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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all I’m struggling with a fuse blowing on my 2001 996. I was riding home one day and my gas light was on when I came to a light and had to do a quick stop. The bike shut off and couldn’t restart. I assumed I ran out of fuel. Nice guy filled me up and she cranks but doesn’t start. Fuel pump not priming. I got her back home and started going through it. Replaced the fuse and fuel pump works. Regardless I installed a new pump and filter. I take her for a ride no issues. I’m coming off an on ramp and she dies. Fuse blown. Replace fuse and fires up.

Here is the thing I don’t understand. I can replace fuse, fire up, idle and ride away but the instant I close the throttle the fuse pops. Stopped in Neutral I can rev her up and down with no issues at all.

Thoughts?
 

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Check the wiring for the fuse holder; on my 916 the fuse holder itself plus some of the wiring around it melted and although the metal part of the fuse was still intact & the fuel pump was still working it wouldn't have been long before something gave.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Check the wiring for the fuse holder; on my 916 the fuse holder itself plus some of the wiring around it melted and although the metal part of the fuse was still intact & the fuel pump was still working it wouldn't have been long before something gave.
The holder and wiring, from what I actually see, looks ok. No melting or anything obvious.
 

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You have a short. Fuses only blow if the circuit the fuse protects shorts to ground. To troubleshoot this, take a DVOM and place the leads where the fuse terminals go. You may need a pair of spade terminals to help make this happen.

With the fuse removed, and the meter in place, turn the key to on. The meter should register no voltage. Move the wires for the fuel pump circuit around and keep an eye on the meter. When it registers voltage, you've found the short.

From there it is just a matter of tracing down the exact location of the short. Or, you could leave the fuse in and do the same thing...using a meter saves on fuses though. .......sean

PS....a test light will work also if no meter is available.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You have a short. Fuses only blow if the circuit the fuse protects shorts to ground. To troubleshoot this, take a DVOM and place the leads where the fuse terminals go. You may need a pair of spade terminals to help make this happen.

With the fuse removed, and the meter in place, turn the key to on. The meter should register no voltage. Move the wires for the fuel pump circuit around and keep an eye on the meter. When it registers voltage, you've found the short.

From there it is just a matter of tracing down the exact location of the short. Or, you could leave the fuse in and do the same thing...using a meter saves on fuses though. .......sean

PS....a test light will work also if no meter is available.
SOLVED!

When I had the bike apart and the pump running I bumped the tank and it sparked on the frame. I checked and the fuel pump housing has 12 volts. I took the fuel sender off and found this. (Attached) I suspect that’s my problem!
 

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SOLVED!

When I had the bike apart and the pump running I bumped the tank and it sparked on the frame. I checked and the fuel pump housing has 12 volts. I took the fuel sender off and found this. (Attached) I suspect that’s my problem!
I'd say that's a likely culprit. Glad to see you found it......sean
 
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