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Would you consider buying the new 2021 Multistrada V4 now that you know the details?

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Will all due respect, confidence and $2 won't buy you a coffee at Starbucks. How can you make such a claim without having tried it? Your comment reads like a Ducati salesperson.
You just joined this tread without an introduction in the new member section which is proper etiquette.
At a minimum, we should tell us a bit about yourself what you're currently riding.
DarR,
Very fair! I will give you a run my background and what I own and ride, once I have a moment.
I have been a long time member of this and other forums but opened a new account because my old name (Ow595 & Owspeed) was attached to a very old AOL account.

William
Santa Cruz, Ca
 

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Seriously, What would you expect him to say?
People refuse to understand a concept where their income is contingient to not understanding it.
Having talked to many dealers & sales reps, most have given me to be what I assess in their honest opinion. I've had many share the very same sentiments seen here-- NOT liking the 19" front, concerns with the off-road bias, etc. This one rep and experienced Ducati owner/rider was sharing what seemed to be a well-informed opinion based on years riding the 950 with 19" front wheel. Seemed very credible, but as with anything take it with your own grain of salt...
 

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I'll second fipenna's views on the handling.
I have been motorcycling for the last 40 years. Presently own a 2018 1260s in the south of France and rent a 950's whenever I'm away on business in Mallorca to do the mountains.
Handling wise they both feel exactly the same. There is no perceivable difference in handling or braking.
In France I do a lot of miles with a friend who is out spoken on his views of, how good the 950 is. Unfortunately I have to quietly agree about the handling.
I hope this brings some clarity.
Mallorca, rentals.
View attachment 997021
Mons, looking down towards Cannes.
View attachment 997022
Merci de nous faire part de vos commentaires. Ceci est très instructif et utile. 👍
 

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DarR,
Very fair! I will give you a run my background and what I own and ride, once I have a moment.
I have been a long time member of this and other forums but opened a new account because my old name (Ow595 & Owspeed) was attached to a very old AOL account.

William
Santa Cruz, Ca
lol... AOL account... weren't those the days... haha. "You've got mail!"
 

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Hello HooDoo,
I am expecting and hoping that the factory settings will allow for a tire diameter reading, as is on my Panigale V4. So if I fit different ratio tires (55/60/65) you go to setting, ride it in 2nd gear until it has the readings, then all of the ABS, traction control etc is set. If not it should be able to be adjusted at a Ducati controller, but that would less than ideal.
Another feature I love on the V4 motor is the refined smoothness, but with the right amount of gear and engine rumble like the earlier V2's. The larger displacement should provide an amazingly wide torque curve, yet not be cranky at low RPM, as the big twins.

Another aspect I am anticipating, as though I am sad for the loss of the steel tube trellis frame (to me an epitome classic feature of Ducati, more so the SSSA), is the new monocoque from is only the width of the engine (20mm more than 1260 V2) opposed to the prior trellis frame wrapping and attaching to the outside of the engine. It should make the bike and cockpit slimmer and less hard protrusions.

I do plan to run the V4 Multi hard at Laguna when I get the chance. I feel fortunate to be in the area.

Cheers,

William
Santa Cruz, Ca
Personally, I wonder if this will be necessary: it is not the size of the wheel that matters, it is the slotted disk near the axle that matters, that is where the ABS sensor, speedo, etc is taking its readings. Provided that this component is correct, the fact that the wheels are a different size is immaterial.

Edit: my point here is that the sensor disk itself is, I think, what matters. But I suspect that you won't find a disk that will magically have the right pattern for measuring the rotation of a 17" wheel against a system that is calibrated for a 19" wheel.
 

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Personally, I wonder if this will be necessary: it is not the size of the wheel that matters, it is the slotted disk near the axle that matters, that is where the ABS sensor, speedo, etc is taking its readings. Provided that this component is correct, the fact that the wheels are a different size is immaterial.

