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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
1993 750ss Ducati Lever Info Needed Please!

I am wanting to upgrade my brake and clutch levers while Im doing the right brake disc/caliper conversion.

I would like to get rid of the entire stock clutch and brake lever assemblies and add modern 'cup' style reservoirs.

Im looking at CRG RC2 levers so far. I like this modern style in a 'long' lever.

1.Can I combine these CRG levers with older OEM piston and cylinder style reservoir parts, or which new parts?

2.Is there a capacity number for the pistons that I need to know about?

3.Is my bike 7/8ths, 22mm Universal bar mount size?

4.Which newer OEM braided clutch and brake lines can I use?

Any tips, other lever brands or suggestions is much appreciated!

This my first Ducati and I love it! Ive owned 9 Japanese bikes.

Thanks!
 

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1. If CRG says it fits, then it fits.
2. Not really. Buy a Haynes manual, download the factory manual for specs.
3. Don’t your bars clamp on the fork legs ? Yes 7/8 for grips.
4. Why would you want to go OEM ? Many quality aftermarket lines out there.

A couple of suggestions for you : Fill out your info so we know where you are and what you ride. Use the “ search “ feature to look for old posts on questions you have. These are old bikes and you’ll find most of your questions have already been answered in detail before.
 
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If you are changing to a dual disc setup then you buy a master for a dual disc setup. Are you buying used or new?
Levers will depend on the masters you chose, if you use late injected supersport masters they use a different lever than say a period correct goldline brembo from a 916. Both are remote reservoirs and both would work with a dual disc system but they use different levers.

Not my bike but it looks pretty original,I would try and keep the mods to period correct mods vs fully modernizing the bike. If you keep the old parts you can always put them back but there are not many carby 750ss in great shape, I can not remember the last one I saw for sale. That is north eastern USA mind you some areas of the world did see more of them and they may not be rare.

You will want to buy aftermarket braided lines so you have new lines of the right length, It was common for 2 separate lines on a dual carby SS setup. Galfer, Spiegler both make good lines and you can even pick colors if you want black lines.

CRG as mentioned is quality but many gold lines had adjustable s so you might wait to see what your new oem adjusts to. Pazzo (SP) and braking are also fine but I would avoid "cheap" levers you find on ebay/amazon because many of the knockoffs out of china may look good but they are often made incorrectly and cause problems in many cases. Use cheap brake levers if you also plan to use cheap Chinese tires and brake pads, safety first
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
1. If CRG says it fits, then it fits.
2. Not really. Buy a Haynes manual, download the factory manual for specs.
3. Don’t your bars clamp on the fork legs ? Yes 7/8 for grips.
4. Why would you want to go OEM ? Many quality aftermarket lines out there.


Ok thanks! I updated my info.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If you are changing to a dual disc setup then you buy a master for a dual disc setup. Are you buying used or new?
Levers will depend on the masters you chose, if you use late injected supersport masters they use a different lever than say a period correct goldline brembo from a 916. Both are remote reservoirs and both would work with a dual disc system but they use different levers.

Not my bike but it looks pretty original,I would try and keep the mods to period correct mods vs fully modernizing the bike. If you keep the old parts you can always put them back but there are not many carby 750ss in great shape, I can not remember the last one I saw for sale. That is north eastern USA mind you some areas of the world did see more of them and they may not be rare.

You will want to buy aftermarket braided lines so you have new lines of the right length, It was common for 2 separate lines on a dual carby SS setup. Galfer, Spiegler both make good lines and you can even pick colors if you want black lines.

