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Discussion Starter #1
I wanted to get the 696 09 but the dealer has gave me an offer on a brand new S4R only USD 1000 more than the 696 so what do you guys think
 

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Need more info:

1. What year is that S4R?
2. Is the S4R new?
3. Is this your first bike? If not do you feel comfortable on a bigger displacement bike like the S4R?
 

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Ditto on all the questions above. The S4R (S4RS if it's a new one) is a heck of a gnarly first bike. The 696 will be a lot more user friendly and easier to ride and maintain, especially if it's your first bike. I have an '08 S4RS Tricolore and love it, but I wouldn't recommend it for a newbie. The lighter weight and smaller motor in the 696 make it more flickable and easy to toss around and probably make it a better bike for most people. The S4RS is seriously powerful and is more than most of us really need, but it is fun when you've got room to stretch the throttle cable.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes it brand new 08
and yes it is my first street bike to own, but i have driven bikes b4

Regards,
Saleh
 

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Interesting the OP asked most of the questions in his original post. He is talking about an S4R, which since it is new means the 998 engined machine that is identical to the S4Rs save for the carbon bits and Ohlins suspension.

Unfortunately when someone says they have 'driven' bikes before it makes me nervous. I would never recommend this machine for a new rider, the 696 would be perfect.
 

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I'm coming from a dual sport motorcycle myself. I average about 1,000 miles (1,600Km) a month in mixed riding. I have done some short trips on the Interstate but, most of my riding is not in heavy traffic.

As my experience has grown, I have found myself wanting to take longer trips and ride safer at highway speeds. My dual sport will run 70+ MPH (~120KPH) but the steering is so fast it really isn't safe for long distance runs unless I am totally focused on the steering.

If you have the self discipline to use a soft touch on the throttle, the S4R could be a motorcycle that would serve you well and be one you could grow into. 1L sportbikes are a handful if you let them get away from you.

The S4R has a much better center of gravity and is lighter weight then motorcycles I see a lot of first timers get. The low center of gravity with a reasonable seat height and narrow frame should make it a stable and forgiving motorcycle to build skills with IF you can stay off the throttle.
 

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Interesting the OP asked most of the questions in his original post. He is talking about an S4R, which since it is new means the 998 engined machine that is identical to the S4Rs save for the carbon bits and Ohlins suspension.

Unfortunately when someone says they have 'driven' bikes before it makes me nervous. I would never recommend this machine for a new rider, the 696 would be perfect.
The main difference I see is in the power of the S4R. The other basics seem to be pretty much the same - weight, seat height, etc.
 

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Don't do it. You'll either scare yourself shitless and sell it or you'll smash it to bits. For fucks sake get some real miles under your belt on a cheap dunger that you can afford to dent up a bit before you think of buying a high powered sports bike. On an earlier post you said you had experience on quads. Completely different skill set to be learned.
 

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I agree with all the replies, my S4RS is about my 17th bike to date and I have 27 years of riding experience. I could never imagine this being my first bike. You need to get some experience before you ride a bike like this. Ride the 696 for a year or two and then move up to a high performance bike.
 

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The S4R doesn't give you the margin of error a less powerful bike like the 696 would give you. I wouldn't touch it before you get a couple of years of riding under your belt. I know the extra power is tempting and we tend to think
that bigger is better. I'd rather learn on a bike I can outgrow eventually and ride the wheels of it before I move up to something that right now is beyond your skill level and either scares or hurts you.
 

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The main difference I see is in the power of the S4R. The other basics seem to be pretty much the same - weight, seat height, etc.
It is the power and torque that makes all the difference. My bike makes 132bhp at the wheel. It will powerstand over a crest while cranked over in 3rd gear. It is not a bike for a beginner. You will either hurt yourself and if you don't you will take a long time to become a good rider because the performance envelope will be so overwhelming it won't be easy to steadily improve your skills on a bike that you can master.

I'm an experienced rider and an ex road racer. Take the advice from someone who knows. You are suffering from unconscious incompetence. You don't know what you don't know. Don't find out I was right when you wrap yourself around a power pole. I apologize if I was unclear.
 

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, but i have driven bikes b4

Regards,
Saleh
the original poster is from Kuwait which will probably explain the use of the word "driven" as opposed to "ridden." i'm going to guess that English isn't his/her first language.
 

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the original poster is from Kuwait which will probably explain the use of the word "driven" as opposed to "ridden." i'm going to guess that English isn't his/her first language.

Nice catch oalvarez ;)...I believe that support goes a lot further than criticism when it comes to helping out a fellow rider no matter how inexperienced.
 

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It is the power and torque that makes all the difference. My bike makes 132bhp at the wheel. It will powerstand over a crest while cranked over in 3rd gear. It is not a bike for a beginner. You will either hurt yourself and if you don't you will take a long time to become a good rider because the performance envelope will be so overwhelming it won't be easy to steadily improve your skills on a bike that you can master.

I'm an experienced rider and an ex road racer. Take the advice from someone who knows. You are suffering from unconscious incompetence. You don't know what you don't know. Don't find out I was right when you wrap yourself around a power pole. I apologize if I was unclear.
You are suffering from unconscious incompetence. :rolleyes: Really? While I'm not an ex-road racer, I'm not a rank newbie either. About 18 months ago, I took the MSF course to brush up on my skills. Even this old dog can learn new tricks. At a 1,000 miles a month I may not be an "iron butt" marathon candidate but, I'm doing more then just puttering to my local waterhole to pose with the folks with thousands of dollars in aftermarket chrome.

