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Discussion Starter #102
Moving on up to the FCR carbs. I decided on buying a set of Split 41mm carbs with one horizontal configuration and one downdraft configuration.

Now I know everyone says buy them from Chris at CA Cycleworks, but I have to say I have not had very good luck with him. I am sure he is a very busy guy and I can tell he has had great advice for many of the members here, but every time I have tried to talk to him (2x to him and one to his helper lady) he does a great job of telling me that my project is a waste of money and it will be nothing but trouble. Basically, if I want more power I should just buy another bike. Hmm, well sorry to say I have not been able to get him to take any of my money ever. So I am sure his concerns are valid for many, I just get the feeling he discounts everyone ability to be successful at doing nothing more than bolting on a pre-configured set of banked carbs. I do appreciate his honesty and integrity for just not selling people product he knows may be trouble, so I am sure he is a great vendor, just not for me. So... I do want to thank Guy Martin at MBP Ducati and Chad at Sudco along with Brad Black for all of the help and wisdom they so freely offer up. I ended buying them directly from Sudco with jetting configurations suggested by Guy. I got a little confused along the way and Brad was quick to reply back to a PM of mine with advice. Such good people on this community.

I am going to completely re-wire the system to allow for the Ignitch with TPS, a relay for direct power to the coils and Ignitech along with a new Mofset type regulator.

Starting with the TPS for the FCR carbs. There is a guy who has made a bolt on kit for the KTM bikes, but he was never able to get it back in production for me to simply buy this from him. I needed to design my own.

I dissembled the downdraft carb removing the shaft. I then purchased a precision 8mm stainless steel dowel pin from Mcmaster car, and machined a key on to it. I then determined the correct length I needed to extend the throttle shaft and welded it on to the existing shaft.

I then bought a TPS from a Yamaha 450 dirt bike and designed a mounting bracket in CAD. I have a 3d printer at work that I can use for anything I want, so I ended up printing many of the parts for this project out on it. The TPS mount being one of them.

Here is a picture of the TPS mount in CAD



The 3d printer we have is made by a company called a Stratasis and the model is the Fortus 250mc with an a envelope of 10x10x12

About Fortus 250mc Product 3D Manufacturing Machine | Stratasys

Basically you hit print and a few hours later you take your part out of the machine. It is made from ABS plastic and works well for low strength objects.

This is what the machine looks like



This is the finished printed part bolted to the carb and the TPS sensor mounted



And a shot of the sensor



For any of you interested in the 3d CAD files I designed to build all of my custom parts. I made them available for viwing in 3D or for download if you want to use them on your own projects (STEP format). Please be cool and don't take the designs and make them for sale to others without asking my permission first. I am not here for profit but to help other get their projects going. Thanks for respecting this.

The website is called GrabCad and you may have to register to see them or download them. Here is a link to my project with all of my parts. Some we have not discussed yet, but will get to soon.

https://grabcad.com/library/ducati-900ss-parts-1
 

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Admirable work, specially on the heads.
Any chance of some before/after flow graphs ?

Given the meticulous way you approach each part of the build, I'm sure you'll have the Keihins working just right.
One thing you might want to check is, the pilot air jet needles ( a great aid to tuning the idle) are seated, when wound all in, on their seats and not on their springs binding.
I've had a hard time getting the idle AFR right, with the coils of too long springs controlling the air flow to the pilot system .
 

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Hi,

pretty cool deal with the 3d printer and CAD files. I have a 3d printer I built my self (my own design). I can knock things out in a 0.2mm layer hight with a build volume from 245x318mm. Pretty cool stuff but you will run into usuability problems with some objects. I am using PLA which is quite strong but not stable over 140°. Shapeways will print your file in a bronze-Stainless steel hybrid that would be better suited for some applications. For a TPS sensor I think the ABS will be fine though.

I will be using my 3d printer to make parts for the tail light and blinker brackets.

Cool stuff and thanks for sharing the CAD files.

Gray:think:
 

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For any of you interested in the 3d CAD files I designed to build all of my custom parts. I made them available for viwing in 3D or for download if you want to use them on your own projects (STEP format). Please be cool and don't take the designs and make them for sale to others without asking my permission first. I am not here for profit but to help other get their projects going. Thanks for respecting this.

