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I had a similar wobble on my 2011 Multi and thought nothing of it, until I narrowed it down to the tires. In addition, I test drove a Motus for a second time, before I bought my 2018 Mts and it had those same tires and major wobble. It wasn’t the bike as I test drove another one with the Pirellis and it was fine.
 

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Ducati knows there is a stability problem with the DVT Multi. That is why they added 2 inches to the swing arm and 1 degree to the fork angel for the '18 model year.
 

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I had a similar wobble on my 2011 Multi and thought nothing of it, until I narrowed it down to the tires. In addition, I test drove a Motus for a second time, before I bought my 2018 Mts and it had those same tires and major wobble. It wasn’t the bike as I test drove another one with the Pirellis and it was fine.
I hope so brother! i'm gonna change Michelins with Pirelli scorpions 2 or diablo corsa? what do you suggest?
 

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Ducati knows there is a stability problem with the DVT Multi. That is why they added 2 inches to the swing arm and 1 degree to the fork angel for the '18 model year.
if this is true, that I suppose so, ducati knew from the very beginning back in 2010...the problem...
 

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That “problem” is if you want a sport touring bike that handles like a sport bike naked, it’s not going to have great high speed stability when loaded for touring.

My ST3S and my KTM 990 SMT both fall into this category. It’s really not a big deal. The manufactures always warn about it happening in the owners manual.

The only time it bothers me is when getting into the turbulence of 18 wheelers on the highway when passing them at 90+ mph. I just get light on the bars and ride through it.


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Discussion Starter #26
That “problem” is if you want a sport touring bike that handles like a sport bike naked, it’s not going to have great high speed stability when loaded for touring.

My ST3S and my KTM 990 SMT both fall into this category. It’s really not a big deal. The manufactures always warn about it happening in the owners manual.

The only time it bothers me is when getting into the turbulence of 18 wheelers on the highway when passing them at 90+ mph. I just get light on the bars and ride through it.


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I agree. Problem is we ride very fast a good portion of the time. 90mph is our average on trips, with lots of bursts above that. I still would like to know how the damn GS1200 is so stable, must be the telelever front. I have now lost on a top speed race on an S1000XR and the Multi, both due to speed wobble. Kinda sucks because they're always touting their GS's are the best. Maybe so. I can't get around looks of them(yet). But they are starting to make me a believer lol. I just want this Multi to be as fast as its designed, everything else I love about it.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Ducati knows there is a stability problem with the DVT Multi. That is why they added 2 inches to the swing arm and 1 degree to the fork angel for the '18 model year.

Yes we discussed that at the end of the day, around a few beers. The GS1200 is shaped like a brick, yet has no problem with stability or corner carving for that matter.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
So in the mean time, I ordered up a 14T c/s sprocket. More acceleration can't hurt right? :grin2: I don't buy into the hype about the smaller sprocket causing chain wear and swingarm issues. The difference in circumference is negligible. Also, adjusting the chain for the new slack will effectively add to the wheelbase. Could help a tad with stability, and keep the front planted too.:nerd:
 

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So in the mean time, I ordered up a 14T c/s sprocket. More acceleration can't hurt right? :grin2: I don't buy into the hype about the smaller sprocket causing chain wear and swingarm issues. The difference in circumference is negligible. Also, adjusting the chain for the new slack will effectively add to the wheelbase. Could help a tad with stability, and keep the front planted too.:nerd:
I love my 14t front. When it comes time for a new chain, I’ll likely go back to the 15 and add teeth to the back, but for now, it’s a perfect solution.
 

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Several of my friends from the old Ducati ST forum are now on BMW RTs. They ride 2 up and do long tours. I sat on one yesterday. So wide. But that is what provides the excellent wind protection. I am not ready to jump ship but it is nice to know there are choices.
 

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bought a sportiest boxer BMW I could afford (R1100S) and after one trip jumped ship and bought a Multi, while Beemer seems more stable it's not as fast and has very numb handling, no feedback from the telelever at all.