CRG as mentioned is quality but many gold lines had adjustable s so you might wait to see what your new oem adjusts to. Pazzo (SP) and braking are also fine but I would avoid "cheap" levers you find on ebay/amazon because many of the knockoffs out of china may look good but they are often made incorrectly and cause problems in many cases. Use cheap brake levers if you also plan to use cheap Chinese tires and brake pads, safety first
Thanks ducvet for the great info. I don't mind buying new. Yes I agree. It is 100% original from the first owner. Zero mods with all the elephant logos around it. I even found one behind the belts! I bought a second exhaust so It can always go back to the original factory pipes. Anything I do will be reversible back to OEM for sure. I found this bike at a local used car dealership. The owner of the dealership found it at an estate sale along with another Ducati Café that had 0 miles. The Café sold on ebay for $24,000.00.

I wont buy knock of Chinese levers. I am still confused as to whether or not CRG will work with 916 parts, or what modern non-OEM masters I can buy to use those levers. Ive read they wont work on Monsters.

I posted a bunch of pics on Ducati.org. I love this bike!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Here are those pics...
 

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Beautiful condition, great pics. Don't think those header pipes are Ducati and they look excellent!

I love the CRG levers, buy them for whatever brakes you put on. Some people have found putting dual brakes on the 750 not worth the extra expense, but for the right price, why not?

 

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If you look at the master cylinder pivot ... bolt. The early masters (and period correct) would be a hollow pivot you could fit a pencil through.These are available in both black and goldline and were oem on early 916,748 etc. later master cylinders will have a solid 6mm bolt as a pivot so it is easy to tell, these were used on later bikes 996 and on.

Great to keep the old parts, I would put that 2-1 exhaust on myself as a 2 into one ducati sounds great!

My 750ss trackbike makes due with one front rotor as well but I get that for some it is all about having more. Think of it this way adding 1 rotor,caliper mounting bolts and additional hose will add about 6lbs to your front end, most of that unsprung weight which negatively effects handling. If you upgrade the single line,brake pads (sintered Dp race or sport) and possibly rotor to a patent metal superbike rotor you might find you have enough brake without the added weight. For street use a Iron rotor would be even better but will show surface rust where the rotor does not ride.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If you look at the master cylinder pivot ... bolt. The early masters (and period correct) would be a hollow pivot you could fit a pencil through.These are available in both black and goldline and were oem on early 916,748 etc. later master cylinders will have a solid 6mm bolt as a pivot so it is easy to tell, these were used on later bikes 996 and on.

Great to keep the old parts, I would put that 2-1 exhaust on myself as a 2 into one ducati sounds great!

My 750ss trackbike makes due with one front rotor as well but I get that for some it is all about having more. Think of it this way adding 1 rotor,caliper mounting bolts and additional hose will add about 6lbs to your front end, most of that unsprung weight which negatively effects handling. If you upgrade the single line,brake pads (sintered Dp race or sport) and possibly rotor to a patent metal superbike rotor you might find you have enough brake without the added weight. For street use a Iron rotor would be even better but will show surface rust where the rotor does not ride.
Thanks again this is all great info. Ill think about it before I purchase too much. My race buddy suggested that same thing, and he suggested I join this forum! That was the best thing I could have done. I never bothered to research any of my Japanese bikes as extensively as this one. Its addictive for sure learning about Ducati's race history.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Beautiful condition, great pics. Don't think those header pipes are Ducati and they look excellent!

I love the CRG levers, buy them for whatever brakes you put on. Some people have found putting dual brakes on the 750 not worth the extra expense, but for the right price, why not?

Thanks for making me really happy about buying it. I wasn't even looking at bikes. I bought my last car from the dealership I bought the 750ss from. I was looking for a sportier car...oh well. As soon as I saw it on the site I knew it was going to be mine. I bought it on a handshake during a Jan snowstorm.

I believe you guys on here and you could be correct. My mechanic bought a Ducati exhaust on ebay and cut it up changing the headers...I think? It looked like OEM parts to me before he did it. I took a chance and he did a great job. It didn't need any jetting either...which was a shocker. It sounds and runs great.

I really like the look of your levers. Do you have any pics of the center console showing your reservoirs?

What brand or OEM models are your masters and reservoirs?
 

