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I bought a museum quality 900SS 1991 model with history and thrash the hell out of it the way it was meant to be rode. Yeah, FCR's are on it now and there are no regrets. In 16 months I have 5 trackdays and 10,000 miles of sex with my leathers on. This is what the SuperSport was for, not some living room decoration or some punters investment oppty.

Your opinion may vary of course, which I would respect only once you take on a track day with me. But you would have to take the bike off the coffee table to do that, wouldn't you?
(edit)
Maybe this was a bit over the top - my apologies OP and others on this thread.

But sure, if you have the witherall to hold pristine examples of significant bikes that are never ridden - fine. It's like art at the Louvre. But, I gotta know you have others you ride otherwise I feel you are cheating the world of riders that can really enjoy the bike. I dunno, but maybe governments going to outlaw combustion engines in my lifetime and I say throw your leg across it while you still can. I mean, I cannot ride my SuperSport in Paris to visit the Louvre with a hot French girl now, it is illegal and this is only the start of similar laws. Realistically, I think my bike could be impounded in California today, and this is a factor in planning my trip to see friends in Humboldt. // end rant//
 

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That is a classic "cracked frame" since you are going through the bike you might as well finish it off. You can get the crack welded up by a good welder and you should be fine after that, I have never seen one properly repaired re-crack. By the tank mount it must be either a early attempt 96 where they changed the style of tank mount but not the process and they still cracked.

More work but it will be worth it once fixed and a fresh coat of powder applied.
 

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The refreshed gauges look great! From what I've read, these gauges are supposed to be difficult to disassemble. Your shop didn't seem to have any problems, though. Are they open to more work? If so, can you share the name?
 

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Then I wonder where some of us will go who made a career out of changing them, is hot rodding /modifying saving or creating zombie bikes ...lol
Are we better do have clapped out beat donor bikes left for parts or restoration or nice but not going back to stock bikes. Walt Siegl has sent a few to such a place and I fear there may be a ducati chopper or ATV out there somewhere.
Lol. Yup - saw an article recently about a shop that built a MX sidecar out of an ST4. The thing looked quite a beast. Ahh, yup here...


http://www.bikeexif.com/ducati-sidecarcross - for the article.
 

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That is a classic "cracked frame" ...

More work but it will be worth it once fixed and a fresh coat of powder applied.
Indeed it is - better check the swingarm welds too!!!
For originality better to paint rather than powder though no??
Also what about the frame stickers - can these be had / re-manufactured??
 

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Discussion Starter #46
Cylinder heads

Next is the cylinder head reconditioning. The heads arrived back from the machine shop nice and clean from the soda blasting.

The shop checked the guides and recut the valves. They said it all looked good. I do my own valve seat cutting with a motorized Neway cutter. The seats were cut and the valves lapped in.

Assembling the heads is always a bit of a chore. New bearings/seals went into the head for the cams. The rocker arms needed some fiddling to get centered with the correct shims. Next, the usual valve adjustment dance began with forays out to get the seemingly always missing valve adjustment shim. It doesn't seem to matter how many shims I have!

In the end, the heads are now ready to install. It is so much easier and nicer to do the valve adjustment on the bench.

On to the bottom end of the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #47
Bottom end work

Because the cases were split, the crank pre-load had to be checked/reset. This is always a case of check the end float without one of the shims and then calculate the needed preload. After some fiddling and searching through my shim stash, I came up with 0.15mm of preload on the crank bearings.

I also installed the new (used) transmission and set the end float on the gear shafts and the shift drum. Again a fiddly job requiring much busy work installing and removing the crankcase halves, torqueing bolts, changing shims and re-measuring.

When all this was done, I could apply the magic Ducati supplied goo to the cases and seal them up.
 

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Discussion Starter #49
Finalizing the crankcase work

My biggest fear after closing the crankcase is that there might be some issue with the shifting. It is one of those 'wakeup in the middle of night with cold sweats' kind of thought.

Subsequently, I check and recheck the shifting action. With the crankcase together, I test shift the trans up and down. In this case, I renewed the broken spring on the shifter arm. One has to wonder how it shifted before; not well, I'm sure.

After the shifter was squared away, I did the usual install of the flywheel/alternator components. The ignition triggers were set with the proper gap and then the cover was installed.

On the primary gear side of the engine, I used the special Ducati tool to install the crank nut holding the primary drive gear. The clutch gear and oil pump went on next. Finally, the cover was installed.

Additionally, the cam drive sprocket was installed with a new nut (Ducati says to never re-use the locknuts).

The engine stand came with a spare engine I bought a while ago. It was bare steel that I had powder coated. It has been very handy and stable for working on the engine.

The top end is next.
 

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Discussion Starter #50
As the famous saying goes, "assembly is the reverse of disassembly". If only it was that easy!

Installing the pistons in the cylinders, adding a base gasket, O-rings and sealer, putting the pin and circlip into the piston without making a mess of it or dropping a part into the crankcase is a real pain.

