock, then I caution you against trying to adjust the lever free play. This is adjusted at the factory by Brembo and needs no further adjustment.

You can determine if the tiny compensating port (on the left in the illustration below) in the master cylinder is blocked — or covered by a misadjusted piston — by opening the reservoir cover and checking to see if there is surface movement of the reservoir fluid during the free play portion of the lever pull. You should see a little squirt of fluid before you feel resistance at the lever.

Also see:

http://www.ducati.ms/forums/80-hall...master-cylinder-adjustment-2.html#post5824849
 

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