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Discussion Starter #62
I find it interesting that your swingarm has some marring on the upper brace just above the weld by the adjuster. Visible in photographs of both sides of the swingarm. The used aluminum swingarm I picked up on ebay a few years back has damage/marring in the same location. I can't, for the life of me, figure out what it's from.
If you go back and look at the photos of the bike when I bought it, the pipes were the high-mount type and passed next to the area that has the marks. The pipe must have been rubbing the swing arm. I removed the high pipes as I am going back to the stock low-mount pipes. I consider the swing arm marks as part of the history and character of the bike so it doesn't bother me.
 

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This thread makes me so happy :laugh:. Looks like your doing an amazing job.. I'm in Socal as well and wondering where you got that instrument cluster surround? My 96' is in good shape with only 7k miles- but foam is curling very slightly on the edges- where did you get your cluster refurbed? Awesome work!!! great to see another carby being cared for so well.
 

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This thread makes me so happy :laugh:. Looks like your doing an amazing job.. I'm in Socal as well and wondering where you got that instrument cluster surround? My 96' is in good shape with only 7k miles- but foam is curling very slightly on the edges- where did you get your cluster refurbed? Awesome work!!! great to see another carby being cared for so well.
You may be able to buy just the foam (it's a separate part). Try Stein-Dinse or Ducati Omaha...
 

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Discussion Starter #65
Instrument cluster surround

This thread makes me so happy :laugh:. Looks like your doing an amazing job.. I'm in Socal as well and wondering where you got that instrument cluster surround? My 96' is in good shape with only 7k miles- but foam is curling very slightly on the edges- where did you get your cluster refurbed? Awesome work!!! great to see another carby being cared for so well.
Thanks for the kind comments on the thread.

I lucked into buying the instrument panel. My local dealer, Ducati of Newport Beach, did a dealer search and found the part in Dallas. I ordered the part from them.

Mine came as a complete unit, the foam wasn't separate, but the parts book does show a separate number for the foam surround.

I needed the complete panel because my mounts were broken, a common problem.

PM me and I will give you the contact for the instrument redo.
 

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You may be able to buy just the foam (it's a separate part). Try Stein-Dinse or Ducati Omaha...
This is what I received from Ducati when i ordered just the foam last year. It was for my other SS that I sold- its like the material found on the 748's and 996's of early 2000's and was not happy with it. Was odd that it was the grey material and had marks where the cuts where made to accommodate the circular instruments- Anyway- i'll pm you- don't want to hijack the thread. My instruments are good just wondered about that foam but good to know thats what comes when you get the whole piece.
 

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Thanks for the kind comments on the thread.

I lucked into buying the instrument panel. My local dealer, Ducati of Newport Beach, did a dealer search and found the part in Dallas. I ordered the part from them.

Mine came as a complete unit, the foam wasn't separate, but the parts book does show a separate number for the foam surround.

I needed the complete panel because my mounts were broken, a common problem.

PM me and I will give you the contact for the instrument redo.

Will PM you- i really like those guys at Newport- we have Ducati Westlake near me and they aren't good for much unless your buying a brand new Panigale or Diavel...
 

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Discussion Starter #68
Brake work

I found some time to clean and rebuild the brakes. While the brakes worked fine, they were encrusted with old brake dust. My goal was to get every part looking good again.

The calipers needed a complete teardown. I split the front and rear calipers and saved the O-rings (luckily, they all seemed reusable). After scrubbing as much of the brake dust off the parts as possible, they took a bath in the ultrasonic cleaner. While not perfect, the calipers turned out pretty good. All the hardware received a good cleaning too. The piston seals all looked good so the calipers went back together.

The rear floating linkage got a good cleaning and inspection too.

Both the front and rear brake lines were from Galfer and while the fittings were faded, the lines looked good so I decided to reuse them. They are one of the few non-standard parts on the bike as I just couldn't bring myself up to buying new rubber OE lines. Oh well, that is still a future option at this point.

All in all the brakes turned out ok.
 

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Question, what method did you use to remove the pistons? I have always either used compressed air or pumped the brake just enough to get the pistons to clear the seal, but I've only had bikes and cars with single sided calipers with one or two pistons. I figure either of those methods would be a bit more difficult with a 4 pot caliper.
The calipers on my SS are in need of the same treatment, thus the inquiry.
 

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Discussion Starter #71
Question, what method did you use to remove the pistons? I have always either used compressed air or pumped the brake just enough to get the pistons to clear the seal, but I've only had bikes and cars with single sided calipers with one or two pistons. I figure either of those methods would be a bit more difficult with a 4 pot caliper.
The calipers on my SS are in need of the same treatment, thus the inquiry.
Actually, my method is simple and easy. After the calipers are split, I use the circlip pliers shown in the photos to grab the pistons from the inside area. Then, with a twist and a tug, the pistons come out.

Theoretically, you could try compressed air before splitting the calipers to get the pistons started. This requires a thin piece of wood (plywood) be inserted to "catch" the pistons. If you don't do this, one of the pistons will pop out and then, the air pressure is useless.

When the calipers are apart it is good time to replace items like bleeders/hardware if they are rough looking.

Clean calipers should be considered a maintenance item every 2-3 years and it forces you to change the brake fluid too; always a good thing!

Obviously, this is a great time to replace the brake pads if they need it, mine were good to go (or stop!).
 

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Actually, my method is simple and easy. After the calipers are split, I use the circlip pliers shown in the photos to grab the pistons from the inside area. Then, with a twist and a tug, the pistons come out.

Theoretically, you could try compressed air before splitting the calipers to get the pistons started. This requires a thin piece of wood (plywood) be inserted to "catch" the pistons. If you don't do this, one of the pistons will pop out and then, the air pressure is useless.

