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Hi

I‘m thinking about buying an 94 SS which has been stored in a dry and heated office for the last 13 years.
What did you guys think has to been done and replaced? belts, oils, tires...?

Tank is empty so i dont expect any rust inside.

Thanks
Chris
 

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Belts and tires for sure. Also change brake fluid and oil of course. Also brake hoses if they are rubber.

It'll probably develop some leaks during the first few runs so expect to change all the rubber in the carbs (rebuild kit), fuel hoses, maybe the intake manifold rubber boots if they are showing signs of cracking, possibly fork seals and brake caliper seals.
 

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Expect to do a full major service, belts plugs fluids, tires, maybe chain & sprockets depending on what those look like. clean the tank if needed, replace the fuel pump, filter & all fuel lines-if needed, disassemble, clean & rebuild the carbs. Replace all brake hoses if rubber with stainless lines--look at the calipers & master cylinders make sure they are working properly & not leaking--- thats where to start--I just did this to the bike I picked up it had not been started in 18 years--after you do these items then see what else is needed
 

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Hi

I‘m thinking about buying an 94 SS which has been stored in a dry and heated office for the last 13 years.
What did you guys think has to been done and replaced? belts, oils, tires...?

Tank is empty so i dont expect any rust inside.

Thanks
Chris

You can probably guarantee a rusty tank, my 2000 SS was nice and shiney through the filler cap, but once i turned it upside down the rust was all up the top where it could not be seen.
Good luck.
 

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I would change ...
Belts
oil/filter
brake clutch fluids
rubber brake lines
battery

At that point I would fire it up and i would expect a leak or two from carb o-rings/seals. You do not always get them so if you start it and it is dry you are good to go. If on the other hand see if it holds long enough to check jetting. If you plan on jetting anyway then go on in and freshen away, avoid aftermarket kits best with oem. Jet kits from dynojet or factory are good.

I always expect to find issues on trophy bikes from lack of use but the way you find the issues is by running it once the bike is safe to run.
 

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i've done a few of these kind of jobs this year. i would say, if you have a amount in mind you think you will (hope to) spend, triple it and add 10%.

you might get lucky, might not. only way to find out is start spending. at some point you'll stop.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Brake-lines are already stainless, That‘s gonna save me a small amount ;)
Honestly i thought the same procedure as ducvet wrote: change the major things, start it or even ride it and wait wher it‘s going to leak.
 

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i've done a few of these kind of jobs this year. i would say, if you have a amount in mind you think you will (hope to) spend, triple it and add 10%.
Take your credit card to the dealer and just give it to them.
 

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Leaving motorbikes standing is the worst way you can mistreat them, i'd be looking for another bike.

The time left standing is one thing but what condition was it in when it was decided to park it? why was it parked?
It will definitely need all new fluids, tyres, belts, the carbs will need an overhaul, so will the forks and likely the brakes (no kits for the master cylinders so there's some cash there.... The fuel pump will be toast.

What was worn out or almost worn out? chain, sprockets, steering head bearings, brake pads, rotors etc.
The engine will likely be fine and fire up with fuel in it but 13 years is an age, seals and gaskets don't like being dry that long, rot will have set in and you will likely have to disassemble something significant and repair it to make it safe and rideable.
You could do the basic stuff and ride it and see how it goes but if it breaks down repeatedly leaving you stranded it's a hassle, the money you spend recovering it could have gone into preventative replacement of parts, i'd hate to discover the brake master cylinder or caliper seals have failed while on the road.....

If you like tinkering, that's cool, i love it, but buying a headache/money pit gets old fast and for what that would end up costing you you could buy a newer, faster better maintained bike for much less and actually enjoy riding rather than being stuck in the garage tearing your hair out......
 

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if you can do your own work then that will save a lot of $$, I earlier this bought my 91 900SS, I paid $ 1550.00 for it (yea I got a deal) it had been sitting for 18 years. I am a dealer so I got my new parts a bit cheaper then you can. I did a full major service with belts, rebuilt the carbs w/ Factory Pro jet kit,, new tyres, cleaned & coated the tank, new fuel pump lines & filter, new speedo, new left combo switch (it was broken), new tail light lens (it was cracked), new stainless brake & clutch lines,--Then I bought a few things I wanted to do-most nice used-carbon tech high slip on's, mounts for the pipes, frame brace, c/f front & rear fenders, solo seat pan w/ corbin saddle,original style fairing support, --Now the bike runs and rides perfectly. I am now into it for $ 3200.00 so I think I did ok. only other things I am thinking about doing are race tech fork springs & maybe an Ohlins rear shock but only if I find a deal on the shock. So it can be done without breaking the bank as long as you can wait to find a deal on any used bits you need.--Now if I had not done the the extra things that I just wanted to do (but were not needed) I would have been into this bike for around $ 2300.00.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Bike has been stored because the owner had three other bikes at the time and already knowed, back in 2006 that it would raise in worth in the future. In fact it‘s a yellow Superlight 3. i wrote SS in the title because the Superlight is an Euro spec.

It has been correctly prepared for the storage. The owner is real up to date in motorcycles.

Tank has already been replaces before it has been stored due to rust.

I‘m sure this will not ride at the first push of the button but this one is really clean, no accident, no scratch on the fairings...and even a daily driven bike can turn into a moneypit depending who was the previous owner ;)
 

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If it’s a Superlight keep it stock. Never do anything to it you can’t reverse. Keep all the stock parts . Value of that bike is going up. It’s well worth putting money into it, you won’t lose it.
 

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If it's a Super Light then leave it stock thats where the value is, they are rare enough to leave alone
 

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I agree with all the above. I recently bought a 2001 750 SS. I have stripped all the plastic off, pulled the fuel tank, replaced the oil. It had been down, so the plastic is trashed, but I don't want it on anyway. It is a $500 bike. I won't put a lot of money into it, just want to keep it running as a 4th play toy. I am having a competent mechanic clean out the fuel tank and pull a dent out of it. It will basically be a rat bike. I will paint the tank, find some inexpensive turn signals for the front...they are MIA...a decent, but not too pricey headlight, and call it good. It was licensed and being ridden as recently as October of this year, and I bought it this month. Previous owner has 2 bikes, and the SS hurts his neck...auto accident residue. That's my story and we all need to stick to it.
 

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I got lucky when I found my yellow 97 900ss with only 12000 miles last June. It had been parked 12 years ago with a fried clutch.Luckily it was in dry storage for that hibernation.The tank turned out to be rust free ,but needed a new fuel pump and all new rubber lines in the fuel system,The carburetors were so gummed up it took 3 cleanings to get right.I replaced the tires as they were dry rotted,New clutch,O-ring chain ,clutch and brake cylinders needed cleaning also.The bike starts and runs beautifully I've rode it 3000 miles before the weather put an end to my riding season this year, I like the bike allot better then I expected I would.I bought it for only $900.00 and its never been down,so I made out like a fat cat.
 

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If you have not done so replace the belts NOW before something bad happens
 
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