Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
640 Posts
The main issue to be concerned with is the in-line connectors between the regulator harness and the stator wires. They corrode and loosen causing a high electrical resistance to develop a local hot spot. A 1 ohm resistance will generate 900 watts of heat in the connector and adjacent wiring.

The resulting heat damages the wire's insulation, the wires short together, and this can cause the regulator internal circuits to be damaged. It's best to eliminate the connector entirely by soldering the wires directly. You need to use SWG 12 gauge wire between the engine case and the wiring of the R/R.

There's no reason to replace a functioning regulator.

However, the major reason why Ducati regulators fail is that full fairing bikes like the 916 don't provide enough cooling air, particularly when stopped. The solution for full fairing bikes is to relocate the regulator to a better air-cooled location outside the fairing.

I replaced my fifth failed stock 916 regulator with an Electrex RR51 and moved it to a location outside of the fairing and into the air stream. I extended the wiring and mounted it on the underside of the license plate holder facing the rear tire where it’s hardly noticeable.
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
315 Posts
First- you want a MOSFET based regulator. There are two versions worth considering.

The best regulator available is the Shindengen FH020aa. This comes stock on all new Panigale, and also on a host of other bikes.
You can buy a kit from roadstercycle dot com.

Ricks Electrics makes a really nice MOSFET regulator that includes a direct fit harness. Ive been testing these for the last year, and so far they are working flawlessly.

Anything other than a Shindengen or a Ricks is not going to work for long. Searching this- or any- forum will show you this is stark detail.

Direct wiring anything is not a great idea, IMO.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top