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Thoughts on the new Monster?

  • Love It!

    Votes: 8 17.4%
  • Meh... It's okay

    Votes: 19 41.3%
  • It's horrible... not a real monster

    Votes: 13 28.3%
  • Waiting to see on the reviews

    Votes: 6 13.0%
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Looks fine to me. I've been riding the original Monsters for 27 years, and have put 300K miles on them, and I'm fine if they change the frame design. Once upon a time, all bike frames were welded steel tubes; then in the '80's the Japanese manufacturers all went to extruded aluminum beams for their high performance bikes, because those were better. Ducati couldn't afford the extrusion machines, so they developed a method of triangulating welded steel tubes, combined with a stressed engine design, that was as good at the time, and made that one of their trademark designs.

To me, the thing that makes Ducati special, the reason I ride them, is that I prefer twins over fours, and Ducati was the only real sporting machine that was a 2-cyl design. The desmos are cool, but functionally, they are not a big advantage ; they mainly allow for more aggressive cam timing than valve spring designs.

Other than those 3 things, and Italian design flair, Ducatis aren't much different from other bikes.

So yeah, I'd be fine with an aluminum-framed Monster, with valve springs, and whatever else they wanted to do, as long as it was (a) a naked standard bike, in order to still be a Monster, and (b) a 2-cyl engine, in order to keep what makes Ducati good for what I like. And if they go to a V-4 at some point, I won't claim it isn't a Monster anymore, either. I just won't buy one and would get some other twin -- a KTM or Moto Guzzi or BMW or something.
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The Monster doesn't look like all those Japanese bikes. All those Japanese bikes look like the Monster.

What we forget is that the Monster created the segment. I remember very clearly in 1993, because I was looking to get a decent vehicle or two at the time. I'd gotten a good job -- my first job with a career path -- and saved up some money, about $10K. I wanted a decent used car and a decent used bike. For the bike, what I wanted was a light sporty naked bike, sort of a modern reliable version of a Norton Commando, preferably with 2 cylinders, and there was no such thing on the market. Not anywhere, not made by anybody. I was trying to figure out whether I was going to (a) give up on 2-cyl, get a Japanese sportbike and streetfighter it, (b) give up on modern and reliable, buy 2 Commandos and rebuild them in alternate years, or compromise on performance, and get a 1987 Honda Hawk 650GT, which was perfect except for having a measly 37hp.

Then I saw the article in Cycle World on the 1993 Cologne bike show, with one small picture of the Monster prototype. They said they were going to make 5000, allocate 2 per dealer and see if anyone bought it. If not, that would be all there would be. It was exactly what I wanted. So I said "who needs a car, anyway?", looked up the local Duc dealer in the phone book, went and gave him all my money, without having even seen the bike in person, just that one small picture, and waited for them to be produced and shipped.

3 months later, I had my Monster. A few years after that, there were half a dozen copies of it on the market -- everyone was making a naked 2-cyl sporty bike. The Monster was the original, and has continued to be one of the best. It's hard to stand out from the crowd when the crowd is following you around.
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The only thing I don't like is the number of plastic bits, and the fiberglass tail.

I keep my stuff for a long time, and rarely let go of a good bike before 80K miles. Plastic doesn't hold up well long enough; it gets brittle and breaks. Fiberglass has similar weaknesses.

One of the things that drew me to the Monster in the first place was how little plastic it had on it.
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Below is a pic of my first Monster (red), a 1993 M900 that I bought new and put 265K miles on over 24 years. The pic is from 2016, on the weekend it turned over 250K miles.

And a pic of my current Monster (yellow), a 1995 M900, loaded for a trip.
1001598

1001599
 

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That is an absolutely ludicrous amount of luggage. And here I thought my wife had trouble over packing...
Well, it wasn't just a weekend trip. I was traveling halfway across the country (New Hampshire to Minnesota) to take on a job project for 8 months, so I was carrying with me everything I needed to live and work for months in a city I had never been to. That IS "packing light", when you're effectively moving house.