Previously, I had done a trial assembly to check the deck height (1.0 to 1.1 mm) so it was good to go. The goal here wasn't to make a racing engine, but a nice representative stock engine.

In contrast, adding the heads was a piece of cake. Putting on the tensioners and belts was a little bit more effort, but it turned out well.

After installing the oil drain-back hoses (new crush washers), the engine was starting to look done.
The plan was to keep a nice patina on the engine, but I did squirt some additional black paint on the cylinders while they were off. The rest of the engine is as is after a big cleaning except the heads which were soda blasted. I'm not trying to create the Mona Lisa here, just a clean stock look.
 

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Discussion Starter #51
Carburetor rebuilding

I had been putting off the carb rebuild as I knew they were a mess. The bike had been sitting with gas in the tank and carbs for 8 years. Based on what I found in the tank, I knew the carbs would be UGLY.

The outside appearance was bad enough (see photos), but the unseen passages were sure to be plugged. Luckily, I have a small Ultrasonic cleaner which would help get the job done.

The carbs were duly disassembled and inspected. They were dirty, but no major problems. The plan was to replace the various O-rings, filters, gaskets and most importantly, the needle jets. The jets can become ovalized after as few as 5K miles. The ones I had were toast (see photo of new on left) and can really screw-up the mid-range mixture.

After a thorough cleaning, additional work was needed on some of the small passageways. Using cleaning fluid and compressed air, all the passageways finally were cleared. Some were really plugged up.

The carbs were put back together and new breather tubes were made from 1/2" EPDM black rubber tube that I sourced from McMaster-Carr. The original tubing was NLA from Ducati and this looked almost identical. With the springs installed, they looked good.

When the engine is back in the frame, I look forward to reinstalling the carbs.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
Prepping the engine for installation

The engine needs some more work before I can install it in the frame.

The intake manifolds were bolted on with new gaskets. The carb boots got a good cleaning along with the clamps in the ultrasonic bath.

I test fitted the manifold vacuum lines and as soon as I picked the lines up, the plastic "T" between the tubes snapped off. 20 year old plastic doesn't survive well. Additionally, there are restrictor jets screwed into the ends of the "T" making it a unique part. Luckily, the dealer was able to find a new one in Italy.

In the same vein, I had earlier tried to replace the fuel lines and the plastic connector just shattered in my hand. This part is NLA from Ducati so I had to make do with a brass "T"; not perfect, but functional. There is also a restrictor in the return fuel line which I discovered by examining the parts book. I was able to dig it out of the old line and reuse it.

Next is the mounting of the swing arm. After a thorough cleaning and re-greasing the pivot, it slipped onto the engine. All the bolts got the proper torque and the pivot shaft had the clips installed and then the rubber covers.

The rear shock had been rebuilt by Racetech to original specs. I set the spring length and put the adjusters in the recommended positions. It was bolted on - pretty simple.

Now I need to get the frame ready.
 

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Been following this that's great I now have a couple SS900ie granted they are injected but still. One is my daily rider the other had. Red sitting and got sir a song, that one I'm planning to make like showroom new.
I feel the pain on parts...
I'm loving your engine stand where'd you get it? I've made one and it's functional but I'd rather one like that.
 

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Discussion Starter #56
Engine stand

Been following this that's great I now have a couple SS900ie granted they are injected but still. One is my daily rider the other had. Red sitting and got sir a song, that one I'm planning to make like showroom new.
I feel the pain on parts...
I'm loving your engine stand where'd you get it? I've made one and it's functional but I'd rather one like that.
The stand is something that I got when I bought a spare engine years ago. I had it powder coated black so it wouldn't rust (it is mild steel) and it looks like someone just welded it up from square tube and plate. I like it because it can sit on a furniture dolly which makes it easy to move around.

For the later model 900SSie see my story here: http://www.ducati.ms/forums/57-supersport/468138-1999-900ssie-superlight.html
 

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The stand is something that I got when I bought a spare engine years ago. I had it powder coated black so it wouldn't rust (it is mild steel) and it looks like someone just welded it up from square tube and plate. I like it because it can sit on a furniture dolly which makes it easy to move around.



For the later model 900SSie see my story here: http://www.ducati.ms/forums/57-supersport/468138-1999-900ssie-superlight.html


Cool thanks I'll be following your build.
 

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I find it interesting that your swingarm has some marring on the upper brace just above the weld by the adjuster. Visible in photographs of both sides of the swingarm. The used aluminum swingarm I picked up on ebay a few years back has damage/marring in the same location. I can't, for the life of me, figure out what it's from.
 

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I find it interesting that your swingarm has some marring on the upper brace just above the weld by the adjuster. Visible in photographs of both sides of the swingarm. The used aluminum swingarm I picked up on ebay a few years back has damage/marring in the same location. I can't, for the life of me, figure out what it's from.
From the location of the discoloration, my guess is an exhaust leak at the silencer flange. Just a guess, but nothing else makes any sense to me.....sean
 
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