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Discussion Starter #1
Turned in my 848 into a track bike, 520 kit...

Is anyone running 38T rear? any issues?

thx
 

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other then Daytona or possibly road america why would you need a 38? but it wil l go on no problem
 

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638 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
other then Daytona or possibly road america why would you need a 38? but it wil l go on no problem
That's why I'm asking (track bike)...I know I'll loose some off the line, but gain some at the top...also more MPH on each gear...just not sure about the mid range...

also I have full bazzaz on my 848, not sure if have to remap...

may be just stick with 39T...

thx
 

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Old Wizard
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Track Gear Selection

You can expect to need different gearing for different tracks. The difficulty in answering your question is that people here will suggest sprocket sizes to you that can only be used as a starting point. Gear selection is very dependent upon your style of riding.

In general, you would like to have a final drive gearing that allows you to hit the peak horsepower rpm at least one place on a given track. Otherwise, you’re not using all the gears in your transmission and aren’t taking advantage of the close spacing between the higher gears. (Daytona is an obvious exception because gearing for the high speed oval section will result in over-gearing for the infield sections. This also illustrates the need to select a compromise gearing that doesn’t permit the maximum top speed but gives better drive out of the corners.)

So, you also need to find a final drive gear ratio that will minimize your number of gear changes and still place you at engine speeds that give you the best drive out of the corners. You need to build power quickly, sometimes at the slight expense of outright top speed in the straights. The fastest lap times are not so much controlled by top speed as they are by getting from one corner to the next as quickly as possible.

Lower gearing usually means more gear changes that lower your lap times. Sometimes you just can’t shift mid-corner, so you go in slower in a lower gear which allows you to come out harder. It is always a trade-off between gear selection and riding technique.

Any final drive ratio represents a trade-off between acceleration and gear range: the lower the ratio, the quicker the acceleration and the narrower the range of speed for any one gear. Consequently, a lower final-drive ratio means that while the bike scats aggressively in any gear, it requires a more shifting because the gear range is so narrow. Add to that a close ratio set of transmission gears and you have a bike that requires more fiddling with gear selection to stay on the torque curve.
 
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