Edit: my point here is that the sensor disk itself is, I think, what matters. But I suspect that you won't find a disk that will magically have the right pattern for measuring the rotation of a 17" wheel against a system that is calibrated for a 19" wheel.
Mmm... my elementary understanding of geometry, physics, and software/hardware integrations tells me that changing a major component like a 19” wheel to a 17” wheel will impact a whole lot of other systems given the change of circumference, weight, etc that the software/hardware systems are not tuned for.

I assume Ducati was smart and setup their software systems to allow this type to change, but there are a number of other interdependencies tied to that front wheel being 19”, an expected weight, etc. The odometer for one would need to be recalibrated given the change of circumference in that front wheel. (19xpi does not equal 17xpi)
 

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Mmm... my elementary understanding of geometry, physics, and software/hardware integrations tells me that changing a major component like a 19” wheel to a 17” wheel will impact a whole lot of other systems given the change of circumference, weight, etc that the software/hardware systems are not tuned for.........
Yes, first thing to be done if changing to a 17" wheel is to drop the forks in triples to raise the front of the bike.
From V4 pics there is about 2mm above triple, bummer if they have to be dropped 5mm or more.
A session with suspension guru Dave Moss would be recommended if geometry is being altered.
 

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i expect the new multi to be a great bike. All of the ADV bikes are great. My 2016 ktm SA is the best all around bike I have owned. Was considering a new multi until the power figures were announced. 170hp nice, but I want more. Simple as that.

now looking at the street fighter or super duke. Am also let down that ktm may not intro a new sd gt for 21. my pref is to add luggage for sport touring trips.
 

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Discussion Starter #89
There are quite a few people on this forum who routinely trackday their MTS. I'm sure a few have even used slicks on them. Prior to this model, Ducati spent 10 years marketing the Multi as a racing bike, the highest end version of the bike was sold as a showroom replica of the Pikes Peak race bikes. Even for the non-Pikes versions, the dealerships sold this model on the fact that it was just as at home on a racetrack as it was on a twisty road. Now, it's a bike you couldn't put slicks on if you wanted to.

WIll this impact most owners? No. But Ducati is an aspirational brand, people buy Ducati motorcycles as much because of what they dream about doing with them, as what they'll actually use them for. If that were not so, Ducati would sell a couple dozen Panigales a year. The lack of ability to fit proper track tires to the bike matters. It's an indication that they've decided to leave behind part of the original audience the MTS was marketed towards. It's not unreasonable for people to be upset about that.
+1^

There's a deviation in "for & against" ratio between Europe and here but the direction is the same with overwhelming comments against this new Multistrada positioning.

Screenshot from 2020-11-20 11:30:51.png


This post encapsulates the opinion survey:

Screenshot from 2020-11-20 11:32:27.png
 
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+1^

There's a deviation in "for & against" ratio between Europe and here but the direction is the same with overwhelming comments against this new Multistrada positioning.

This post encapsulates the opinion survey:
I think the same could have been said for the then-new Panigale V4.
Against it before it was unveiled or ridden:
Not an L-Twin.
Not 1000cc (not correct displacement for racing series).
No trellis frame, in fact, an alloy beam frame.
Using the Panigale name, instead of a new name for a completely new bike.
No dry clutch.

Now 4 model years later. was it a failure or success? some of those items have been corrected.
For the purpose it was built for and having spent two seasons on the track with it, I would say the latter.

William
Santa Cruz, Ca
2019 Panigale V4 full track Ohlins and kit
2019 Triumph Scrambler 1200XC
2016 Triumph Thruxton
2008 848 Full track kit
2016 KTM 350XCF
2015 KTM RC390 full track kit
Many vintage Ducati, Guzzi, Laverda and other classic British bikes.
 

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- 2020 Multistrada 1260S GT
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I think the same could have been said for the then-new Panigale V4.
Against it before it was unveiled or ridden:
Not an L-Twin.
Not 1000cc (not correct displacement for racing series).
No trellis frame, in fact, an alloy beam frame.
Using the Panigale name, instead of a new name for a completely new bike.
No dry clutch.

