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Discussion Starter #21
Full Floaters

looks like a ton of fun lol.
I actually enjoy that kinda work.
I didn't know the full floater rotors came on the 96. Nice.
Yes, the SP model had the full-floating cast iron front brakes and the articulated rear brake.
It was a similar spec as the same year Superlight (non-USA), but with the dual seat and low-mount mufflers.

The SP is a desirable model and finding one that is not modified isn't easy. Not that there anything wrong with modifying them; I've done plenty of that.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
1997 900ss-sp

Nice so its kinda the same spec as the 97 sp which is what I have
Yes, basically the same bike with different graphics and, obviously a different color!
Mechanically, it is identical.:grin2:
 

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Discussion Starter #24
SP badge number

Here is my SP badge number: D32. I read that Ducati started using a letter prefix in 1995(?) rather than three numbers. See photo for my badge.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
Saving a Supersport...continued

The dash panel on my Supersport was loose to the touch. I tried to remove it, but only one mount was still attached to the frame. The other two had broken off. While trying to loosen the nut on the last remaining mount, the plastic just snapped. I guess after 20 years in a hot dry climate, plastic tends to get brittle and break.

The gauges needed to be restored as the indicator needles were almost white from fading (originally bright orange) and the dash surround was distorted from shrinkage. I removed the gauges and delivered them to my local speedo guy for repair and restoration.

I checked with my local Duc dealer on the dash and he said NLA. He did check other dealers in the USA and steered me to one that had a new one on the shelf. I was lucky to snag it.

Next, I spent some time cleaning the cases up. This is a thankless task until you step back and see how nice they look when done. I thought about refinishing them, but the original patina seemed more natural as they just weren't that bad.

Ordering the parts is a time consuming endeavor. The part numbers have to be identified in the parts book (pdf) and then put into an on-line parts finder (I use Ducati of Omaha) to see if they are available and the price. Usually, I check with the dealer first and then use secondary sources for the NLA items. Granted, some of the dealer pricing is a little steep, but not always. I like to get all the little parts that are worn out or broken. All the hardware goes through my ultrasonic cleaner.

I'm waiting to get my heads back from the machine shop that is doing the cleaning/blasting so I can do the valve job and reassemble the heads.
 

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The dash panel on my Supersport was loose to the touch. I tried to remove it, but only one mount was still attached to the frame. The other two had broken off. While trying to loosen the nut on the last remaining mount, the plastic just snapped. I guess after 20 years in a hot dry climate, plastic tends to get brittle and break.

The gauges needed to be restored as the indicator needles were almost white from fading (originally bright orange) and the dash surround was distorted from shrinkage. I removed the gauges and delivered them to my local speedo guy for repair and restoration.

I checked with my local Duc dealer on the dash and he said NLA. He did check other dealers in the USA and steered me to one that had a new one on the shelf. I was lucky to snag it.

Next, I spent some time cleaning the cases up. This is a thankless task until you step back and see how nice they look when done. I thought about refinishing them, but the original patina seemed more natural as they just weren't that bad.

Ordering the parts is a time consuming endeavor. The part numbers have to be identified in the parts book (pdf) and then put into an on-line parts finder (I use Ducati of Omaha) to see if they are available and the price. Usually, I check with the dealer first and then use secondary sources for the NLA items. Granted, some of the dealer pricing is a little steep, but not always. I like to get all the little parts that are worn out or broken. All the hardware goes through my ultrasonic cleaner.

I'm waiting to get my heads back from the machine shop that is doing the cleaning/blasting so I can do the valve job and reassemble the heads.
I had the same problem with my dash. I'd broken one mount years ago when I dropped it, and had glued it back - which was OK. Then I tried to remove the unit - and the other mount broke (disintegrated), when I tried to undo the nut. I got a dash out of Aus... And used a liberal application of copper anti seize on the threads when I mounted it all back up. At least all my gauges were OK.

One thing worth doing - replace as many of the dim glow-worm warning lights with LED's as possible - which means all but the fuel level warning. Do a search on 'Dim dash lights' in this forum, and you'll see my posts as to what I got to work - with links to the vendor website. You can get LED bulbs that are a direct plug in replacement for the mini-wedge bulbs, and then you'll be able to see things like indicators are on - or headlight on/off/high in the daylight. The only wiring mod is to the indicator bulb on the dash - a couple of diodes need to be fitted to let it work properly. Either buy them yourself, or the same place that sells the LED's has them. The only downside, is that the headlight warning bulbs (green and blue) can be a bit bright. I 'fixed' mine for now with a small strip of tape over the middle of the light on the dash. Sometime, I'll try and track down some lower lumen ones for those two.
 

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There is a place in heaven for those who save a Supersport.
Then I wonder where some of us will go who made a career out of changing them, is hot rodding /modifying saving or creating zombie bikes ...lol
Are we better do have clapped out beat donor bikes left for parts or restoration or nice but not going back to stock bikes. Walt Siegl has sent a few to such a place and I fear there may be a ducati chopper or ATV out there somewhere.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Then I wonder where some of us will go who made a career out of changing them, is hot rodding /modifying saving or creating zombie bikes ...lol
Are we better do have clapped out beat donor bikes left for parts or restoration or nice but not going back to stock bikes. Walt Siegl has sent a few to such a place and I fear there may be a ducati chopper or ATV out there somewhere.
There is plenty of room in Duc-heaven for both. Though at this point in history, there are a lot fewer restored to original bikes out there.
 

