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I know they made 400CC versions of Bimotas in Japan. does anyone know more about these and what changes were made to create these? I do not think Bimota would have reengineered the bikes to put a 400 motor in for the handful that must have been sold. If I were them I would have slapped in the motor to make people happy and it's done.
 

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They made a DB1J for the Japanese market that was identical to the regular model except for the 400cc Yamaha Fazer engine. I have a YB7 in my collection also that was also a Japanese market bike, but while it looks like a YB6 when you put it next to a YB6 you see it is about a 7/8th version, smaller chassis and less weight.

The reason for the design was not simply the smaller stature of the average Japanese rider, but taxes. Anything over 400cc was waked heavily in taxes.

Bimota also built a couple 600cc bikes in it's first iteration, but these were Euro market bikes and did not go to Japan. (Bob Smith brought a handful into the US. My bike came out of Europe courtesy of Bob at Bimota Spirit.) The KB1 had a 600cc baby brother, the KB2. I have a YB9 monoposto in the collection, a 600cc Fazer engine out at the same time as the YB8. Again, a bit lighter and smaller than the 1000cc Bimota.

No means a complete list. Check the book or the lists/photos at the Bimota Enthusiats site.

Dave
 

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Bimota, 25 years of Excellence by Giorgio Sarti has the following data:

DB1J - 400cc Ducati Engine (derived from the F3 which was 350 then taken out to 400) - 52

DB2J - 400cc Ducati Engine (derived from the F3 which was 350 then taken out to 400) - 106

Tesi 1DJ - 400cc Ducati Engine (derived from the F3 which was 350 than taken out to 400) - 51

YB7 - 400cc FZR Yamaha Engine - 321, this is actually a 400cc version of the YB4 not the YB6.

All the bikes were builts by Bimota in Rimini as complete bikes or kitsets. The Japanese have a registration regime that makes it very expensive to own bikes over 400cc hence the poularity of this class over there. All other variants were available in Japan to those who could afford them (my DB1 orginally came from there), there were no Euro only models as such.

All the Japanese 400cc Japanese models were slotted straight into the standard model frames (eg DB1 > DB1J). Ducati used a common mounting points for most of theier engines and all engines are pretty much based on the same crankcases. The YB7 may have had minor changes to the YB4 frame to pick up the motor, there is not alot of detail on this particular model in the book.

Cheers
 

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I know they made 400CC versions of Bimotas in Japan. does anyone know more about these and what changes were made to create these? I do not think Bimota would have reengineered the bikes to put a 400 motor in for the handful that must have been sold. If I were them I would have slapped in the motor to make people happy and it's done.
I will ask in the factory,
but I'm almot sure that the new model is not available on 400cc!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I was talking about older models, rather than newer ones.
However this is an interesting question because of the 400 rules in Japan.
Glad I do not live there. Only from a motorcycle point of view!

I will ask in the factory,
but I'm almot sure that the new model is not available on 400cc!
 

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Hello,
The frame for the DB1, DB2 and YB7 400cc versions remained unchanged.

But for the 400 Tesi, as the engine was really smaller than the 851 one, Bimota designed a specific frame with shorter Omega plates. And for a batch of 50 bikes only...

5 Tesi 1/D 400 were fitted with the 'Folgore Bianca' fairing made by the Japanese firm White Power.

atomibart
 

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Well I don't know about the frame remaining the same on the YB 7 and the YB 6/8 but they appear to have reduced the bodywork, etc on the YB7 in comparison to the 1000cc models. The YB7 sits next to the YB8 here in our museum collection and the smaller overall package is quite apparent. Dave
 

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When I bought my DB1S I was competing with a Japanese buyer. I suppose if they can afford a Bimota or other exotica, the cost of registration, etc is of little consequence. I don't know if the potential Japanese buyer intended riding the DB1, or just sticking it in a glass case in his office or home.

The Japanese are clever people. They make their money selling huge numbers of UJMs to other markets, then use that money to buy Bimotas, roundcase Ducatis, Norton Commandos, Tritons, Vincents and Mk2 Jaguars for themselves.
 

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I had both the YB7 and DB2 Japanese market only with 400 motors. The YB7 was a gem but what was astonishing is how the DB2 was much more agile than I originally thought!
 

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Well I don't know about the frame remaining the same on the YB 7 and the YB 6/8 but they appear to have reduced the bodywork, etc on the YB7 in comparison to the 1000cc models. The YB7 sits next to the YB8 here in our museum collection and the smaller overall package is quite apparent. Dave
Frame on the YB7 was the same as the YB4 (FRZ 750) bikes not the YB6 or YB8 1000 cc varieties
 

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Bimota, 25 years of Excellence by Giorgio Sarti has the following data:

DB1J - 400cc Ducati Engine (derived from the F3 which was 350 then taken out to 400) - 52

DB2J - 400cc Ducati Engine (derived from the F3 which was 350 then taken out to 400) - 106

Tesi 1DJ - 400cc Ducati Engine (derived from the F3 which was 350 than taken out to 400) - 51

YB7 - 400cc FZR Yamaha Engine - 321, this is actually a 400cc version of the YB4 not the YB6.

All the bikes were builts by Bimota in Rimini as complete bikes or kitsets. The Japanese have a registration regime that makes it very expensive to own bikes over 400cc hence the poularity of this class over there. All other variants were available in Japan to those who could afford them (my DB1 orginally came from there), there were no Euro only models as such.

All the Japanese 400cc Japanese models were slotted straight into the standard model frames (eg DB1 > DB1J). Ducati used a common mounting points for most of theier engines and all engines are pretty much based on the same crankcases. The YB7 may have had minor changes to the YB4 frame to pick up the motor, there is not alot of detail on this particular model in the book.

Cheers
It was not only the price to own a larger bike. In Japan the bike license is in 2 parts up till 400 cc and 400 and over.
If you have the 400 cc license driving schools will charge you around 1000 US for the big bike license.
To get the big bike license directly I think it is something like 2500 US.

Cheapskate that I am I skipped the driving schools and went directly to the examination center. After 5 tries (they have some weird things that will make you fail and that is why you have to go to the driving school, they don't teach you how to drive they teach you all the tricks you need to know to pass the examination) and 200 US later I got my license.

The same is true with technical inspection. I paid 200 for inspection for 2 years with the obligatory insurance. Insurance is about 130 our of the 200.
Most people go to a bike shop who will pass the inspection for them. Bike shops charge around 700 - 900 for this.

Also they had a 400 CC racing class that was very popular.
 
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