Now 4 model years later. was it a failure or success? some of those items have been corrected.
For the purpose it was built for and having spent two seasons on the track with it, I would say the latter.

William
Santa Cruz, Ca
2019 Panigale V4 full track Ohlins and kit
2019 Triumph Scrambler 1200XC
2016 Triumph Thruxton
2008 848 Full track kit
2016 KTM 350XCF
2015 KTM RC390 full track kit
Many vintage Ducati, Guzzi, Laverda and other classic British bikes.
But the complaint really isn’t the engine, everyone knew the engine was coming and tech upgrades and all that is all fine. The problem is everything else they did to it as well. The Pani was a sport bike before and is a sport bike after. The Multi was a sport touring bike before and is an offroad bike after. Full stop that is the single biggest problem. They took the choice away from us on different models for sport and offroad and said if you want a Multi in 2021 it will be an off road bike. They, this year at least, abandoned that market and that is a mistake cause it will push people to other brands. Most people aren't spending that much money on an offroad focused bike if you don’t do any off-roading and so they will mostly go look at BMW / KTM.
 

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Yeah the engine was fairly exciting (not Aprilia V4 exciting, tho), it's everything else that most of us are disappointed with (19" front, no single sided swing arm, heavier than previous bike, etc)

Personally I've never owned a dry clutch and I don't care to shrug
 

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Discussion Starter #93 (Edited)
I think the same could have been said for the then-new Panigale V4.
Against it before it was unveiled or ridden:
Not an L-Twin.
Not 1000cc (not correct displacement for racing series).
No trellis frame, in fact, an alloy beam frame.
Using the Panigale name, instead of a new name for a completely new bike.
No dry clutch.

Now 4 model years later. was it a failure or success? some of those items have been corrected.
For the purpose it was built for and having spent two seasons on the track with it, I would say the latter.

William
Santa Cruz, Ca
2019 Panigale V4 full track Ohlins and kit
2019 Triumph Scrambler 1200XC
2016 Triumph Thruxton
2008 848 Full track kit
2016 KTM 350XCF
2015 KTM RC390 full track kit
Many vintage Ducati, Guzzi, Laverda and other classic British bikes.
You just can't compare the Panigale V4 to this new Multistrada.
The Panigale V4 was extremely well received as everyone knew the WSBK rules were changing to limit the displacement to 1000 cc. Moreover, even with the 200 cc extra for the V2, it wasn't producing the horsepower to compete with the Kawasaki's.

FYI, The trellis was long gone and disappeared with the 1198. The Panigale series, 1199 or any other Panigale never had a trellis frame. Moving to a stronger frame from the aluminum box was a welcome addition. So was the engine which produced much more HP unlike this Grand Tourismo engine.

Last but not least, The Ducati MotoGP bikes were V4 since 2016 or couple of years prior to the launch of the Panigale V4. Everyone wanted the V4 engine when the Panigale V4 was offered in 2018.
Here's the 2016 Dicati MotoGP with the Desmosedici v4 engine.

 

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Agree, the issue isn't the motor, never was.
I was getting the new multi until I saw the package wrapped around the V4 motor.

Ducati are moving in a direction I'm not going.
This is where I get off. I'm not losing sleep over it.


.............Last but not least, The Ducati MotoGP bikes were V4 since 2016 or couple of years prior to the launch of the Panigale V4. Everyone wanted the V4 engine when the Panigale V4 was offered in 2018................
The V4 Desmosedici MotoGP bike was unveiled at Mugello 2002 and started racing MotoGP in 2003.

@williamow everyone knew V4 street bikes were coming. Arrival was longer then expected.
 

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Discussion Starter #95 (Edited)
Agree, the issue isn't the motor, never was.
I was getting the new multi until I saw the package wrapped around the V4 motor.