If you are a rank amateur, I would strongly suggest a 250cc road bike. You have enough power to run reasonable road speeds and, they are light and "flickable".

If the original poster from Kuwait is totally new to motorcycles on the street, there is a strong argument for something smaller then a Monster. If they have some street experience and can avoid doing road racing and the urge to impress friends, an S4R is a reasonable choice IMHO. Other then power (which is controlled with the throttle), most of the other measures are very close to each other.

In terms of power stands and other dangerous things, the literature I read from Ducati says the stability is improved with a revised steering angle and longer rear swingarm. That, combined with the better riding position makes the S4R more attractive to me then an 848. I also like the water cooling and the poster from Kuwait might find water cooling to be better then air cooling depending on where they ride (dense traffic versus the open road for example).
 

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Check this out. Not everyone is an 18 year old testosterone filled kid that knows nothing but full throttle. One of my co-workers first bike was a CBR1100XX Blackbird, kept it for several months, then bought a Hayabusa. The kid, (21 years old), has a good head on his shoulders, is deathly afraid of both bikes, and keeps his right hand connected to his brain. Of course this is not a typical case, but cut the guy some slack, maybe he will treat the bike with the respect/caution it deserves. Another forum I belong to suggests everyone that is a fairly new rider should buy a Ninja 250. Besides, I look for used bikes that scared their owners shitless, and I buy them cheap.
 

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It sounds like the original post is from a relatively inexperienced street rider. Yes either bike would be fine if you just stay off the throttle but the S4R had the potential to get out of hand much quicker than the 696. I think to a new rider the S4R has the power to scare the sit out of them and this will limit their progression of learning to really ride the bike correctly. With the 696 a new rider will be able to use the full power band and learn how to smoothly accelerate out of corners and use the throttle correctly, not just on and off. Plus a lighter bike will be much easier to maneuver.

I am not the best rider out there by any means but I do have about 5 years riding experience. I have an 04 S4R with less power than the new generation bikes and do my best to use the full power ban but at times I even get surprised by the amount of power it has especially coming hard out of corners. To a new rider this could be get out of hand very quickly.
 

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Check this out. Not everyone is an 18 year old testosterone filled kid that knows nothing but full throttle. One of my co-workers first bike was a CBR1100XX Blackbird, kept it for several months, then bought a Hayabusa. The kid, (21 years old), has a good head on his shoulders, is deathly afraid of both bikes, and keeps his right hand connected to his brain. Of course this is not a typical case, but cut the guy some slack, maybe he will treat the bike with the respect/caution it deserves. Another forum I belong to suggests everyone that is a fairly new rider should buy a Ninja 250. Besides, I look for used bikes that scared their owners shitless, and I buy them cheap.
Valid point. I jumped on a 1000CC rice rocket with very little experience, and in the three years I rode it, managed not to wrap it around any trees. But, I never used anywhere near the full potential of the bike. I believe I would have become a better rider quicker by getting a smaller displacement bike that I could have pushed harder. But that's just me. Every case is a little different isn't it.

If money is an issue, keep in mind that though the S4R will only cost you 1k more now, the maintenance will cost quite a bit more as will the insurance. If money is not an issue, you can buy the 696 now, and when you get some experience, trade up to an S4R.

My $00.02.
 

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Get the S4R brother. Go for it! :cool: ONLY! AND I MEAN ONLY, if you have a good head on your shoulders. You want to keep it that way.

My very first bike ever, never ridin or started a bike------was a brand new 996-mono. I miss that bike. :(

Anyhow, much like anyone else on this board I had a lot to lose. I knew what could happen if I was not careful and respected the bike. I took it easy riding around and around on my block. Much like you the 996 was an offer I could not refuse.

My 2nd bike was an R1, then a 620 project bike. Now I ride a S4RS and
S2R1000. I'm still here and kicking. :cool: I say get it, but remember to know your limits.

If you ask me, the S2r1000 is harder to handle when it comes to the throttle response. I would sit someone on my RS, before I hand them the keys to the
S2R.

Good Luck and ride safe. :think: I love this icon.
 

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Its you life and your money so do as you please. That in mind I always suggest that a newer rider should look for something with a little less displacement and less weight that you can flog the shat out of because having more power at the twist of the wrist will not make you a better rider only faster on the straights.:D

You will learn to handle yourself and your machine better if you start with a smaller ride this is not just a random thought either. For proof just look at what motorcycle training courses start people on, (250's) look at where most racers come from (250's) you get the point. You can also look to many European countries that require you start your licensing on smaller displacement motorcycles and they have shown this system works with less of the severe collisions for a majority of their riders.

Bottom line is as I said its your money and your health so you can do as you please with both but the joy of motorycling is not directly related to HP. I have ridden many different motorcycles over the past 19 years and ride more miles than 90% of the folks out there. Currently I ride a 1300 cc and a 250 cc supermoto and that lil 250 is a kick and I believe it still is letting me gain skill and ability to this date. You can't hide your deficits when riding a 250 fast because if you don't have the proper line and entry speed a twist of the throttle won't make it up. Goodluck with your decision and either of those choices is a good one..........
 
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