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Thought I would address some of the opinions above, since I’ve been lowering and modifying bikes my whole life to make them fit me.
Lowered Seat: If the shape is better, or the foam is better, you can lower the seat height and actually improve comfort. If you like the bike that much and nothing over the counter suits you, pro seat makers can do amazing things. Gel inserts, memory foam, rounded side profile all can increase comfort.
Geometry: Riders have been changing geometry since motorcycles were invented. Of course you want to do your homework before doing anything radical, but if you lower both ends the same amount you don’t change the geometry. You have to use your brain . You don’t run out to the shed and just do any mod you read on the Interweb. Fear of making a change that might improve your riding experience is just as foolish as continuing to ride the bike as is and not be happy. Harley Davidson knows this. They have made low models of many of their bikes for years. They sell proven items in their accessories catalog to lower their motorcycles.
If you really , really love the bike, buy new lower suspension. The Multi is kind of a ridiculous motorcycle, built for a rider that really doesn’t exist. A 6’6” guy that rides off road on a 450# motorcycle With bags and a windshield. You don’t see those everyday. The rest of the Multi riders are dreamers who wish they did that. Most of them also wish there was a lower version, not needing a foot of ground clearance.
 

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Discussion Starter #22
Thought I would address some of the opinions above, since I’ve been lowering and modifying bikes my whole life to make them fit me.
Lowered Seat: If the shape is better, or the foam is better, you can lower the seat height and actually improve comfort. If you like the bike that much and nothing over the counter suits you, pro seat makers can do amazing things. Gel inserts, memory foam, rounded side profile all can increase comfort.
Geometry: Riders have been changing geometry since motorcycles were invented. Of course you want to do your homework before doing anything radical, but if you lower both ends the same amount you don’t change the geometry. You have to use your brain . You don’t run out to the shed and just do any mod you read on the Interweb. Fear of making a change that might improve your riding experience is just as foolish as continuing to ride the bike as is and not be happy. Harley Davidson knows this. They have made low models of many of their bikes for years. They sell proven items in their accessories catalog to lower their motorcycles.
If you really , really love the bike, buy new lower suspension. The Multi is kind of a ridiculous motorcycle, built for a rider that really doesn’t exist. A 6’6” guy that rides off road on a 450# motorcycle With bags and a windshield. You don’t see those everyday. The rest of the Multi riders are dreamers who wish they did that. Most of them also wish there was a lower version, not needing a foot of ground clearance.
While I'm certainly not that guy (nowhere near 6'6", and only off-road by accident, normally), in 2013, if I wanted a bike that could keep up with my friends on sport bikes, and also let me pack up some luggage, put my wife on the back and take a longer trip with the other group of rider-friends I have are distance-oriented, the Multi was one of the few choices out there. Other than spending close to 10k more for a Goldwing or a K1600, I can't think of another bike that would have been a good match. I've ridden it on some pretty long trips (1500m Ironbutt, for example) so I can manage it, but it would be nice to have less parking lot anxiety.
 

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Lowering a motorcycle should be a last resort endeavor. A common misconception about lowering both the front and rear equally and not affecting geometry is patently false. Other than the obvious reduction in cornering clearance, lowering a bike changes the wheelbase, reduces trail and may affect suspension sag among other altrered characteristics.
 

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I didn't realize the newer bikes were lower, that's a little intriguing. Nice to know I'm not the only one struggling with it.
Thanks!
I was surprised as well as my Monster 1200R is taller than my Multi 1260 Pikes Peak. While I can't flat foot either, both bike's seat height are a non-issue and certainly not in the realm of the Enduro or Hypermotard.
 

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I've ridden a few "high" bikes, so you just get used to hanging your butt over slightly to the right side when you come to a stop. I don't need two feet flat on the ground: one is enough for me. YMMV

A few years back, someone posted a custom-machined spacer that they used to lower the Skyhook suspension a bit (I didn't really "get" how it was supposed to work, however). I've been living with this bike (and my 29" inseam) since it was new, but I'm getting tired of tiptoeing in and out of parking spaces and the like. Has anyone come up with a decent way to lower the suspension on this bike? I put it in Urban mode to get a little more sag if I know I'm going to be is a questionable foot situation, but it's not always enough or convenient. I love this bike (except the fuel sensor and rear brake, of course), but I'm seriously considering getting something different, just for a lower seat height. I do have the low-profile seat, but it doesn't make much difference at all.