Ducati are moving in a direction I'm not going.
This is where I get off. I'm not losing sleep over it.
The V4 Desmosedici MotoGP bike was unveiled at Mugello 2002 and started racing MotoGP in 2003.
@williamow everyone knew V4 street bikes were coming. Arrival was longer then expected.
Even more so.
I knew a couple of years of V4 prior to 2018 in MotoGP but wow.. that long!
Why did Ducati wait so long.? They could have been more competitive in WSBK.

I echo your sentiment. I'm out also in the absence of new development.
 

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Ducatis first street V4 started being delivered January 2008.
The Desmosedici RR, street legal MotoGP replica.
Had to be pre ordered in 2006-07 1500 made @ $US72,500, $103,000 round my way.
Things did go quiet for a few years re street legal V4.

*if you are thinking of buying one, the rear wheel is a 16". Hard to find tyres.
 

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You just can't compare the Panigale V4 to this new Multistrada.
The Panigale V4 was extremely well received as everyone knew the WSBK rules were changing to limit the displacement to 1000 cc. Moreover, even with the 200 cc extra for the V2, it wasn't producing the horsepower to compete with the Kawasaki's.

FYI, The trellis was long gone and disappeared with the 1198. The Panigale series, 1199 or any other Panigale never had a trellis frame. Moving to a stronger frame from the aluminum box was a welcome addition. So was the engine which produced much more HP unlike this Grand Tourismo engine.

Last but not least, The Ducati MotoGP bikes were V4 since 2016 or a couple of years prior to the launch of the Panigale V4. Everyone wanted the V4 engine when the Panigale V4 was offered in 2018.
Here's the 2016 Ducati MotoGP with the Desmosedici v4 engine.

I remember a different history.
The Ducati superbikes have a many decades-longer history and changes were not welcome by a vocal majority on forums at the time and said to be the downfall of Ducati.
Most decreed the Ducatis were only twins and moving to a 4 cylinder motor, even if based on the prototype GP motors was not proper Ducati. Even though Ducati played with V4's since 1964 and racing V4's starting in 2002.
The Multistrada doesn't have as long a history, even when you should consider the Elefant and the E900, but those two are more like the new V4 Multi.
You can compare the history. It went from 900cc to 1000 to 1100cc air-cooled motors to 1200 then 1260 water-cooled twins. Not exactly a stable history. Realy it became the replacment for the ST.
I don't understand the bemoaning the loss of the SSSA, as it is really a newer fixture just for fashion (nothing wrong with that) but is it all form over function. As you don't see an SSSA on any highest level competition machine unless production-based and needs extensive modifications. But there is the sacrifice of pure performance over fashion. Trellis frames and dry clutches have a much longer history with Ducatis.
It mostly seems to stem from the loss of the 17" front wheel. You can perfectly street ride and sport tour on a 19" front wheel, in fact, it may do it better. I see the only real downside is the lack of track rubber but honestly you dont see many Multis on ther track.

I do lament the loss of the trellis frame, as it has a long tradition with Ducati. And KTM via MotoGP has proven it still has merit.
The V2 Panigale had the Monocoque frame but said arguably not to handle as well as the trellis on the 848/1198 series but it did have the advantage of weight.

Last, the 1199 did have the power to compete with an SBK machine but because of the 200cc advantage the intake had to be restricted hence slightly down on top-end power. I think a better path was shown to complete on level paying field at 1000cc and use the MotoGP experience and technology to compete. The 1299 was just a brute on the track and not the ideal track weapon.

All fun banter, until the new V4 Multi is available to ride and see how it actually performs.

Cheers,

William
Santa Cruz, Ca
 

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Discussion Starter #98
@williamow
That was an interesting read BTW. I won't touch the performance aspect of the SSSA but I can say that it's much easier to work with than a double sided unit. Removing the rear wheel from a SSSA is a cinch.
 
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