Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
A few years back, someone posted a custom-machined spacer that they used to lower the Skyhook suspension a bit (I didn't really "get" how it was supposed to work, however). I've been living with this bike (and my 29" inseam) since it was new, but I'm getting tired of tiptoeing in and out of parking spaces and the like. Has anyone come up with a decent way to lower the suspension on this bike? I put it in Urban mode to get a little more sag if I know I'm going to be is a questionable foot situation, but it's not always enough or convenient. I love this bike (except the fuel sensor and rear brake, of course), but I'm seriously considering getting something different, just for a lower seat height. I do have the low-profile seat, but it doesn't make much difference at all.

Thanks and ride safe!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,109 Posts
30” inseam here. The solution is involved but simple. You have to give up looking for the holy grail. There is no ” magic” One Thing you can do. So , if you really love the bike, you have to do multiple things, each of which will buy you another 1/2” or inch, and in the end , it all adds up and you’re comfortable. I don’t know anything about SkyHook suspension, so some of my suggestions may not apply.
1) Boots - Some make you taller than others. Adventure boot soles and heels can add an inch or more to your height.
2) Seat - Look around and compare height. Even though you have a low seat, do you have the LOWEST seat available ? And there is always a custom seat on your stock pan .
3) Suspension- If you have your suspension set up just the way you like it, the best you can manage is to lower both ends the same amount. Look into the spacer, it could help. Can you lower the food by sliding the legs up in the triples ? Is there a way to lower the rear the same amount , spring mounts or whatever ? Sorry I can’t help with specific ideas, but I know nothing about SkyHook suspension. The mare sag you’re willing to live with obviously gives you a lower seat.
4) Tires- Start measuring tire height, look into a change in aspect ratio. They are definitely not all the same. Even going down a tire size will lower the bike and generally won’t hurt a thing. A smaller tire will fall into turns with less effort.

Not cheap, but if you love the bike, new boots, seat, tires, and suspension work can pick up 2” or more, and that can really help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
810 Posts
I concur with what was mentioned above. As a 2013, you may be thinking of a trade. If you are, the 1260's seat height are noticeably lower than previous Multistrada's.
1200 @33.4"
[email protected]"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
I've a 29" inseam and '14 MTS. My history is way more off road than street, on bikes with 36"+ seat height. I know its a different animal, but I don't know what its like to touch with both feet, much less flat foot, so the MTS height/seat width doesn't bother me at all (I can barely (and I mean barely), tip toe with both feet). That said I sat on 2020 MTS PP last weekend. To my dismay I could nearly flat foot both feet. Not only is the seat height lower but the seat is much more narrow in the front. Though I'm fine on the '14 it definitely got me thinking. How much is it worth, in $$$$, to get both feet solid on the ground? I would not screw around with tricks to adjust the '14, with potential performance compromises, I would get a 1260.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Seems our bikes need an old Citroen approach to suspension height; the bike could drop a few inches when it's stopped at the lights then pop back up once legs are up.... Maybe Ducati could look into this. Leg extension surgery is also an option.

Joking aside, I am certain that the reason there are a number of new, low km Multis for sale is because of ride height fright. I'm 6'1" and a bit with a 32" inseam and my big 1200 Enduro can be very scary in slippery gas stations and occasional traffic stops. When you are used to being able to waddle your bike around (not cool I know, but sometimes practical) and then sit astride a Multi and can't get both feet firm on the ground, you quickly find that every parking spot is strategic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I didn't realize the newer bikes were lower, that's a little intriguing. Nice to know I'm not the only one struggling with it.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,565 Posts
As mentioned above ...
1. Lower your preload setting (especially in Sport mode) as much as you are comfortable with.
2. Go with lower profile tires.
That worked well for me.

Long term, I can see a 1260 with its built-in lower seat height in my future too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
132 Posts
I purchased Daytona M-Star boots and they do help. I bought slightly used off advrider for around $250. Excellent boots and they do give you almost 6 cm
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,553 Posts
Well, that’s my real best solution: Buy a bike that fits.
This is what I'd recommend too... I love the Multi but there are a LOT of great bikes out there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I tried the Daytona Max Sports GTX Boots which are supposed to help, but at the sole they provided maybe 2-3mm vs. my Timberland boots. Most of the height increase was at the sole, which didn't help me. I returned the boots and continue to use Timberlands because they do provide about 2 cm more than my previous riding boots.