Thanks and ride safe!
 

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I have passed up many bikes that just didn’t fit me. Its like wearing tight underwear , it’s a choice. Comfort or style. Why do I need to be way up in the air if I don’t need the ground clearance ( Like 97% of MTS owners) ? If you think being stopping At a light and putting that “ one foot” down in loose gravel isn’t going to happen to you, you’re naive or inexperienced.
 

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I agree that you get used to taller bikes, especially if you ride often and it’s your only bike. Seat shape makes as much of a difference as height. The BMW r1200gs are a little shorter I find, but also less sporty. Definitely great touring adventure bikes but have less soul.
 

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A few years back, someone posted a custom-machined spacer that they used to lower the Skyhook suspension a bit (I didn't really "get" how it was supposed to work, however). I've been living with this bike (and my 29" inseam) since it was new, but I'm getting tired of tiptoeing in and out of parking spaces and the like. Has anyone come up with a decent way to lower the suspension on this bike? I put it in Urban mode to get a little more sag if I know I'm going to be is a questionable foot situation, but it's not always enough or convenient. I love this bike (except the fuel sensor and rear brake, of course), but I'm seriously considering getting something different, just for a lower seat height. I do have the low-profile seat, but it doesn't make much difference at all.

Thanks and ride safe!
 

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I have an elegant and relatively inexpensive solution to your problem. Take your boots to a good shoe repair shop and have them raise the soles by 3/4". I've done that and it greatly increases my contact with the ground at stops. I also did this on my former bike, a tall BMW. Total cost was in the neighborhood of $100. Advise against lowering your bike for two reasons: It will affect the handling and lower the resale value because most shoppers aren't looking for lowered bikes.
 

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Lowering a motorcycle should be a last resort endeavor. A common misconception about lowering both the front and rear equally and not affecting geometry is patently false. Other than the obvious reduction in cornering clearance, lowering a bike changes the wheelbase, reduces trail and may affect suspension sag among other altrered characteristics.
You are correct that lowering the front and rear equally does have some effect on geometry but he the total change is very small and should not affect the handling on the motorcycle any more than adjusting your chain, changing your sprockets, changing your tires, changing one tire with out changing both, or even riding a motorcycle being 20 lbs over or under the design weight. Most track bike have altered suspensions to hopefully improve on what the factory has designed. Not all changes are productive but if you are concerned about any change being dangerous because its a change you should not change your tires from the exact ones that came with the motorcycle from the manufacturer and that is good for some people but some people want to make improvements to their motorcycles.
 

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To not make changes to your motorcycle in an effort to improve it in some way or make it fit you better is to assume it was perfect for you in every way just as it left the factory and no improvements in technology have been made since the motorcycle was designed which might benefit you. Further that you are exactly the same height, weight , and skill level as everyone else, and your use of the motorcycle, and your knowledge skill at modifying motorcycles is the same as everyone else . Maybe you are that person , I’m not. Most Ducati owners are not that person either. Even the factory lowered the bike, for cripe sakes.
 

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Guys, both of you: @Jdan and @duc96cr have valid points. I was just stating an obvious flaw in lowering reasoning. I am just suggesting that one should attempt other measures (see post #19) before tampering with geometry, which within reason, may not be noticeable to the average street riders.
Take the average Harley rider as an example. They don't give a sh!t about geometry and cornering clearance. They're happy.
This video epitomizes respect. Hope you'll agree.
 

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chain adjustment even on cam style bikes is a relatively small vertical displacement... (fractions of an inch in a properly configured bike, cosine error). If that will fix your height problem then you probably don't have a height problem. If you're moving things by inches then it's a bit more substantial move. It's not like it'll make you crash the first time you hit a corner... but it will change the dynamic behavior of the bike from what the manufacturer intended. Likely the effect would amount to slower lap times (which almost none of us really care about) but if you push it far enough it could affect even road performance.
 
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