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Taking my GT in for 7500 service and new tire(s). I'm still on the stock tires! Rear is bald and front is not bad. I don't do track days or get crazy through the canyons, just casual riding with an occasional burst of speed here and there, but I would like tires that handle a little better and don't get caught up in the So Cal rain grooves (when does it rain here?). Any suggestions?
 

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A quick search here will show that there are many who like the Pilot Power 2CT. The Bridgestone 010 also gets some strong votes. Do a search and you'll get lots of info.

If you're looking for more mileage, the Pilot Roads or Metzeler Z6 may be your choice. They are also superior to the stock tires, although not as superior as the Pilot Powers.


By the way, your front tire is also worn out, even if it still looks "not bad" to you, and your rear tire was completely worn out WAY before it became bald. Your life depends on two very tiny contact patches between the road and your tires. Tires and brakes are the two most foolish places to try to save pennies on any vehicle, but ESPECIALLY on a motorcycle.
 

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By the way, your front tire is also worn out, even if it still looks "not bad" to you, and your rear tire was completely worn out WAY before it became bald. Your life depends on two very tiny contact patches between the road and your tires. Tires and brakes are the two most foolish places to try to save pennies on any vehicle, but ESPECIALLY on a motorcycle.
AMEN.

Which is why, even if you don't do canyons and track you should still get dual compound tires... yes they are slightly more money (like $20/$40 more), yes they wear out faster, but as Major states above: staying upright depends on your tire sticking onto the road.

So Michelin, Pirelli, Dunlop, Bridgstone, it's all up to taste. I'm partial to the pirellis (corsa IIIs)...

but get dual compound, it's just safer.
 

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Pirelli Corsa IIIs will transform your bike, and they do not follow rain grooves.
 

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Master of Bumnitude
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By the way, your front tire is also worn out, even if it still looks "not bad" to you.
Just wondering what the basis is for that statement. My rear deserved replacement at about 5K, my front is still good at just under 8K. Plenty of tread. Little cupping. Good profile. This, in my experience, is not unusual on a moderately ridden Duc.

-don
 

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Egra - I'm in the same boat and plan on getting the Michelin Pilot Road 2. About the same price as the Power 2, but designed for those of us who don't ride real aggressively. Reviewers say they're grippy and get good mileage.
 

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Having my 15K and a new front tire done within the week.
Been running Pirelli Stradas since tossing the stock Michelins. Great feel, 7500 or so good miles from the rear, almost 10,000 on the front. Mix of twisty, city and fwy. VERY stable on the fwy, particularly the stretches of the 138, 2 and 210, you know, those roads that all lead to Proitalia and the separation of one from one's $$$...:D
 

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Pirelli Diablos. These come stock on a new Paul Smart. I ended up with a set on my GT and have been impressed, far more so than with the Michelin Pilot Classics that came on the bike. The Pirellis seem to have better grip and seem to be lasting very well. Handling has been improved, as well. The tires do not track rain grooves.
 

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Just wondering what the basis is for that statement. My rear deserved replacement at about 5K, my front is still good at just under 8K. Plenty of tread. Little cupping. Good profile. This, in my experience, is not unusual on a moderately ridden Duc.
-don
I have never had such an experience, nor do I completely trust that you have, no insult intended.

With modern sport or sport-touring tires, I have never worn out a rear and still had a good front (my experiences were different with the hard touring tires of the 70's). I have had front tires that LOOKED pretty good after those miles, but when one actually measures the tread depth, one finds that there is little life left before the tread will hit the wear bars. More importantly, They are always much more worn on one side than the other (left in the U.S.) which has a negative effect on handling even if there was enough tread to consider using tire. It is illegal to run the tire past the point where it touches the wear bars, but a tire need not have actually hit the wear bars to be worn out when replacing the tire on the other end. Most manufacturers recommend replacement when the tread reaches 2mm. The wear bars are at 1.5. That's 2mm at the very most worn spot on the tire. When I wear out a front tire, there are places on the tire that are still near original tread depth.

So, that has been my experience with those tires on multiple makes of bikes. This is with pure street riding - track wear being somewhat different. Since we all ride differently, your experience may be different, but I'll bet if you measure your tread depth you'll find your fronts are more worn than you realize.
 

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I'm with Major. I don't take risks with my tires, especially not the front one. Just because more often than not i find myself in situations (tight turns) where I rely on having good and properly inflated tires. The consequences of not paying attention to these details can be way disproportioned compared to the price of tires.

not saying that you'll crash if you don't have newer sticky tires, but the further you get from these characteristics, the closer you get from loosing grip. Riding a sports bike successfully is about confidence and risk management. why take that risk over a relatively small amount of money?

just saying...
 

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I've always replaced both at the same time even though the front has usually looked good for at least a few thousand more. I guess this is from my experience with bicycles where cornering is dicey when riding a new rear tire with a moderately to well worn front one.