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They are just the stock masters that were on the 95 900SS/SP, they are the remote reservoir type. However, the CRG PN is identical to the "coffin" type that you have. Have you looked at CRG's website? They only have (for Ducati) about 3 different types ever - the difference is in the triangular bit that mates to the pivot as described upthread, there are only two types in the 90's and you tell them apart as Ducvet stated. I think you should have the hollow pivot that has a hole big enough for a pencil, but looking over your pic's I can see someone has been at work upgrading - so, it's possible you have something different.

The fitting of the carbon fiber front screen is still under construction, I'm far more concerned with getting the laser jammer from Escort sorted out at the moment to tie down the reservoirs, but I will post a pic when I am happy with the result. There is very little space to work with in the cockpit and I want to get it right. You may not be able to see it, but I am missing about 6lbs of electrical do-jiggery behind the clocks, and all of the iron fairing mounting/mirror supports/headlight constructions. The wires, fusebox, relays are all under the tail now. Still have to wire up the remote start bit and I can drop the key switch from its temporary location (do you see the key? That fork lock is an unnecessary two pounds that will have to go!) The clocks are moved back and up 4 inches and the surround is a custom 3D printed one.

In any case, I've seen the Chi$^#$ crap, CRG imho, is one of the best but my friends insist on an Italian named brand beginning with a "P". I just bought these from another member after looking for a while and they are the bomb - first class all the way and the current models even have folding ends so they cannot break off in a crash.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
They are just the stock masters that were on the 95 900SS/SP, they are the remote reservoir type. However, the CRG PN is identical to the "coffin" type that you have. Have you looked at CRG's website? They only have (for Ducati) about 3 different types ever - the difference is in the triangular bit that mates to the pivot as described upthread, there are only two types in the 90's and you tell them apart as Ducvet stated.

The fitting of the carbon fiber front screen is still under construction, I'm far more concerned with getting the laser jammer from Escort sorted out at the moment to tie down the reservoirs, but I will post a pic when I am happy with the result. There is very little space to work with in the cockpit and I want to get it right. You may not be able to see it, but I am missing about 6lbs of electrical do-jiggery behind the clocks, and all of the iron fairing mounting/headlight constructions. The wires, fusebox, relays are all under the tail now. Still have to wire up the remote start bit and I can drop the key switch from its temporary location (do you see the key? That fork lock is an unnecessary two pounds that will have to go!) The clocks are moved back and up 4 inches and the surround is a custom 3D printed one.
In any case, I've seen the Chi$^#$ crap, CRG imho, is one of the best but my friends insist on an Italian named brand beginning with a "P". I just bought these from another member after looking for a while and they are the bomb - first class all the way and the current models even have folding ends so they cannot break off in a crash.

I just found both owners and work manuals for my bike online. I do like the look of the CRG's. I will always keep all of the original parts if I do this mod. Would I be able to use the same masters you have on my '93 750ss?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
 

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Probably, but first decide if you have to have dual discs. Your other choices flow from that. I think you don't, as stated above, for the street the right pads and iron rotors are quick to warm up and powerful essentially regardless of what master cylinders you have. Stainless brake lines too have far more effect than the master cylinder and reservoir and I can see you have the stock rubber line now. I suggest you start there, and then investigate some new pads as yours may be a little old. As for the clutch, if you don't have an Oberon slave cylinder installed, get one (750's had that like the 900's, right?). In Arizona, it is never wet enough to rust, but oh - those iron rotors will in about 20 minutes at the edges when they get wet! Doesn't affect the braking, and the area the pads cover clean up after the first stop. Most relevant, dual discs add so much weight that the 750 kinda doesn't have the power to manage in very tight twisting turns. I've ridden in Missouri and Arkansas, you want quick and light, imho,... On the track if you've got two or more corners per lap bringing it down from 100mph, you gotta have duals... but that really shouldn't happen every 42 seconds on the street.