I hate the tiptoeing too but as mentioned above, I've just had to be strategic about parking spots.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
55 Posts
I tried the Daytona Max Sports GTX Boots which are supposed to help, but at the sole they provided maybe 2-3mm vs. my Timberland boots. Most of the height increase was at the sole, which didn't help me. I returned the boots and continue to use Timberlands because they do provide about 2 cm more than my previous riding boots.

I hate the tiptoeing too but as mentioned above, I've just had to be strategic about parking spots.
A few years back, someone posted a custom-machined spacer that they used to lower the Skyhook suspension a bit (I didn't really "get" how it was supposed to work, however). I've been living with this bike (and my 29" inseam) since it was new, but I'm getting tired of tiptoeing in and out of parking spaces and the like. Has anyone come up with a decent way to lower the suspension on this bike? I put it in Urban mode to get a little more sag if I know I'm going to be is a questionable foot situation, but it's not always enough or convenient. I love this bike (except the fuel sensor and rear brake, of course), but I'm seriously considering getting something different, just for a lower seat height. I do have the low-profile seat, but it doesn't make much difference at all.

Thanks and ride safe!
[/QUOTE
I have a 13 Multistrada and when I installed the 42 tooth rear sprocket with stock chain it reduced the wheelbase (1/2 inch) and lower the back ride height so I lowered the forks in the triple clamps the same amount to keep suspension geometry close to stock. It did not lower it a lot but maybe 2mm which was a noticeable difference. I think you could do about the same by taking a link out of the stock chain.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,553 Posts
JMO but I think modifying the suspension based on someone's internet widget is a TERRIBLE idea... if you move it enough to make a difference to a shorter rider then you're significantly changing components or critical dimensions on the suspension, and while everyone on the internet is a world class vehicle engineer in their own minds... that almost NEVER translates into actual world class vehicle engineering skills.

Thinner seat will just hurt your ass (and maybe your nuts)... buggering up the basic suspension dynamics? That could have more serious ramifications.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
I agree strongly with DaveK. Even loosening the fork clamps and dropping the front end a little can have a significant impact on handling. It's funny that Ducati, a company based in Italy (not know for exceptionally tall men) create a family of bikes that are simply too high for the majority of riders to feel comfortable on; the big Enduros really are for a niche market.

This is new to me; I bought a new 2017 Enduro off the showroom floor back in October and only rode it about a month and a half before putting it away for winter. I'm 6'1' (and a bit) with a 32" inseam and very quickly learned to be very careful when static or coming to a stop. No waddling. Strategic parking. Bend you knees.

When I started hunting back in summer, I was surprised to see so many relatively low mileage, fully accessorized Multis for sale but I think the reason is that many new owners find their vertical relationship with the bike too challenging. It's clearly not a bike for everyone. I've never ridden a BMW R GS 1200 or similar. Are they also really tall or as tall as Multis?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
358 Posts
Upgrade to a newer model bike, 2015-18? As mentioned the seat can be lowered. I have a 30" seam, and I have a 14, I had the lowered seat installed until the upholstery went to crap so i reinstalled my original seat, there was a noticeable difference but I got use to it. I consider myself as an above average rider who can compete in slow or tight 18' turns, similarr to the police rodeos and have no need to flat foot the bike. Having the bike slightly leaned to the ledt when I come to a stop is no big deal and just becomes muscle memory.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
I appreciate threads like this. It makes me realize I'm not the only one with difficulty parking this bike. I'm 5' 10" with a 30" inseam and this bike around town can be a chore. The waddle of shame away from the fuel pump when the keyless start doesn't work can be nerve wracking with all the oil and gas on the ground. I was also one that made the mistake of buying the multi after a 25 year hiatus from riding. Took some time to get used to it, it's a lot of motorcycle. I actually just bought a KTM Duke 390 for around town and my short commute and use the multi primarily for long rides or when I'm out with fellow riders on larger bikes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
810 Posts
I don't like messing with the bike's geometry. Boots and a seat mod will help but sometimes the perceived drawback is actually a blessing. How much time do we spend with our feet on the ground relative to on the foot-pegs?
A shorter inseam provides more riding leg-room. This is a comfort advantage which can be felt on longer rides.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,109 Posts
True, BUT, the time you spend putting your feet down, though short, is crucial to the enjoyment of the ride. You can have a great day riding that bike, stop at a light, put your foot in an oil spot, drop the bike causing thousands in damages. Great ride instantly turned to total shit.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top