I think anytime you change tire brands or models, you definitely want to change both together to avoid any problems running two different compounds and tread design might cause.
 

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>They are always much more worn on one side than the other (left in the U.S.)

Please explain.. I don't doubt this, but I can't come up with a reason for why the tire would be worn more on one side than the other.
 

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>They are always much more worn on one side than the other (left in the U.S.)

Please explain.. I don't doubt this, but I can't come up with a reason for why the tire would be worn more on one side than the other.
Maybe if you ride mostly in the right-hand lane where the road slopes gently to the right for draining water, you're usually riding slightly left of perpendicular to the road? I tend to ride in the left-center of whichever lane I'm in which typically puts me just left of the high point of the lane. Therefore, I'd think mine would be more worn on the right side due to being kinda on the right side of the left track made by 4 wheel vehicles, and therefore maybe having more tire contact on the right. I'll have to check . . .

Or perhaps it depends on your politics - Democrats making more left turns, while Republicans make more right ones?;)
 

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"Crowned" is the word we're looking for.
 

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>They are always much more worn on one side than the other (left in the U.S.)
Please explain.. I don't doubt this, but I can't come up with a reason for why the tire would be worn more on one side than the other.
It is a well recognized phenomenon, but there is some speculation about the cause. The road crown that Cesare and Tsm refer to is one theory, but the area of wear doesn't seem to line up well with that theory.

Another popular theory is that, if you ride on the right hand side of the road, your left turns are always longer than your right turns. Thus you spend more time (and more distance) on the left side of your tires than on the right. Apparently some have done the math on this and the proportional difference is large enough that is really is a viable explanation. Certainly, on some divided 4-lane highways, where there is a large division between the two halves of the highway, the left hand turns can be 100's of yards longer than the right hand turns. The part of that theory that has always confounded me though is the fact that, while all left turns are longer, all right turns are sharper. Intuitively I would have guessed that it equaled out, but perhaps not.

Perhaps both things contribute.

Another theory I've seen mentioned is that right-handed people are more comfortable turning left, and so they corner faster through their left-hand turns than their right-hand turns. Most people being right-handed, most people wear the left side faster. What little anecdotal evidence I've seen contradicts this, that is, left-handers seem to have wear similar to right-handers in the same countries.
 

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interesting.. I'd pondered those possibilities and also wondered if maybe it had to do with the onramps.. but dismissed it because the tight ones are the right handers. This sounds odd, but I lived near a set of onramps in Philly that a group of sport bike riders used as a sort of track in the wee hours of the night. There was no traffic that late so they would go around and around the "circuit" of sharp curves and a "straight" of about 1/2 mile. lol.. it seemed like fun to me at first until I realized they were doing a NASCAR thing and only turning right.

kind of back on topic (sorry) .. Egra.. change both front and rear. Also, don't just go by mileage and tread depth. Tires don't age gracefully. If you're only riding 500 miles a year and have gone 6 years on the same set then you've only got 3,000 miles on them = lots of life in them.... .but 6 year old tires aren't as sticky as new ones by a long shot and imho just aren't safe. Read this.
 

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>They are always much more worn on one side than the other (left in the U.S.)

Please explain.. I don't doubt this,
There are two things that make wear uneven. 1) The road's crown. Roads are not paved to be flat, they are arched. This to aid water run off.

On a two-lane road the highest point is the centerline. Thus in lands where one rides on the right you are on a surface that is tilted down towards the right. Thus going straight your actual wear point is a bit on the left of the tire's center. Leaning into a turn puts you further towards the bead. This too effects wear pattern.

Reason 2 also effects the wear pattern, but differently. For those that ride on the right side of the road right turns are tighter.

Put these two together and you'll find that with miles the profile becomes egg shaped. That means the left and right turns require unequal lean and unequal pressure on the bar to initiate.

Generally this happens so slowly that most riders compensate and don't even notice it.

Changing the rear tire returns that one to the original profile. Having a different profile front and rear can exacerbate the problem. This may be noticed by either a sensitive rider or, according to legend, by a princess.

-don
 

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I have never had such an experience, nor do I completely trust that you have, no insult intended.
No offense taken. Suffice it to say that I have gotten more mileage out of my front tire than my rear on every bike and for every tire change since I began riding in 1967.

I rode a great deal more in the `90s - in part because I then lived a long way from the roads I favored. My 900SS got 7 or 8K from the rear wheel and from 9 to 11K from the front. This was with 'sport touring' tires such as the Michelin Macadam. (The original tires that came on the bike got, if I remember correctly, 5 and 7K)

The problem on the front was never lack of tread depth but cupping - that is the uneven wear of the tread blocks. - likely created by braking forces.

Interestingly these numbers did not seem to be affected by the track days I took - typically two a year. That just got the wear lines out where they belonged. :)

-don
 
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