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You mentioned earlier that you use an untrasonic cleaner for some parts. Could you the ultrasonic for calipers as well or will this damage the finish?
Pretty sure he covered this already. Great to see this thread back on track BTW........sean
 

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Discussion Starter #83
Cleaning the calipers

You mentioned earlier that you use an untrasonic cleaner for some parts. Could you the ultrasonic for calipers as well or will this damage the finish?
The ultrasonic cleaner doesn't normally remove paint if you use a noninvasive fluid.
Basically, I use a diluted solution of Simple Green so the grease comes off easily.
You could also use plain water, but I like to speed things up.

The cleaning action comes from microscopic bubbles created by the high frequency waves.
The paint came out looking like new.
See sample below.
 

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Discussion Starter #84
Fork install

Installing the front forks seems like an easy no-brainer task.
I did follow the shop manual instructions and set the fork height properly.
The specification is 268mm from the bottom of the triple clamp to the flat top of the fork (see diagram).

I get both forks close and then I dial in the exact amount from the fork to the top triple to get them in balance. Usually they come out to within .25mm or 0.010". This is close enough. At this point, I tighten and torque all the bolts.

I did some detail work on the storage compartment at the rear. Besides cleaning everything up, I bought a new rubber "X" piece to hold the original tool kit (came with the bike) and a new owner's manual from Ducati (they still supply them).

I think having an owner's manual is important because the manual has a lot of important info in it and it is a finishing touch.
 

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Discussion Starter #85
Getting the bike up on 2 wheels

It was a big deal for me to get the 900SS up on two wheels again. It felt like it had been a long time. Disconnecting the engine from the engine stand and getting the headers and mufflers back on was another landmark. Now it really started to look better.

I loaded the handle bars with the newer switch gear I got from my friend, Jeff. He also supplied the original type clip-ons as the bike came with some aftermarket ones. Getting everything just right on the handle bars is a struggle. I think the clutch side was off/on a couple of times to get the cold-start cable in the right place. Then all the wiring harnesses have to routed, the levers set, etc.

Bolting on the brakes isn't difficult, but bleeding them can be a pain. The rear caliper has to be rotated to the top so that all the air is removed. My friend, Mike helped with that as I don't have three hands. The front required some time to get the master cylinder bled out; the front calipers were relatively easy after that. It is a pleasure having fresh brakes and fluid.

I did retain the Galfer brake lines, but replaced the clutch line with an OEM type I had on hand. It is hard to give up the feel of braided lines.

The bodywork is coming up next.
 

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Bolting on the brakes isn't difficult, but bleeding them can be a pain. The rear caliper has to be rotated to the top so that all the air is removed. My friend, Mike helped with that as I don't have three hands. The front required some time to get the master cylinder bled out; the front calipers were relatively easy after that. It is a pleasure having fresh brakes and fluid.
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This prompted me to try a vacuum bleeder and I have never looked back.
 

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Discussion Starter #88
This prompted me to try a vacuum bleeder and I have never looked back.
I have a vacuum bleeder, but it isn't the end-all to bleeding problems. It is also messy. I haven't owned one that doesn't leak brake fluid at some point (hand pump type).
 

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I have a vacuum bleeder, but it isn't the end-all to bleeding problems. It is also messy. I haven't owned one that doesn't leak brake fluid at some point (hand pump type).
I've had the cheap-o $25 one from Harbor Freight for about 3 years now. It's been a fantastic help on the countless brake jobs I've done (and clutch jobs), both cars and motorcycles, but I agree, it doesn't solve all bleeding problems. I have had to finish a number of jobs by manually bleeding.
All jobs which involve brake fluid invariably has you cleaning up the stuff off of the caliper, rotor, wheel, floor, etc.
Oh yeah, mine leaks a bit too. No surprises there.
 

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Discussion Starter #90
Next steps

Before I started mounting the bodywork, I did a few steps first.

The air box needed to be prepped with a good cleaning, new filter element and then mounted on the carbs. It sounds so easy now, but getting the air box to sit properly in the frame and the mounting bolts all lined up was a struggle.

The oil cooler went on next so I could fill the engine up with oil. Then a new battery was installed in the air box.

One note about battery installation; use new rubber straps from Ducati if yours are crap or broken. The price is reasonable and, if the air box is off, the install is easy. I would guess that more than half the bikes that I have bought had these straps broken or missing.