PhilB
 
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Looks fine to me. I've been riding the original Monsters for 27 years, and have put 300K miles on them, and I'm fine if they change the frame design. Once upon a time, all bike frames were welded steel tubes; then in the '80's the Japanese manufacturers all went to extruded aluminum beams for their high performance bikes, because those were better. Ducati couldn't afford the extrusion machines, so they developed a method of triangulating welded steel tubes, combined with a stressed engine design, that was as good at the time, and made that one of their trademark designs.

To me, the thing that makes Ducati special, the reason I ride them, is that I prefer twins over fours, and Ducati was the only real sporting machine that was a 2-cyl design. The desmos are cool, but functionally, they are not a big advantage ; they mainly allow for more aggressive cam timing than valve spring designs.

Other than those 3 things, and Italian design flair, Ducatis aren't much different from other bikes.

So yeah, I'd be fine with an aluminum-framed Monster, with valve springs, and whatever else they wanted to do, as long as it was (a) a naked standard bike, in order to still be a Monster, and (b) a 2-cyl engine, in order to keep what makes Ducati good for what I like. And if they go to a V-4 at some point, I won't claim it isn't a Monster anymore, either. I just won't buy one and would get some other twin -- a KTM or Moto Guzzi or BMW or something.
=====
The Monster doesn't look like all those Japanese bikes. All those Japanese bikes look like the Monster.

What we forget is that the Monster created the segment. I remember very clearly in 1993, because I was looking to get a decent vehicle or two at the time. I'd gotten a good job -- my first job with a career path -- and saved up some money, about $10K. I wanted a decent used car and a decent used bike. For the bike, what I wanted was a light sporty naked bike, sort of a modern reliable version of a Norton Commando, preferably with 2 cylinders, and there was no such thing on the market. Not anywhere, not made by anybody. I was trying to figure out whether I was going to (a) give up on 2-cyl, get a Japanese sportbike and streetfighter it, (b) give up on modern and reliable, buy 2 Commandos and rebuild them in alternate years, or compromise on performance, and get a 1987 Honda Hawk 650GT, which was perfect except for having a measly 37hp.

Then I saw the article in Cycle World on the 1993 Cologne bike show, with one small picture of the Monster prototype. They said they were going to make 5000, allocate 2 per dealer and see if anyone bought it. If not, that would be all there would be. It was exactly what I wanted. So I said "who needs a car, anyway?", looked up the local Duc dealer in the phone book, went and gave him all my money, without having even seen the bike in person, just that one small picture, and waited for them to be produced and shipped.

3 months later, I had my Monster. A few years after that, there were half a dozen copies of it on the market -- everyone was making a naked 2-cyl sporty bike. The Monster was the original, and has continued to be one of the best. It's hard to stand out from the crowd when the crowd is following you around.
=====
The only thing I don't like is the number of plastic bits, and the fiberglass tail.

I keep my stuff for a long time, and rarely let go of a good bike before 80K miles. Plastic doesn't hold up well long enough; it gets brittle and breaks. Fiberglass has similar weaknesses.

One of the things that drew me to the Monster in the first place was how little plastic it had on it.
=====
Below is a pic of my first Monster (red), a 1993 M900 that I bought new and put 265K miles on over 24 years. The pic is from 2016, on the weekend it turned over 250K miles.

And a pic of my current Monster (yellow), a 1995 M900, loaded for a trip.
Great post - thanks for sharing. Amazing. I recall the debut of Il Mostro while living in London and hated it. But a few years later back in the US the styling finally clicked with me and I bought one. Loved them since - though must admit I'm still partial to the original iconic cues and design traits. They ask so little and are capable of so much, having also toured for a week on a 1200 model in Italy (by pure coincidence I'm literally wearing that trip t-shirt I designed right now).
My first Ducati purchase is similar to @PhilBoncer - agonizing over the ultimate sports touring bike when news of the ST2 arrived. Based on a few glam photos and very few write-ups, I took my deposit down to Geoff at GP Motorcycles in San Diego to wait for months to get the first one. Still own it. I had Geoff arrange for it to be painted red (delivered black) before I ever laid eyes on it.
 

