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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just looking for a more educated opinion. I know it doesn't have all the power in the world, but was wondering if anyone here takes theirs to track days or not, and what I might need to do to it, mod wise, to make it better.

What category was the 750SS aimed to fit?

Thanks, sorry for all the not so important questions!
 

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I don't think the 750SS is aimed at any racing class...more like it is aimed at a certain public riding demographic. It is a lower cc, lower cost version that is supposed to appeal to smaller, less-experienced, and lower-budget riders. That certainly doesn't mean a bigger, experienced rich rider won't enjoy it, however! ;)

You can track day anything, and you can certainly track day your 750SS. You will want to put a sporty tire compound on, but other than proper riding gear you shouldn't need much else for an occassional track outing. More frequent outings may require more goodies.
 

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If and when I get the cash and free time, I certainly plan on taking mine to a trackday or two. I'm not going to race anyone anyways, but rather I want to push myself some and learn better skills as a rider. I don't think I'll be passing anyone with my 240 lbs on my '01 750:). I imagine I'll have a blast regardless.
 

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you'd be surprised what that little 750 can do. I've raced mine for a number of years and it still amazes me every time I crawl on it.
Done a bunch of mods over the years but it's a very competitive bike against some sv650's.
 

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I trackdayed a 750 monster no problem. Get some good tires and go. Focus on your form and don't worry. Have fun.
 

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It actually is aimed at a certain class, ultralightweight superbike (CCS). Its a great track bike and better for learning than most. Comparable to an SV.

I've seen a couple under 320 lbs and over 90hp.
 

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WERA you can race that thing in D Super Sport and Superbike and LW SBK, SS and Formula 2. You could be competative. would take a little work, but not so much. I think your better off in SBK classes with the ducs since you can get much more power. Stock SV's (2003 +)on race fuel power commander and exhaust are around 75HP
 

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I'm new to the Duc 750SS, having just bought mine, but I'm somewhat familiar with the "ultralight" classes of WERA, having run a stock EX500 and a supermono in D and Clubman classes.

If you are thinking of running a superstock legal 750SS with WERA, it will be more competitive in D Superstock and Clubman than the DSB and LWT classes that Sean mentions. It just takes way too much dollar investment to realize very many gains in hp with the 750SS. From what I have been able to gleen through lots of looking around for the past few months, only a few horsepower can be squeezed out of the 750 without very significant--and very costly--engine mods. The stock motor just doesn't like to "wake up" the way others do. You would be better off buying an 800SS than modding the 750SS.

The "good news" is that you can focus on spending your money on suspension rather than motor mods! A rear Penske will be around $800 and fork work can run from $300 for springs and valve emulators to $1500 for a Traxxion AK20 set up. You won't have to do anything to the brakes beyond buying pads.

In DSS, you will be beaten by racers on 800SSs who are your equal or better in ability. Last year, Sean demonstrated quite powerfully--to me, at least--that the 800SS really belongs in Lightweight Twins with the SVs, but right now, WERA has them in an even lighter class. The other competition in DSS will come from FZR400s. The Duc will make more horsepower and have much more torque than the fizzers. The brakes on the 750SS can also be an advantage. You'll give up a bit on weight and handling to the Yamaha unless you invest in the Duc's suspension. In the right hands, a 750SS is still pretty competitive in Clubman, where it was once considered a "cheater" bike (that is, a bike with a distinct advantage, like the 800SS in DSS and DSB :).

If you are considering racing, you should look at WERA, but also take a look at Fastrrax, which runs almost all of its events at Nelson Ledges in Ohio. Fasttrax also offers riders schools, track days, etc.

As far as a track day bike: You will probably be frustrated early on by those on 600s and 1000s who blow past you on the straights and then "park" in front of you at corner entries. After you are done whining a bit ;-), you will learn to time your passes so that you can pull the bigger bikes out of certain corners and then beat them into the next. In other words, you will learn how to be tactical in your riding, what is known as "race craft."

Have fun out there!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
sweet, I was hoping that there would some sort of class for me and my bike, thanks for all the great info guys!
 

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I'm new to the Duc 750SS, having just bought mine, but I'm somewhat familiar with the "ultralight" classes of WERA, having run a stock EX500 and a supermono in D and Clubman classes.

If you are thinking of running a superstock legal 750SS with WERA, it will be more competitive in D Superstock and Clubman than the DSB and LWT classes that Sean mentions. It just takes way too much dollar investment to realize very many gains in hp with the 750SS. From what I have been able to gleen through lots of looking around for the past few months, only a few horsepower can be squeezed out of the 750 without very significant--and very costly--engine mods. The stock motor just doesn't like to "wake up" the way others do. You would be better off buying an 800SS than modding the 750SS.

The "good news" is that you can focus on spending your money on suspension rather than motor mods! A rear Penske will be around $800 and fork work can run from $300 for springs and valve emulators to $1500 for a Traxxion AK20 set up. You won't have to do anything to the brakes beyond buying pads.

In DSS, you will be beaten by racers on 800SSs who are your equal or better in ability. Last year, Sean demonstrated quite powerfully--to me, at least--that the 800SS really belongs in Lightweight Twins with the SVs, but right now, WERA has them in an even lighter class. The other competition in DSS will come from FZR400s. The Duc will make more horsepower and have much more torque than the fizzers. The brakes on the 750SS can also be an advantage. You'll give up a bit on weight and handling to the Yamaha unless you invest in the Duc's suspension. In the right hands, a 750SS is still pretty competitive in Clubman, where it was once considered a "cheater" bike (that is, a bike with a distinct advantage, like the 800SS in DSS and DSB :).