Before I started putting the tank back together, the fuel pump needed to be tested. Remember that this bike had sat for a long time with old gas in the tank. The filter hit the trash can on the first day, but I hadn't tested the pump. Hooking it up to a battery yielded nothing - it was stuck. As I have a selection of spare parts available, a 2001 750 Monster fuel pump was pressed into service. It tested fine, but had a different style electrical plug. The old one was a bolt-on style and the newer one had a more modern push-in plug. I made a wiring splice into the old harness using the newer plug. Problem solved!

I loaded the tank with the pump, new filter and new fuel lines. It all fit fine.

The tank was mounted on the bike along with the front fairing (with new windshield) and tail panels.
 

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a 2001 750 Monster fuel pump was pressed into service. It tested fine, but had a different style electrical plug. The old one was a bolt-on style and the newer one had a more modern push-in plug. I made a wiring splice into the old harness using the newer plug. Problem solved!
This made me curious so I looked the 01 m750 should have been a carby which is good but they used a vacuum fuel pump NOT a electric one. If you used a electric one from a monster it may be for an injected bike which may overpower your floats. Just double check you save yourself some headaches later. Carbys need a low pressure pump .
 

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Discussion Starter #92
This made me curious so I looked the 01 m750 should have been a carby which is good but they used a vacuum fuel pump NOT a electric one. If you used a electric one from a monster it may be for an injected bike which may overpower your floats. Just double check you save yourself some headaches later. Carbys need a low pressure pump .
Thanks Ducvet, it should work as the M750 was a carb version and the fuel line system is recirculating before the carbs so I don't see a problem with pressure. The recirculation line has a restrictor in it which, while crude, allows for a minor pressure differential. So it is this restriction that creates the pressure to the carbs and not the pump.

More Ducati trivia!
 

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Starting the engine

After adding gas and fooling around with the ignition wires (I had them reversed). The engine started up and ran great (see short video here:
).

I am getting close to finishing up this project, but there are always the final small details that take time.
Looking forward to the first ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #95
First test ride

Yesterday, I was able to ride the 900SS around the block to test that all systems were a go. The idle still needs some adjustment, but the throttle response is good, the brakes work and the suspension suspends. All the lights work which is one of my pet peeves; I hate it when things don't work.

With the shake down run over, I bolted on the fairing and the mirrors for an extended run. The chain needed some adjustment, but there are no concerning issues like oil/fuel/brake fluid leaks.

I have to say it is looking pretty good now with all the major parts bolted on. One area that is starting to catch my eye is the chopped rear fender/plate holder and the obviously incorrect turn signals. That is something I will have to address later by ordering new parts from Ducati. For now, I will ride the bike a bit and enjoy it.

The extended ride went well. I like the handling and while not as razor sharp as my modified 900SSie, it still rolls the corners well. The engine is nice and torquey with adequate top end power for the street. I mean, how fast do you want to go in modern traffic anyway? All in all, I would say job done mechanically except for some more idle fiddling.
 

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Yesterday, I was able to ride the 900SS around the block to test that all systems were a go. The idle still needs some adjustment, but the throttle response is good, the brakes work and the suspension suspends. All the lights work which is one of my pet peeves; I hate it when things don't work.



With the shake down run over, I bolted on the fairing and the mirrors for an extended run. The chain needed some adjustment, but there are no concerning issues like oil/fuel/brake fluid leaks.



I have to say it is looking pretty good now with all the major parts bolted on. One area that is starting to catch my eye is the chopped rear fender/plate holder and the obviously incorrect turn signals. That is something I will have to address later by ordering new parts from Ducati. For now, I will ride the bike a bit and enjoy it.



The extended ride went well. I like the handling and while not as razor sharp as my modified 900SSie, it still rolls the corners well. The engine is nice and torquey with adequate top end power for the street. I mean, how fast do you want to go in modern traffic anyway? All in all, I would say job done mechanically except for some more idle fiddling.


It looks great! I'm still fiddling with the idle as well with my 95 900ss/CR. I synced the carbs as that helped, but still have a minor issue I'm working out. Great thread BTW!
 

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Discussion Starter #98
New verses old

I wanted to share a recent photo of my 900SS at the dealer.
They asked me to ride my bike over for a look-see.

Then, I took a photo of the 1996 900SS with a new 2017 Supersport.
Which would you rather have?

The cost for the classic SS is less than half of the new one and will only appreciate in value verses certain depreciation of the new Supersport.

Obviously, the performance is different, but how much do you really need or can use?
 

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