The website is called GrabCad and you may have to register to see them or download them. Here is a link to my project with all of my parts. Some we have not discussed yet, but will get to soon.

https://grabcad.com/library/ducati-900ss-parts-1
I respect your concerns with regards to the use of your intellectual property. Have you considered self declaring copyright under the Creative Commons licensing system? https://creativecommons.org/licenses/

It gives you options on who can use your works, how they may share them, and if they are allowed to use them for commercial gain. In this instance it seems like you would use the By-NC-ND for attribution of the original to you, for non commercial purposes and restricting their ability to make derivatives for commercial uses.
 

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Discussion Starter #108
Finally time to build the engine

Finally time to build the engine. Waiting for all the custom parts and machine work usually takes up most of the time.

Fitting the DS1000 71.5mm stoke crank to the 900 cases was not too bad. A little machine work and grinding was all that was needed.

Since the width of the counterweights is a little wider on the DS1000 crank it was necessary to do a little machine work on the side of one of the cases. The crank just nipped this area, but a grinder took care of that.



Next up is the problem of the longer stroke and the rod bolts. Just like on the DS1000 there needs to be clearance for the swing of the bolts at the bottom of the case, again a little grinding took care of this.



And another view



The biggest issue was due to the titanium rods and longer stroke. They would not clear the layshaft. So a little lathe work on the lay shaft to turn the OD down a few millimeters is what it took.

Not difficult to do



After a little clean up work and polishing



And thats it, all it took to make the crank fit.
 

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Discussion Starter #109
Now that everything fits, it is time to shim the crank and gearbox parts. I did not take pictures of this, but I did discuss this on my other build so you can check it out here http://www.ducati.ms/forums/77-sport-classic/80859-sport-classic-project-bike-32.html. Same idea no mater what engine your are building.

First thing is to find some thin shims like 1.9mm and install the crank and button up the cases. Using a dial indicator check the freeplay of the crank. Take the amount of freepay in mm and add .2mm for preload. Divide this by 2 and this is the size of the shim needed for each side. Now the DS motors us the crank to center the rods unlike the newer superbike cases that use the piston, so I like to check that the rod is centered in the case. If needed adjust the shim thickness left or right to center the rods always making sure to keep the same total thickness you calculated before. Often it is hard to get it perfect for both rods, so do the best average for both.

Next you need to shim the shifter drum. I like to stay on the big end of the tolerance and get close to .4mm but not less than .3mm.

Next up is the gearbox shafts. Again I use factory spec for both, but like to keep it on the tight end of the tolerance for these. When finished, check that the forks are centered with the gearbox and that the gears are centered on the shaft. Again you can swap out shims the recenter the gears if needed.

Some pics







Do yourself a favor and get some rubber bands or old o-rings and string them through the rods and over the head studs. This will keep the rods centered and from banging around on the cases when turning the motor over.

If the crank pre-load is correct, it should feel smooth and not rotate under its own weight. Too loose is not good, as angular contact bearings need pre-load to function properly



Yep, that's a full set of Nichols studs. At this point, why not

 

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Discussion Starter #111 (Edited)
Happy New Year Everyone. Here is a little recap of what I was up to this past year besides the FE project.

Had a great year with lots of new opportunities. It was a great summer for the track. Did a couple track days on my Sport Classic. This is my Daily bike but it runs and handles great.









I also had the opportunity to work the AMA Daytona Super Bike Series. I was asked by Kyle Wyman #33 to do Data, Telemetry, and Fuel Mapping for his R6 DSB bike. He ended up 6th in the Daytona 200 and I also got to go to Road America, Barber, Laguna Secca, and NJMP to do the same. Pretty cool being on the other side of the pit wall. Should be doing the same this summer for the new MotoAmerica series.

Here are some cool shots of Kyle on his R6. He also raced the XR 1200 class, check him out at https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=kyle+wyman







I'm thankful for my great year and the support of my wonderful family.

Here is to a great 2015 :D
 

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Happy New Year Everyone. Here is a little recap of what I was up to this past year besides the FE project.

Had a great year with lots of new opportunities. It was a great summer for the track. Did a couple track days on my Sport Classic. This is my Daily bike but it runs and handles great.





Here is to a great 2015 :D
Whoa - I like that a lot! :)

Are those conical mufflers your own work or where did you get them from - they look very nice on the SC?

Happy New Year.
 

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Discussion Starter #113
It's a standard Arrow full system, nice quality, nice sound. I sold the termi 2 into 1 because this was so much better
 

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Discussion Starter #114
Time to check the squish.

First thing is to install one snapring on the bench then fit the piston to the connecting rod and check the wrist pin fit. If all is good its time to gap the rings.



The Pistal Pistons from The Ducshop come with spec paper for the ring gap based on the piston diameter. Do the math to get the gap.

