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I took the MSF course in December and I am finally ready to buy my first bike. Ive been in love with the GT1000 ever since I say Tron in 2010 and saw Sam Flyn on sportsclassic when I was a little kid ( even though I think he was on a biposto) :). nonetheless its been a dream of mine to ride one im just alittle skeptical because it is a 919cc bike and I hear ducatis can be very torque especially for beginners. ive been doing alittle research and I have also heard that they are lean and tend to surge at constant speeds and low rpm. so all in all id love to get the bike but just need alittle info from the community as to what I should think about before even if I decided to buy the bike... thanks !
 

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It’s an easy bike to ride, soft throttle response and not overpowering. You could get away with it. There are questions you should ask yourself first.
Am I athletic, do I learn fast, do I live in a place where traffic is heavy, do I have self restraint, do I have money to replace scraped up or dented parts, do I heal quickly, do I have good health insurance?
You will buy what you want but you must know it’s easier to learn on a small bike, (250 or 500 cc). I knew a guy whose first bike was a GSXR600 and he did just fine. I also saw a guy on a GSXR600 crash on his first ride, never got out of the shop parking lot. (2001 Phoenix AZ Ride Now Powersports). I didn’t sell him the bike I was just a parts man.
You’ll probably be just fine with the GT1000, but do some serious thinking before you buy.
 

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My first bike was a GT1000, still have it and bought a biposto just like the Tron movie. It’s not as much power as you think, after riding a monster 1100 evo it seems underpowered. Like john said, if you can have self restraint and take it slow to learn then go for it, just remember parts aren’t the easiest to find and fixing it may be expensive. But all in all if a rider is stupid a 125cc can kill them.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It’s an easy bike to ride, soft throttle response and not overpowering. You could get away with it. There are questions you should ask yourself first.
Am I athletic, do I learn fast, do I live in a place where traffic is heavy, do I have self restraint, do I have money to replace scraped up or dented parts, do I heal quickly, do I have good health insurance?
You will buy what you want but you must know it’s easier to learn on a small bike, (250 or 500 cc). I knew a guy whose first bike was a GSXR600 and he did just fine. I also saw a guy on a GSXR600 crash on his first ride, never got out of the shop parking lot. (2001 Phoenix AZ Ride Now Powersports). I didn’t sell him the bike I was just a parts man.
You’ll probably be just fine with the GT1000, but do some serious thinking before you buy.
Hey thanks For your response I would say I am pretty athletic and here in Williamsburg va where I live I’d say there are plenty open roads I can practice on. Even my neighborhood has great practice with wide highway like roads That stretch for miles and a 35 mph speed limit. I do think I have that self control and that patience and respect needed to get along with the high cc. I don’t plan on riding with others but see myself more just cruising on sunny afternoons on the bike.
 

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I always tell everyone to buy a little bike to practice up on because it’s really depressing when you don’t listen and drop your shiny new Ducati and find out that it will cost thousands to fix it. No one ever listens. But , when they drop the Ducati, they hear me whispering “ Told you so “. In their ear.
 

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And many more threads if you search.
 

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I took the MSF course in December and I am finally ready to buy my first bike. Ive been in love with the GT1000 ever since I say Tron in 2010 and saw Sam Flyn on sportsclassic when I was a little kid ( even though I think he was on a biposto) :). nonetheless its been a dream of mine to ride one im just alittle skeptical because it is a 919cc bike and I hear ducatis can be very torque especially for beginners. ive been doing alittle research and I have also heard that they are lean and tend to surge at constant speeds and low rpm. so all in all id love to get the bike but just need alittle info from the community as to what I should think about before even if I decided to buy the bike... thanks !

And many more threads if you search.
 

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I'd start with a smaller, lighter bike --with ABS for sure. You'll know when you're ready to move up, which may be just a season. The GT's instant throttle response, big torque and high power-to-weight ratio can easily unhorse you by surprise (when a pothole jogs your elbow, for example). By today's mad V4 standards the Sport Classics aren't quick, but they're quicker than many superbikes of the 1990s. If you haven't already, give Hunter S Thompson's "Song of the Sausage Creature" a read. The classic article's a lot of fun, and it was about a slower Ducati than a GT.
 

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IThe GT's instant throttle response...
Yep.

I assume you've already thought about the implications of maintaining a 'decade out of production' Ducati. However the fueling (assuming stock) is the biggest issue I see as a first bike. It's pretty snatchy down low. It was so bad that I got into the habit of clutching in at intersections. Eventually I fixed the fueling w/ a WASP PUK & PCIII and now it's like butter. But navigating @ slow speeds w/ a stock bike won't be an optimal way to develop those skills.

That said it will work. My first bike was a 650 lb 1100cc Honda cruiser and my GT was my second bike.
 

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Yeah, so, here's the deal,

If you have to ask if you should do it, you shouldn't. I say that because if you are truly bitten by the Ducati bug it won't matter what anyone says anyway, and if you aren't truly bitten then there are better bikes to own first.

My first bike was a brand spanking new Ducati 907ie back in 1991 (before the 900ss was re-introduced). Yes, I did drop it. WIthin 24 hours of bringing it home I got into a situation that I even saw coming and STILL did something stupid and dropped it - basically I stopped moving in the middle of a slow, sharp turn and fell over.

The kicker? That wasn't the first damage I did to the bike. On the way home from the dealer it was raining out. I was crossing an intersection, ran through some water that was running across the intersection, and hit a pothole. Hard. I didn't discover it until later but I dented the rim slightly when I did that.

Everyone and their brother told me not to buy the 907 as my first bike. EVERYONE. Whatever. I was about start looking for something else when it occurred to me that I'd be sitting at a light on my new whatever, and some guy would pull up on a Ducati, and I'd be staring at that bike wishing I had bought it instead. So I said screw it and started a 25+ year infatuation with the brand. Things probably would have been "easier" if I had bought a used Japanese bike, but I don' think things would have been better.

A Ducati anything isn't the best choice for a first bike. But, only you can decide if it's the right bike for you. So if you're asking if it's a "good first bike" the answer is no. If you're asking if you should buy one anyway, the answer is how the heck should I know?

If you don't have a good dealer nearby, you aren't mechanically inclined, and/or you have a healthy sense of entitlement you probably shouldn't buy a Ducati at all, let alone for your first bike.
 
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