I saw the list of other bikes you have had, hmm,... they have been really quick bikes that are often ridden WOT, slam on the brakes and back to WOT again. I've had all of those and some others.

Might try the Ducati theory of carrying corner speed before you spend the money outside of a brake line and pads. From looking at your bike, someone who loved it made some nice upgrades and kept it sharp. Ducks are all about the torque leveraging traction while leaned over, not redline rpm's and pounding brakes - it's subtle, but in the right hands that 750 has won a lot of races against 600CBR's F2's back in the day! And I think the comparison to the F2 is very fair, in many ways they had a similar design goal in mind and are from the same era of motorcycle engineering thinking. The CBR1000RR was a whole 'nother thing, eventually I bored mine out to 1120cc and broke 200mph - never again, I'm too old.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Probably, but first decide if you have to have dual discs. Your other choices flow from that. I think you don't, as stated above, for the street the right pads and iron rotors are quick to warm up and powerful essentially regardless of what master cylinders you have. As for the clutch, if you don't have an Oberon slave cylinder installed, get one. In Arizona, it is never wet enough to rust, but oh - they will quickly at the edges! And dual discs add so much weight that the 750 kinda doesn't have the power to manage in very tight twisting turns. I've ridden in Missouri and Arkansas, you want quick and light, imho,...

I saw the list of other bikes you have had, hmm,... they have been really quick bikes that are often ridden WOT, slam on the brakes and back to WOT again. I've had all of those and some others.

Might try the Ducati theory of carrying corner speed before you spend the money. From looking at your bike, someone who loved it made some nice upgrades and kept it sharp. Ducks are all about the torque, not zipping rpm's and pounding brakes - it's subtle, but that 750 has won a lot of races against 600CBR's F2's back in the day! And I think the comparison to the F2 is very fair, in many ways they had a similar design goal in mind and are from the same era of motorcycle engineering thinking. The CBR1000RR was a whole 'nother thing, eventually I bored mine out to 1120cc and broke 200mph - never again, I'm too old.
Thanks again! The seat and custom 2-1 exhaust are my upgrades. This bike was 100% stock when I bought it and will always be reversible back to stock. I actually have the entire stock exhaust system, one more DND can and stock seat in my basement!

My fireblade was my favorite. It ripped my face off. I never was a WOT rider though. Im also too old (54) and my track buddies no longer ride. I just don't like the looks of a single disc. It reminds me of the F2 or an 80's bike. Also in my Ian Falloon books it says two rotors was an option from the factory for my bike...? You can tell by removing the cover plate on the right side, the holes are tapped and waiting for the disc.

Yes I am really enjoying this bike for the torque and your tips about carrying the speed is great. I don't miss the high whine of an inline four. I am really smiling at the powerful feel of this bike. Im not a fan of Harleys but I love V's and V4's.

I am just learning about the race history of Ducati. Even this 'consumer' model seems to show its race pedigree in its agility and solid build. I can tell it was hand made. The quality of the components seem better than my other bikes.
 

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I've put a few hot laps on friends 750's back in the 90's, with and without the second discs. At Phoenix Intl, the big straights got those brakes red hot.

When I look at any real vintage bikes, 1930-1970, with their terrifying drum brakes, I feel ok with one big disc brake,... it doesn't look so out of place anymore. And you know what? I think those single swingarm bikes look weird, they need another chunk of metal bolted on! (which is kinda what you are saying:wink2:)
 

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There are no slave upgrades (that I know of) for the early 750 motors as the slave is inside the right side cover.

The power on a 750ss carby will be in the 58-65rwhp range, at this power level the single rotor should have enough for the speeds you will see. When I added 10rwhp I needed the second disc because I got scared and was braking too hard into the corners :crying:. I started to destroy rotors at a rate that made it not feasible but a buddy who was expert had no issues with his rave bike with much more power and one rotor.