When the calipers are apart it is good time to replace items like bleeders/hardware if they are rough looking.

Clean calipers should be considered a maintenance item every 2-3 years and it forces you to change the brake fluid too; always a good thing!

Obviously, this is a great time to replace the brake pads if they need it, mine were good to go (or stop!).
Thanks for the info! I've got a couple sets of circlip pliers, so I'll give that a shot when I get the calipers split.

I'm fairly well versed in brakes at this point (just not 4 pistons floaters yet), so everything else I'm familiar with, such as being able to identify worn or damaged parts.

I fully agree that a full caliper clean should be done regularly. On my daily rider, I tend to burn through a set of front pads every two years, and I completely disassemble the calipers for a full clean every time the pads are changed out and naturally fill the system with fresh fluid. 120,000 miles and not a single brake system failure, original master cylinder too.

This reminds me that I need to order up new pads for the SS. The Green Stuff's on it are quite thin and produce an obscene amount of dust! One 220 mile ride and my freshly cleaned wheels were covered in a noticeable layer of brake dust.
 

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Discussion Starter #73
Thanks for the info! I've got a couple sets of circlip pliers, so I'll give that a shot when I get the calipers split.

I'm fairly well versed in brakes at this point (just not 4 pistons floaters yet), so everything else I'm familiar with, such as being able to identify worn or damaged parts.

I fully agree that a full caliper clean should be done regularly. On my daily rider, I tend to burn through a set of front pads every two years, and I completely disassemble the calipers for a full clean every time the pads are changed out and naturally fill the system with fresh fluid. 120,000 miles and not a single brake system failure, original master cylinder too.

This reminds me that I need to order up new pads for the SS. The Green Stuff's on it are quite thin and produce an obscene amount of dust! One 220 mile ride and my freshly cleaned wheels were covered in a noticeable layer of brake dust.
120K miles on a Kawasaki EX500 - wow! You are a better man than me.

Brake maintenance is often over looked by the majority of riders.
You will only regret the brakes not working once.
 

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120K miles on a Kawasaki EX500 - wow! You are a better man than me.

Brake maintenance is often over looked by the majority of riders.
You will only regret the brakes not working once.
Hehe, I get that reaction all the time when I mention how many miles are on my little old 500. It's going up all the time too, should be close to 130k by the end of the year.

Alright, I've strayed enough off topic for now, can't wait to see more updates on your project.
 

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Discussion Starter #75 (Edited)
Minor frame crack repair

That is a classic "cracked frame" since you are going through the bike you might as well finish it off. You can get the crack welded up by a good welder and you should be fine after that, I have never seen one properly repaired re-crack. By the tank mount it must be either a early attempt 96 where they changed the style of tank mount but not the process and they still cracked.

More work but it will be worth it once fixed and a fresh coat of powder applied.
Thanks for the tips Ducvet.

I want to keep the frame finish original and try to preserve the factory stickers as much as possible so I will try to touch up the weld repair. My painter, who does work for my local dealer, says he can make up some matching paint for touch-up.

While I am not a professional fabricator, I do have some experience at working with metal. After talking to my welder, the area was prepped by removing the paint, stop-drilling the crack at both ends and grinding a trough for the welding (see photos). It looks like the photo order is backwards so you will have to look in reverse.

My welder friend confirmed that MIG welding can cause the crack in the frame. After he laid down the TIG bead, I ground it down and applied etch primer to protect the metal until it gets touched up. Part of the factory sticker was lost, but I can live with it.
 

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Are you welding in a gusset? I ask as mine has a similar crack in same location and thinking as the crack hasn't enlarged over time I may get away with just welding. I have a gusset made but to weld it in will make a big mess (I'm not stripping the frame, will do in situ).

Cheers.
 

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Most of the frame crack repairs We had done were without added gussets, no issues after. you can see the factory gusset in his picture did not help the original problem it is fixed by a better weld. I am not a good welder so will let others tell you what that truly is but again the repaired frames have never been a problem that I know of and some were done 20 years ago. Before we knew ducati would replace the frame we had them welded and it took care of the issue.

I will add on some race bikes we did add additional bracing but that had nothing to do with the cracking frames.
 

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Discussion Starter #78
Are you welding in a gusset? I ask as mine has a similar crack in same location and thinking as the crack hasn't enlarged over time I may get away with just welding. I have a gusset made but to weld it in will make a big mess (I'm not stripping the frame, will do in situ).

Cheers.
The crack is apparently caused by the stress riser created by the factory MIG weld and not a frame design weakness so no gusset is needed. The crack in my frame looked like it had been stable for over 20 years and probably would have not caused a problem, but better to fix it now.
 

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Discussion Starter #80
Prepping the frame and mating it to the engine

After the frame crack repair, it was time to detail the frame. Doing a though clean and inspection of the wiring harness is important. I found an area of wiring going into the voltage regulator that needed to re-insulated where it had rubbed against the frame.

With everything cleaned, it was time to reunite the engine and the frame. This is the moment when the assemblage of parts starts to take on the image of a bike. The engine mount bolt/nuts were carefully torqued and then voila! A Ducati appeared in my driveway.

I started to add more parts to the basic structure like the clutch. I elected to use a standard clutch with fresh parts including a new pressure plate bearing. I am always amazed at how far some owners let their clutches go before servicing them. It is almost like a really noisy dry clutch is a badge of honor when it is really a sign of neglect.

Finally, the rebuilt carbs were wrestled into place. Getting the throttle cables attached and routed correctly along with all of the fuel lines, drain hoses and vent tubes is a feat!

Before I stopped for the day, the foot rest brackets were bolted back on after they had been thoroughly cleaned and detailed.
 

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