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Losing the look of the earlier generation has divided opinions but I see the benefits to the tradeoffs.
I run a 2018 Monster 821 and thus far has been a good experience with Ducati and the local dealership.... warranty and all 🤞
With the new one is lighter, a bit more power, and better ergo (turning radius and all) losing the look (trellis frame, bulgy tank, etc) is not a negative at all.
Perhaps now the Monster can go toe to toe with the likes of Street Triple, 890 Duke, MT09, and not be told off about the heft or the 30 point u-turns. Hoping to see more refinement on the electronics as well (reliable fuel gauge for one) and some bits and bobs that were optional, now made standard (DQS, Ducati Multimedia, etc), and perhaps a couple of changes to allow for easier battery maintenance (try to get a battery tender on the 2018 model or change the battery without a service kit).
It will be interesting to see how close the new model performs vs. the current Hyper series as both share the same motor and seem to be in similar tune as well. Weight-wise should be close too.

For the purists, perhaps Ducati could have tried to have the new chassis given a look like it's a trellis to keep the look of the outgoing model. Fuel tank size going down while displacement going up also another area they could have looked more into - 4.6 down to 3.7 gallons will mean planning the rides with a fuel station in mind.
Hopefully, the twisty pipe on the rear cylinder won't roast the delicate bits.🔥
 

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View attachment 999860
I don’t understand the evolution of the foot pegs holders... 2018 version you could easily remove the passenger foot pegs and holder for a clean look
I completely agree. My only real complant about my 17 821 is the passenger pegs, the change in 2018 was glorious and I have been searching for a used pair ever-since. Or I can bight the bullet and switch out for Ducabike.
 

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Well, it wasn't just a weekend trip. I was traveling halfway across the country (New Hampshire to Minnesota) to take on a job project for 8 months, so I was carrying with me everything I needed to live and work for months in a city I had never been to. That IS "packing light", when you're effectively moving house.

PhilB
Ha ha, even though that is a "ridiculous amount of luggage", I think we all have to cut you some slack if you really did put 265k on a Monster.....
 

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Ha ha, even though that is a "ridiculous amount of luggage", I think we all have to cut you some slack if you really did put 265k on a Monster.....
I did. And it was cut short by a hit-and-run driver about 3 years ago; totalled the bike. Otherwise I'd still be riding it, and be over 300K by now.

PhilB
 
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I did. And it was cut short by a hit-and-run driver about 3 years ago; totalled the bike. Otherwise I'd still be riding it, and be over 300K by now.

PhilB
Effin amazing! Even more amazing is that you're still able to do this after that.
 

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Effin amazing! Even more amazing is that you're still able to do this after that.
Yes, that was very lucky. The woman pulled out right in front of me, and I piled into the side of the minivan at about 45mph. Broke the frame on the Duc. I was knocked out for several minutes, but I didn't break any of my own parts, and seem to not have suffered any permanent damage. I felt thoroughly thumped, and slept for about 2 months to get everything back to normal, but i never needed to go to the hospital after the initial checkup.

The driver left the scene. They caught her later, and she was charged with felonies. No license, no insurance, record of violations a mile long; wasn't her van, the van owner didn't have insurance either. Just a mess. I had uninsured motorist coverage, so that paid me a few bucks, but not very much for a 24-year-old bike with about 10 bikes worth of miles on it. :(

But at least I'm OK and still riding. I was in the middle of a divorce at the time, but my ex-wife was sweet enough to put everything on hold and let me sleep it off, and since she didn't think she was going to be riding much without me, she gave me her M900 to replace mine, which is the bike I'm riding now.

PhilB
 

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What's everyone's thoughts on the new Monster?

Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wu_2Gyl3Bu4

View attachment 999832
I'm sure it's a good bike.....as many others as well. The new design completely lost the character, and that's why we love Ducati and especially the Monsters. I personally don't care if it will go a bit faster or is a bit lighter, because the average rider isn't going to the limits at all. For me it's a motorcycle without any wow effect anymore...... unfortunately.
 

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I'm sure it's a good bike.....as many others as well. The new design completely lost the character, and that's why we love Ducati and especially the Monsters. I personally don't care if it will go a bit faster or is a bit lighter, because the average rider isn't going to the limits at all. For me it's a motorcycle without any wow effect anymore...... unfortunately.
Nailed it.


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Hi All,

New to the forum. I'm actually debating wether or not to pull the trigger on purchasing a 2021 M1200s. Does anyone know if Ducati is phasing out the 1200s design with the new design onto their 2022 models? TIA!
 
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