I fit the ring about 15mm down in the bore and square them up with a piston turned upside down. I use a feeler gauge to check the ring gap. If it is too small, which is always the case I take it out and use a hand crank ring file from Summit racing



When finished with the ring gaps I install the piston in the cylinder with a ring compressor I install the standard .4mm base shim and assemble both cylinders. I take some rosin-core solder about 5mm long and stick it to the top of the piston with some grease.



Then I install the head and torque it into place. Rotating the crank one time only to compress the solder against the quench pad on the head. Take it all apart and then with calipers measure the thickness of the solder. this thickness is your quench. Hopefully they will all be similar and then this tells you if you need to make a new base shim or not. I was shooting for the tight side of .95mm because of the bulky titanium rods being stiff and the RPMs of the 2v not being so high. In my case I needed a .3mm base shim. Since these dont exist I need to make them. I bought some stainless steel shim stock from Mcmaster Carr McMaster-Carr

Used some Dychem to scribe the shape of the old gasket on to the sheet of shim stock. I then use some Wiss snips to trim it close. I then use a carbide bur in the dremel tool to finish the shape. De-burr it and its good to go. Takes about 1hour to make each shim.



I then re-assemble it all with belts at running tension of 145Hz and use some clay in the valve pockets to check the piston to valve clearance.

 

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Discussion Starter #116 (Edited)
These Engines are not that heavy, or I was feeling tough this day. Time to put the engine back in. My daughter was laughing at me for making an ugly face when she took this picture



Put the engine back in with a set of Nichols Engine bolts, as with any of his parts, the quality is excellent. You have to drill out the threaded mount on the frame to use these, but it is simple to do. Nichols Sport Bikes | Products | 10mm Motor Mount Bolt Kit





Used a Nichols aluminum flywheel as well



For the clutch side I wanted a billet clutch hub to replace the stock die cast unit. This also eliminates the cush drive and is a bit lighter. I could not find one in the states so I ordered it direct form NGR Italy http://www.ngr-cnc.it/en/products/clutch/clutch-drum/clutch-drum.html



I am a big fan of the EVR product. I have a slipper on my sport classic but feel a carbureted street bike is fine without this expense. So I went with a 48t basket and organic friction plates topped off with the ant-clank clutch cover. Some noise is fine, but I don't like the clutch too loud. This is a good combination for great modulation and control.





 

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Discussion Starter #118 (Edited)
Now that the engine is in it is time to start figuring out where everything is going to go. Split FCR's require the removal of the airbox and most of the places for things like coils, battery, fuses, ect. This all need to be made to fit and bee better organized and clean.

First up is to fit the carbs and orientate the adjustable manifolds to get the carb float level correct.



My plan is to go with aftermarket Nology twin pole coils for the dual spark heads.

Swap the regulator out for a Mofset type.

Rewire everything with heavy gauge wire from the regulator as well as all new pure copper 6g wire for the battery and ground.

A new battery box is needed as well as attaching Big pod filters.

I next designed a new bracket for the regulator that would allow it to bolt to the stock mounting location on the frame, yet still fit in the frame and make room for the new wires.

Here is a 3d model of the bracket. Its up on my GrabCad link I posted a while ago if anyone wants to download it and use the design for their own project. For now I printed it out of plastic to test fit it.



The new Mofset regulator mounted



Since all the wiring would be new I needed to find a location for the main 30a fuse. I made a simple rubber grommet mounted steel strap that attached to the factory mounting tabs for the stock airbox. I also used this strap to mount the horizontal coil.



Next was to design the battery box. I have no intention of cutting or welding on this frame, so everything must mount to stock locations. For the battery box I chose the front right corner of the frame. This would be out of the way of the carbs and filters. Once again I designed the part in Solidworks (also on GrabCad)

Here is the Cad Model



This printed plastic box also mounts to the original airbox tab, but has two places that nest up against the frame and are held on with zip ties. Sounds kinda cheezy, but it came out very clean. I used a rubber strap from the battery box of my Sport Classic to hold the battery into the box.

Here is a pic of the "small battery" box more on this later.



Next I used the remaining air box tabs in the rear to mount the Vertical coil. Again this would put the plug wires in a great direction to use short direct wires. I made this out of steel and again rubber mounted it.




Since there can be a large voltage drop to the coils and Ignition control box because of their route through the switch I wanted to add a 20a relay to power everything. I mounted this on top of the other airbox tab along with the starter solenoid. This was the stock bracket flipped and eventually powder coated black to match the other fabricated brackets

 
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