Maybe with age I will go back to BMW but for now I will have to deal with some instability while taking the MTS to the limit once in a while, unless I can find affordable SE 950R
 

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Discussion Starter #32
bought a sportiest boxer BMW I could afford (R1100S) and after one trip jumped ship and bought a Multi, while Beemer seems more stable it's not as fast and has very numb handling, no feedback from the telelever at all.

Maybe with age I will go back to BMW but for now I will have to deal with some instability while taking the MTS to the limit once in a while, unless I can find affordable SE 950R
Real world conditions the newer liquid cooled GS is a formidable tool in the right hands. Straight line, yeah a couple bike lengths back to 100mph. But then, no speed wobble, and they continue to 135'ish mph with bags, no issues. 25-35mph posted corners, GS is really planted. They lose me over time on tight corners. I'm not a knee dragger, but my chicken strips are <1/4". I do outweigh them both by about 80 lbs., so that's significant. At 45mph( posted) and up corners, Multi takes over a little, but not much. It more depends on who's feeling it at the moment. We did a day of offroad, and again the GS was better suited for that. I haven't given up on my Multi though. I'm also 10 yrs. older than them, and I admit I have lost a bit of sharpness. I also only ride about 80-85% of my ability, some stretches at 90-95% when I can see far ahead and no blind corners or driveways.
 

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Real world conditions the newer liquid cooled GS is a formidable tool in the right hands. Straight line, yeah a couple bike lengths back to 100mph. But then, no speed wobble, and they continue to 135'ish mph with bags, no issues. 25-35mph posted corners, GS is really planted. They lose me over time on tight corners. I'm not a knee dragger, but my chicken strips are <1/4". I do outweigh them both by about 80 lbs., so that's significant. At 45mph( posted) and up corners, Multi takes over a little, but not much. It more depends on who's feeling it at the moment. We did a day of offroad, and again the GS was better suited for that. I haven't given up on my Multi though. I'm also 10 yrs. older than them, and I admit I have lost a bit of sharpness. I also only ride about 80-85% of my ability, some stretches at 90-95% when I can see far ahead and no blind corners or driveways.
I have couple friends with big GS's, one with clutch upfront, whatever that changeover model was and one that's a year older, I was on a Tuono and another guy on GSXR750 when we got on some fire roads, I was goooone, kicking the tail out, Gixxer followed (he is a bit crazy) meanwhile I can hear the GS boys on the Sena "Please wait for me, I have to switch to off-road mode" and even after they got the electronics sorted we still had to wait for them. I'm not any kind of daredevil and only started riding dirt in the past 8 or 9 years when I got the KTM, also older than GS guys and don't ever go 100%, even on track, but apparently those two are even slower than me. I guess the point I'm trying to make is that I never met anyone on big GS who can really let it sing, most of the GS riders (that I know) stay clean and don't go fast enough to get arrested, the whole BMW image (before S1000) was "old and wise" also well funded.
Rode with some BMW guys in Pine Barens at PB500, that reinforced my opinion about the guys who show up on spotless clean $30,000 ADV bikes and wear riding gear that cost more than my bike and entire riding kit combined :)
 

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I have couple friends with big GS's, one with clutch upfront, whatever that changeover model was and one that's a year older, I was on a Tuono and another guy on GSXR750 when we got on some fire roads, I was goooone, kicking the tail out, Gixxer followed (he is a bit crazy) meanwhile I can hear the GS boys on the Sena "Please wait for me, I have to switch to off-road mode" and even after they got the electronics sorted we still had to wait for them. I'm not any kind of daredevil and only started riding dirt in the past 8 or 9 years when I got the KTM, also older than GS guys and don't ever go 100%, even on track, but apparently those two are even slower than me. I guess the point I'm trying to make is that I never met anyone on big GS who can really let it sing, most of the GS riders (that I know) stay clean and don't go fast enough to get arrested, the whole BMW image (before S1000) was "old and wise" also well funded.
Rode with some BMW guys in Pine Barens at PB500, that reinforced my opinion about the guys who show up on spotless clean $30,000 ADV bikes and wear riding gear that cost more than my bike and entire riding kit combined :)
If you overrun GS on Tuono on gravel that could only mean one of the things: you are an excellent rider or your GS friends don't know how to ride adventure bikes at all and should, probably, switch to scooters
 

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If you overrun GS on Tuono on gravel that could only mean one of the things: you are an excellent rider or your GS friends don't know how to ride adventure bikes at all and should, probably, switch to scooters
I say the later, don't think I ever met anyone who rode GS fast on any surface.