Play up the strengths of the bike with suspension upgrades and taking weight off where you can. Most of those bikes in the North eastern US were bought to be race bikes so they are hard to find in street trim such as yours. I have a couple frames from racers that I will be building up as they are now vintage legal and in the class should be a good choice. I have and have had "better" more powerful track bikes but for some strange reason I keep using the 750ss instead, there is just something right about the bike.

I would put the CRG levers at the top of the list of aftermarket levers and I too like the folders though it is due to non-crashing reasons. I find it nice when tying down or storing in tight spaces.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
There are no slave upgrades (that I know of) for the early 750 motors as the slave is inside the right side cover.

The power on a 750ss carby will be in the 58-65rwhp range, at this power level the single rotor should have enough for the speeds you will see. When I added 10rwhp I needed the second disc because I got scared and was braking too hard into the corners :crying:. I started to destroy rotors at a rate that made it not feasible but a buddy who was expert had no issues with his rave bike with much more power and one rotor.

Play up the strengths of the bike with suspension upgrades and taking weight off where you can. Most of those bikes in the North eastern US were bought to be race bikes so they are hard to find in street trim such as yours. I have a couple frames from racers that I will be building up as they are now vintage legal and in the class should be a good choice. I have and have had "better" more powerful track bikes but for some strange reason I keep using the 750ss instead, there is just something right about the bike.

I would put the CRG levers at the top of the list of aftermarket levers and I too like the folders though it is due to non-crashing reasons. I find it nice when tying down or storing in tight spaces.
Wow ducvet, I bought this bike knowing nothing about Ducati's. I am so happy to hear how much you like yours. I sort of got that vibe riding it, but Ive never ridden a track. Im pretty fast in the twisties, but Im an amateur for sure.

Im confused about the slave info? As long as I get OEM Brembo masters, one for dual brakes with either 10mm or 12mm pins (916, 900,750), I should be ok to use CRG levers that match that pin size and have remote reservoirs right?

Thanks again. You and only a couple others have really helped me out here (Im on two forums and no one answered me on the other forum)...and Ive made some friends along the way!
 

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Yes, its been a while since I saw the 750, its clutch is set up different from my 900's - the slave on 900's is on the left side, sorry about the confusion.
 

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Ive never ridden a track. Im pretty fast in the twisties, but Im an amateur for sure.
You are in trouble now as you no longer have an excuse to NOT ride a track, I instruct for a riding group and I am sure in your local track area there is a TRACK SCHOOL not to be confused with a RACE SCHOOL. You will find both but one is more about rules to race and the other is geared more towards teaching non-racers how to navigate corners. My playgrounds below.....

https://www.fishtailridingschool.com/

The difference is race schools often (not always) get mostly young and invincible kids out to show the world how fast they are, trackdays are more like skiers where you learn to carve turns without cars,animals and crazy people. It is a safer place to hone skills with no speed limits but a safety team on site. We have everything from young kids,new riders of all ages and even people in their 70-80's going faster than you might think , a older gray haired lady is a acrobatic flight instructor and schools youngsters on superbikes with little ninja 250 type bikes...lol. I have had students literally go under 50mph around the track (straightaway speed) and guys on vintage ,tourers or harleys surprise you how well they do. One of my favorite days is Cop day where we teach state police how to get around the track faster and drag less iron along the way. Those guys are great riders and it is fun to see them get faster/better/safer, now if we could just get them to dress more appropriately.

Yes if your CRG lever is the correct pin size then it should work. know that any replacement lever needs the bleed down checked as the adjusters are not set for your bike and could be detrimental if set wrong. in a nutshell make sure there is some free play and the fluid returns into the masters when you release. All you need to know about the slave is when someone mentions you buying an aftermarket slave it does not apply to your generation of engine if your clutch hydraulic line ends at the right side engine cover instead of the left side of the motor near the front sprocket.

Add to your to do list
Light flywheel
re-torque flywheel at a minimum.
lower gearing

We will hound you later to buy a set of FCR's :wink2:
 
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