If you are considering racing, you should look at WERA, but also take a look at Fastrrax, which runs almost all of its events at Nelson Ledges in Ohio. Fasttrax also offers riders schools, track days, etc.

As far as a track day bike: You will probably be frustrated early on by those on 600s and 1000s who blow past you on the straights and then "park" in front of you at corner entries. After you are done whining a bit ;-), you will learn to time your passes so that you can pull the bigger bikes out of certain corners and then beat them into the next. In other words, you will learn how to be tactical in your riding, what is known as "race craft."

Have fun out there!
whoa whoa whoa....I got a demonstration at Road Atlanta how powerfull a SV600 can be in DSBK..lol. Basically the seceret to any lightweight machine....as soon as you get it turned in you gotta nail the throttle virtually wide open asap, and stay on the gas. There is very little letting off the gas on a lightweight machine. And you also can brake pretty late..especially on an 800 with the braking system. The two 320mm rotors do the bike right in the braking department.
 

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I track day my 750ss its so much fun you loose a little on a straight but you can catch up going into corners i fitted pilot power 2ct's the are great i have spent nearly $1500 on suspension front and rear plus other odds and ends they corner great
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Now this is probably something I will have to find out for myself, but I was told that I will get better turn response with the 160 over the 180. I suppose its all person preference as long as it doesn't hit the chain.
 

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I run 120/170 on mine. Just follow what alot of the guys are saying here. Us guys that track ours can tell you, it'll make you a faster rider because you don't have a fast bike to overwhelm you. You will learn to brake later, turn faster and drive out harder.

If anyone tells you you can't get any HP without putting a ton of money in, that's pretty much with any bike. Sure the ports on a 750 were shit and the they were under valved, BUT that is an inexpensive fix. Just ask some of the guys here with them. My 750 is putting mid 80'sHP and weighs 387lbs wet, Ohlins rebuild forks($700) and a Penske shock(free, I just got lucky). With what I'm doing next, I plan to get into the mid to upper 90's HP. We'll see when it's done and dynoed.

On small tracks, I have embarassed liter bikes because they don't have the long straight to blow me away and I keep up with most 600's too; I know it's subjective though.

The key is to loose the fat(not on you ;) ) on the bike. get the weight down and work on the suspension. Worry about the motor later if you want to keep it(I'm guessing you will). I've had 5 Ducs and They've all come and gone but my 750SS will stay with me forever(yes I'm riding it into the afterlife, wherever that may be, but I'm guessing it'll be hot).

Oh BTW Sean, they are on the way. ;)
 

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I run 120/170 on mine. Just follow what alot of the guys are saying here. Us guys that track ours can tell you, it'll make you a faster rider because you don't have a fast bike to overwhelm you. You will learn to brake later, turn faster and drive out harder.

If anyone tells you you can't get any HP without putting a ton of money in, that's pretty much with any bike. Sure the ports on a 750 were shit and the they were under valved, BUT that is an inexpensive fix. Just ask some of the guys here with them. My 750 is putting mid 80'sHP and weighs 387lbs wet, Ohlins rebuild forks($700) and a Penske shock(free, I just got lucky). With what I'm doing next, I plan to get into the mid to upper 90's HP. We'll see when it's done and dynoed.

On small tracks, I have embarassed liter bikes because they don't have the long straight to blow me away and I keep up with most 600's too; I know it's subjective though.

The key is to loose the fat(not on you ;) ) on the bike. get the weight down and work on the suspension. Worry about the motor later if you want to keep it(I'm guessing you will). I've had 5 Ducs and They've all come and gone but my 750SS will stay with me forever(yes I'm riding it into the afterlife, wherever that may be, but I'm guessing it'll be hot).

Oh BTW Sean, they are on the way. ;)

I saw, thanks..got the USPS number today. Lets hope those things work good!!
 

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run a 180 rear. Dont go 160 on the 5.5 inch rim. I looked at it, didnt like it. The 180 grips better..more contact patch, plus takeoffs are more readily available
 

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whoa whoa whoa....I got a demonstration at Road Atlanta how powerfull a SV600 can be in DSBK..lol. Basically the seceret to any lightweight machine....as soon as you get it turned in you gotta nail the throttle virtually wide open asap, and stay on the gas. There is very little letting off the gas on a lightweight machine. And you also can brake pretty late..especially on an 800 with the braking system. The two 320mm rotors do the bike right in the braking department.
I have nothing but admiration for your racing ability, Sean, and your willingness to take on the challenges of running "bigger" bikes in the classes you run. Even when your bike was still superstock legal, you didn't run it in DSS, where it would have had any other DSS bike by 10 hp. I find that to be very sporting. I like DSB because it does bring together so many different bikes that have been built to run fast: the sleeved down SVs, the punched out Fizzers, hyper Hawks, the custom singles in TZ chassis, etc.

I'm learning to keep the throttle open, but I'm finding that it REALLY helps to have your suspension working right to accomplish that goal--and that's why I'll be spending a grand on suspension before I spend a grand on a pretty exhaust.
 
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