I am no slouch and I do ride that Ape like I stole it, but I have seen some "real" dirt pros go by me (usually on KTM's) and I know that I could never, ever, ever do that. Maybe if I had started young... but learning to ride dirt in my late 30's I had a steep learning curve with several injuries, that was a reality check, too old and too much at stake. I'm never gonna get faster, might just learn how to crash less :)
 

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I say the later, don't think I ever met anyone who rode GS fast on any surface.
I met one.

My son and I did a 10 day tour of the Alps in July with a mixed crowd from Europe, Brazil, New Zealand and Australia; it was a blast. We were on S1000XR, most others were on GS; the guy who rented a Multi threw it down the road on the wet training day and had to do the tour on a GS. The rider no one could keep up with, including the guides, up and down 26 mountain passes and some crazy narrow roads was a Kiwi riding two up on a GS with his wife taking snapshots with her camera the whole time. The Brazilian couple, also 2 up on a GS, was also right near the head of the pack.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
I met one.

My son and I did a 10 day tour of the Alps in July with a mixed crowd from Europe, Brazil, New Zealand and Australia; it was a blast. We were on S1000XR, most others were on GS; the guy who rented a Multi threw it down the road on the wet training day and had to do the tour on a GS. The rider no one could keep up with, including the guides, up and down 26 mountain passes and some crazy narrow roads was a Kiwi riding two up on a GS with his wife taking snapshots with her camera the whole time. The Brazilian couple, also 2 up on a GS, was also right near the head of the pack.
Yes, I ride with two of them! They are fast riders, as am I. I prefer to be humble, and surprise and delight rather than be boastful and disappoint. We heard the owner of the BMW store in Medford OR., routinely goes out on track days and spanks sportbikes. Not all of course, but most. The bike will do more than it is given credit for. The Multi is also capable in the right hands, but I think it takes a better rider to exploit it than the GS does.

Sounds like an awesome ride, wow!
 

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I met one.

My son and I did a 10 day tour of the Alps in July with a mixed crowd from Europe, Brazil, New Zealand and Australia; it was a blast. We were on S1000XR, most others were on GS; the guy who rented a Multi threw it down the road on the wet training day and had to do the tour on a GS. The rider no one could keep up with, including the guides, up and down 26 mountain passes and some crazy narrow roads was a Kiwi riding two up on a GS with his wife taking snapshots with her camera the whole time. The Brazilian couple, also 2 up on a GS, was also right near the head of the pack.
You put a good rider on those GS's and they will give most bikes a good run for their money. But the GS range doesn't often attract those that like to test the sidewalls for grip, more a gentleman's touring bike, but far more capable a bike in the right hands. Great bikes, i think they look cool.
 

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chased Roy (JosuaZ) 2 up with his daughter on MTS12 riding Blue Ridge, I could barely keep up with him, I was solo on a Tuono...

Now I have a new idea that I want to try Super Tenere out, supposed to be everything that GS is but less expensive and almost zero maintenance.
 

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Discussion Starter #40
chased Roy (JosuaZ) 2 up with his daughter on MTS12 riding Blue Ridge, I could barely keep up with him, I was solo on a Tuono...

Now I have a new idea that I want to try Super Tenere out, supposed to be everything that GS is but less expensive and almost zero maintenance.

GS maintenance is very cheap compared to Ducati. I did the valve adjust on my buddy's bike on a lunch hour, never having done it before too. Shaft drive is easier than chain. Spark plugs practically are in your hand, rear wheel comes off 5 min. etc. I would say less maintenance than the Yamaha actually.
 
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