Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
2012 EVO SP Corse with ASV shorty levers...

I'm having a difficult time finding neutral and shifting gears periodically and want to know if it's a common issue with this models clutch or does it have to do with my lever. Opinions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
391 Posts
Mine is the best shifting Duc I have had, however they all appreciate a firm shift. I am guessing you have given it a good bleed and it is not making any un-natural clutch sounds?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I bled it a little but I'll do it again. I did notice that the brake fluid in the clutch reservoir was a bit murky, even had some grease/gunk in it. I'll fiddle with it and see what happens. Thanks for the response.
 

·
Sophomore Member
Joined
·
3,192 Posts
Its the same clutch used on pretty much all of the dry clutch Ducatis. If you don't have any squishiness on the lever, then you don't have any air in it and are probably fine there. It honestly sounds more like your transmission than your clutch. I will say that finding neutral can sometimes take finesse. From first, I usually miss in it and go into second. I can usually find it from second. This has been the case for multiple bikes (Ducati and otherwise). What problems are you having with shifting? Also, how many miles do you have on it? The transmissions will loosen up a little bit and shift better after they have a few (thousand) miles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
120 Posts
Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
To follow up on this, I sourced and fixed the problem. I bled the master cylinder on the clutch perch, bled the slave master cylinder, removed the clutch pack and inspected the friction plates, then I took off the Yoyodyne slave master cylinder. Here in lies the problem, the slave master cylinder piston. It was completed caked with road grime, so much in fact that I thought it was a fiber composite washer. Even in the piston orfice, heavy grime was present. I cleaned all surfaces and the clutch actuation/neutral was effortless.
 

Attachments

·
1st Gen Hyper Hooligan
Joined
·
2,372 Posts
I always thought the clutch was a bit tough. Also currently suffering from tennis elbow which doesnt help. Due to the common issues with aftermarket slave cylinders, what can I do to lighten up my clutch lever a bit?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
663 Posts
I always thought the clutch was a bit tough. Also currently suffering from tennis elbow which doesnt help. Due to the common issues with aftermarket slave cylinders, what can I do to lighten up my clutch lever a bit?
Have you tried dropping a couple of springs?
 

·
1st Gen Hyper Hooligan
Joined
·
2,372 Posts
Have you tried dropping a couple of springs?
Not at all. Clutch is a rizoma pressure plate and spring caps and besides that is stock. You mean if I remove a few stacks from the clutch it'll lighten up the clutch?

Sorry, first dry clutch Duc
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
663 Posts
Not at all. Clutch is a rizoma pressure plate and spring caps and besides that is stock. You mean if I remove a few stacks from the clutch it'll lighten up the clutch?

Sorry, first dry clutch Duc
No worries, it's my first as well.

You want the stack height to be within spec or the clutch won't engage/disengage properly so no, you don't want to just remove plates.

I meant removing a couple of the clutch springs to lighten the lever. You'd be removing two opposing springs of the six, which would lighten the pull at the lever by one third without shifting the engagement point. Of course, you're also removing one third of the force holding the clutch together under throttle so you might get into some slippage problems, although that hasn't seemed to be the experience. Looky here.

The other alternative - bigger slave and/or smaller master - can achieve a lighter clutch pull without softening the clutch's engagement but will shift the friction point closer to the bar (ie you have to pull the lever further to disengage).
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top