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its funny how 10 years ago these bikes were just ehh.
I have always loved the old carbie ducks and I have drooled over quite a few modified to WTF is that versions of them.

I think as long as these stay on the road in one form or another its a win.

keep doing you ducvet you have the ducati gods behind you :)

And for the people restoring to Original, hats off to you. It's much harder to go oem than modded as I am sure we all know
 

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Discussion Starter #34
It's much harder to go oem

its funny how 10 years ago these bikes were just ehh.
I have always loved the old carbie ducks and I have drooled over quite a few modified to WTF is that versions of them.

I think as long as these stay on the road in one form or another its a win.

And for the people restoring to Original, hats off to you. It's much harder to go oem than modded as I am sure we all know
I have done both and making a bike like it was when new is more difficult due to the dwindling supply of new parts.

Based on my car-life experience, values on original/restored bikes will tend to go up over time compared to modified ones. If you doubt this just look at the values of the bevel-drive bikes; originality helps those values.

Now, I'm not saying that a bevel-drive bike is directly equivalent to a 900SS belt-drive (I can hear the screams as I write this), but the market process is the same. As the bikes get older, then originality is more highly valued than not.

I feel that I am a bit ahead of the curve here (story of my life).
But, mark my words, it will happen.
This will happen first to the higher spec 900SS models (SP, SL).

Don't believe me (?), try to buy a first year Superlight.

Notice that I am only talking about value here, not riding enjoyment, personal satisfaction, etc.
I do get it about modifying, it is just not what is happening here.
 

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I have done both and making a bike like it was when new is more difficult due to the dwindling supply of new parts.

Based on my car-life experience, values on original/restored bikes will tend to go up over time compared to modified ones. If you doubt this just look at the values of the bevel-drive bikes; originality helps those values.

Now, I'm not saying that a bevel-drive bike is directly equivalent to a 900SS belt-drive (I can hear the screams as I write this), but the market process is the same. As the bikes get older, then originality is more highly valued than not.

I feel that I am a bit ahead of the curve here (story of my life).
But, mark my words, it will happen.
This will happen first to the higher spec 900SS models (SP, SL).

Don't believe me (?), try to buy a first year Superlight.

Notice that I am only talking about value here, not riding enjoyment, personal satisfaction, etc.
I do get it about modifying, it is just not what is happening here.
I completely agree. I am in the vintage racing and car world and the more period or original the car the more the value.
I am also agree that the 900's are going to see a jump in price over the next 10 years if not sooner.....there are going to be more and more retired people or later in life adults that remember their dad having a 900 and wanting one themselves.....Happens all the time in vintage cars/race cars
 

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Discussion Starter #36
I completely agree. I am in the vintage racing and car world and the more period or original the car the more the value.
I am also agree that the 900's are going to see a jump in price over the next 10 years if not sooner.....there are going to be more and more retired people or later in life adults that remember their dad having a 900 and wanting one themselves.....Happens all the time in vintage cars/race cars
I agree.

Here is an ad from my local CL today.
https://orangecounty.craigslist.org/mcy/6149293432.html
Some would say this is strong money for a 900SS-SP, but I think this is where the market is going.

Low miles, original specs and clean condition will be the value leaders.
 

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But, mark my words, it will happen.
This will happen first to the higher spec 900SS models (SP, SL).

Don't believe me (?), try to buy a first year Superlight.

Low miles, original specs and clean condition will be the value leaders.
There is a very original 900SL listed on Bay Area CL right now, proving your theory is sound:

https://sfbay.craigslist.org/pen/mcy/6139469697.html
 

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Discussion Starter #38
Instrument cluster/dash

The instruments are back from the speedo shop and look like new. I put them in the old dash and was looking forward to seeing them in the new dash. Luckily, the shipment came in late today so I could mount them up.

All the bulbs were replaced with new stock bulbs. I appreciate the advantage of the LED type bulbs, but this is an exercise in retro.

The steering head bearings originally felt notchy so I decided to replace them with a previously ordered steering head bearing set from All Balls. When I disassembled the triples, the top bearing didn't look too hot (see photo).

The procedure is pretty straight forward to those who have been around bikes for a while so I won't go into the details. Suffice it to say, the action is much smoother with new bearings.

It is my experience that steering head bearings need servicing occasionally. When you have a lot of torque, it is easy to wheelie which is very hard on the bearings causing small indentations that can lead to the notchy feeling.
 

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Your fourth picture "20170424_175320.jpg"
What's going on under the frame sticker?
Coming off the end of the weld on the left hand side.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
Your fourth picture "20170424_175320.jpg"
What's going on under the frame sticker?
Coming off the end of the weld on the left hand side.
Thanks for the heads-up, I will check it out.
 
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