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Hi guys!

I just bought my 2006 999s with 20.000 km's, and use it mainly for home-work transportation, but do around 5 trackdays per year and some sport-touring weekends.. So I use it pretty allround I suppose..

It's a huge stepup from my former 900ss, which I learned to ride/race on.

What conversion parts do you guys suggest for trackdays? I want to keep the original fairings off to save them, but what's the risk of damage for the headlight unit etc.?

- What parts do I need in my spare parts bag
- what are good value/quality fairings for the 2005 model? (Brands please)
- do I need a subframe to replace the headlight unit or is rigid to survive!
- suspension settings?
- what parts are prone for damage if you do a lowside ( on 900 ss these were clipons, levers, rearsets)

Any advise would be great from the experienced racers...
 

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Probably your best starting point is to get the suspension set up for your weight; maybe refresh the fork oil and seals if they've not been changed lately. Get some new tyres and start pushing the bike a bit on a few trackdays. After that you'll have a better idea about any further changes you might want to make. A quickshifter makes getting down the straights a lot easier. I wouldn't worry about the headlamp bucket - if you manage to break that then your bike is thoroughly trashed ;-)

Spare fairings are a good idea - easy to find on eBay. I got some cheap pattern fairings from a guy in Hong Kong: cheap and fit fine. Crash bungs are cheap enough and alternative bars and pegs are readily available.

Enjoy!
 

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Suspension tuneup, tires and brakes. If you can over ride them then look for additional upgrades.
 

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For your spares list add reservoirs for the clutch and front brake. I found these quite susceptible to damage(destroyed) in even the lightest lowside get-off. Alternatively consider switching to remote reservoirs.
I see from your pic the bike is a biposto, a switch to a mono subframe will save a bit of up-high weight.
 

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From what you described as maybe a track day every couple months with continuous road usage, you definitely want to just leave the headlight be man. It's a royal PITA to refit once it's off. And even if you were to break it on the track, the headlight buckets can be found for very cheap second-hand. Like someone said above -- fresh suspension, fresh fluids all around, and fresh tires, and you are more than set for the occasional track days. Just remove your mirrors and tape over everything else.
 

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From what you described as maybe a track day every couple months with continuous road usage, you definitely want to just leave the headlight be man. It's a royal PITA to refit once it's off. And even if you were to break it on the track, the headlight buckets can be found for very cheap second-hand. Like someone said above -- fresh suspension, fresh fluids all around, and fresh tires, and you are more than set for the occasional track days. Just remove your mirrors and tape over everything else.
Oh-Gawd!! Mirror removal is Ok.. But putting them back on (correctly) is a Royal pain in the ass!!

RC
 

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The primary parts that get damaged doing a lowside are 1. you and 2. the engine.

My lowside at NH Motorspeedway cooked my rod bearings because they got starved and had to do an engine swap as a result. For my next track day, I bought an MPS kill switch, so that it doesn't happen again. Got a new right-hand starter switch to link it up to, and only need to figure out where to mount the kill switch.

Other than that, the bobbins on the swingarm kind of trashed their threads, one brake lever and the left clipon and the left rearset. The fairing got pretty screwed up, but that was an old throwaway for the track anyway, and the waterpump housing got scraped up pretty good. With the new engine, that was no longer an issue. Frame, forks, everything else checked out A-OK.

Best recommendation: don't lowside.

Ron
 

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I'll have to disagree with C-simian. I feel the engine doesn't need to be on the list. While I am entirely sympathetic to his loss and think adding a kill switch like he has is a great idea. It's not very common for an engine to fail like his has.

I do agree with the #1, You (and add gear to it)

Spare rear sets if you don't have the collapsable kind.

Spare shifter lever.

Spare clutch and front brake lever.

Install bar end sliders.

Do or don't install underbody sliders.

Set up your suspension, don't buy anything. It's not necessary.

But for 4-5 track days a year you aren't going to be out there killing it. There is no need to deal with the work of head and tail lights. Modify as you go, it's more economical and suits your personal needs. Not the suggestions of idiots like me that troll around on a forum because I have an unusual love for a brand of bike, more than half of which I have never ridden.
 

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For any Duc that sees track use I would highly recommend a heavy duty water pump housing and clutch cover. Speedy Moto and woodcraft make some good products. These 2 items will protect your Duc and help it crash better.


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